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WOAH. Lizzie from MAFS just flaunted a NEW tattoo in a racy bedroom photo shoot

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In a rather, er, risqué moment, Lizzie from Married at First Sight has posted a racy photo of herself on Instagram, and fans have lost it over her new tattoo.
'When Married at First Sight 's Lizzie Sobinoff first appeared on the show, she was a blonde bombshell who made quite the first impression on the Australian public with her refreshingly no-BS attitude. And these days, not a lot has changed.. well, apart from her entire look. Indeed the stunning blonde now rocks some seriously sultry dark tresses - and that's not to mention her incredible figure, which is looking better than ever. And now, in a Instagram moment none of us were expecting, the stunning reality TV star has showed off something else that looks very new, and we cannot stop staring. On the show, it became apparent that Lizzie was a big fan of tattoos. With impressive prints on her leg, torso and arm, we couldn't stop looking at her incredible ink-work. But the 27-year-old wasn't going to stop just there. Recently, the gorgeous reality TV queen got some more tattoo-work done, and she's keen for everyone to know it. Taking to her Instagram in June, Lizzie shared two images of her near-naked self showing off the new tat in all its glory - and glorious it certainly was. Captioning the second picture \'Not. Your. Typical. 👊.\', we can't help but agree with Lizzie, who received a flurry of comments and likes within hours of posting said pics. \'And just like that,she changed the game, God damn girl!\' wrote one fan. Meanwhile, another said of Lizzie's racy pic: \'Smoking hot 🔥 you look absolutely amazing!\' And just a quick scroll through the comments will bring up several hundred occurances of the fire emoji being used. Yep, we've got the memo Lizzie, you look a-mazing! Lizzie has been open about her tattoos in the past. Speaking to Today Extra the reality star said: \'I'm probably more tattooed than people think. \'I have the one on my wrist.. but underneath [my clothes] it's pretty intense\'. WATCH: Lizzie's empowering speech during the MAFS finale. Story continues after video.. Watch video Speaking to OK! magazine earlier this year, Lizzie said she was keen to get more tattoos, inclding a \'black widow spider\'. \'But I don't want any more on my arms or calves,\' she explained. \'I like to be different and eccentric and I don't apologise for that. Go big or go home!\' And that goes for herself, and the opposite sex, she added. \'I tend to go for guys with tattoos. I actually love guys with facial tattoos,\' she told OK! . \'I've dated guys that are completely tattooed, including facial tattoos. I like different people. I don't judge people on their appearance.\' With this in mind, we can't help but applaud the gal for going out and getting what she wants - Sam Ball who?'

A giant possum-eating spider exists in Australia and it is absolutely nightmare-inducing

Photo Australia News Today

A photo of a giant spider eating a small possum has gone viral, inducing nightmares all around the world.
'A photo of a giant spider eating a small possum has gone viral, inducing nightmares all around the world.The photo was posted on Saturday to a Facebook group called Tasmanian Insects and Spiders by a woman named Justine Latton.Latton told INSIDER that her husband snapped the picture while on a ski trip with some friends in Mount Field, Tasmania.The photo shows a giant huntsman spider eating a pygmy possum, a small marsupial found in the Asia Pacific region.And while pygmy possums are not usually a huntsman’s meal of choice, Latton says the spider may have just seen an opportunity too good to pass up.A photo of a giant spider eating a small possum has gone viral, inducing nightmares all around the world. up to 12 inches (30 centimeters). Its namesake comes from the way it hunts and kills its prey instead of using a web like other spider species. \' data-reactid=\'28\'>The huntsman spider, commonly found in Australia and other parts of the world, typically has a 1 inch (2.5 centimeter) body and a leg span of up to 5 inches (12.7 centimeters), though larger species can have a leg span of up to 12 inches (30 centimeters). Its namesake comes from the way it hunts and kills its prey instead of using a web like other spider species.And while huntsman spiders are venomous, they are not considered to be dangerous to humans and their diet consists mainly of insects and other invertebrates, and occasionally small lizards. \' data-reactid=\'29\'> And while huntsman spiders are venomous, they are not considered to be dangerous to humans and their diet consists mainly of insects and other invertebrates, and occasionally small lizards.The photo first surfaced on Saturday on a Facebook group called Tasmanian Insects and Spiders, and was posted by a woman named Justine Latton.  \' data-reactid=\'30\'> The photo first surfaced on Saturday on a Facebook group called Tasmanian Insects and Spiders, and was posted by a woman named Justine Latton.Latton told INSIDER that the photo was taken by her husband Adam a few weeks ago when he and some friends were staying at a ski lodge in Mount Field, Tasmania, located about 55 miles (90 kilometers) northwest of the capital Hobart.  \' data-reactid=\'31\'> Latton told INSIDER that the photo was taken by her husband Adam a few weeks ago when he and some friends were staying at a ski lodge in Mount Field, Tasmania, located about 55 miles (90 kilometers) northwest of the capital Hobart.  \'It was one of the biggest huntsman spiders he'd ever seen,\' she said, likening its size to \'an adult's palm.\' \' data-reactid=\'32\'> “It was one of the biggest huntsman spiders he’d ever seen,” she said, likening its size to “an adult’s palm.” The most disturbing part of the photo is the huntsman's catch of the day — a pygmy possum, a type of small marsupial endemic to Australia and other parts of Asia Pacific.  \' data-reactid=\'33\'> The most disturbing part of the photo is the huntsman’s catch of the day — a pygmy possum, a type of small marsupial endemic to Australia and other parts of Asia Pacific.And while pygmy possums are not usually a huntsman's snack of choice, Latton says the spider may have just seen an opportunity too good to pass up. \' data-reactid=\'34\'> And while pygmy possums are not usually a huntsman’s snack of choice, Latton says the spider may have just seen an opportunity too good to pass up. \'Pygmy possums are quite common up there, we reckon the spider probably just saw an opportunity and went for it,\' she said, adding that it was about the size of a large walnut. \' data-reactid=\'35\'> “Pygmy possums are quite common up there, we reckon the spider probably just saw an opportunity and went for it,” she said, adding that it was about the size of a large walnut.Latton said her husband and friends caught the spider and its prey and released it outdoors. \' data-reactid=\'36\'> Latton said her husband and friends caught the spider and its prey and released it outdoors. \'No spiders were harmed in the relocation effort,\' she said. \' data-reactid=\'37\'> “No spiders were harmed in the relocation effort,” she said.Latton said that she was surprised by the response to her photo, which garnered over 7,200 shares on Facebook by Wednesday local time.  \' data-reactid=\'38\'> Latton said that she was surprised by the response to her photo, which garnered over 7,200 shares on Facebook by Wednesday local time.  \'I didn't imagine it would cause such a media maelstrom,\' she said.  \' data-reactid=\'39\'> “I didn’t imagine it would cause such a media maelstrom,” she said.And while Latton acknowledged that some travelers might be put off by the photo, she told INSIDER that the photo captured a \'very rare occurrence\' and encouraged people to visit Tasmania.  \' data-reactid=\'40\'> And while Latton acknowledged that some travelers might be put off by the photo, she told INSIDER that the photo captured a “very rare occurrence” and encouraged people to visit Tasmania.  \'Tassie is gorgeous!\' she said, though I'm still not convinced.   \' data-reactid=\'41\'> “Tassie is gorgeous!” she said, though I’m still not convinced.Source link Finance News Australia . The post A giant possum-eating spider exists in Australia and it is absolutely nightmare-inducing appeared first on Australia News Today .'

Royally sleek: The best royal up-do hairstyles of all time

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The royals know exactly how to execute the humble up-do with grace and class - and we've got all the photo evidence to prove it. Take a look back at our favourite royal up-do hairstyles of all time.
'Is there ever a classier way to wear one's hair than in a sleek and chic bun? We tend to think not - and the British royals are case in point. On many a royal occasion, team Windsor has wowed us time and time again with their impeccable fashion choices, their stunning accessories and, of course, their enviable tresses. From Kate Middleton's ever-classy evening looks to Meghan Markle's signature bun - after witnessing such perfection time and time again, it's almost impossible to not feel inspired by the regal elite. To honour their time-old knack for nailing the humble up-do, be it a ponytail, bun or even a plaited creation, we've rounded up the most iconic royal slick-'dos of all time. Don't be afraid to whack these puppies into a scrapbook and take them to your hairdresser - every single one oozes glamour and class. Get comfy and keep scrolling for your daily dose of hair-spiration. WATCH: Kate Middleton's best hair moments. Gallery begins after video.. Watch video Jess Pullar Royally sleek: The best royal up-do hairstyles of all time Kate's 2019 [BAFTA look](https://www.nowtolove.com.au/fashion/red-carpet/royals-bafta-awards-53949|target=\'_blank\') was all kinds of chic, but her swept-back up-do was the cherry on top of the pie. (Getty) Meanwhile, Duchess Meghan is also a known slayer of the bun - so much so that it's become synonymous with her signature look! Her slick up-do worn to the [National Theatre](https://www.nowtolove.com.au/royals/british-royal-family/meghan-markle-beige-dress-53859|target=\'_blank\') was an iconic moment. (Getty) Zara Phillips is a known lover of the ponytail, but her chic bun worn to the [2019 Easter service](https://www.nowtolove.com.au/royals/british-royal-family/royals-celebrate-easter-2019-55169|target=\'_blank\') at St George's Chapel stepped things up a notch. (Getty) And we can't forget Kate's love of a chic pony-tail. This messy style she donned as she visited the RAF Air Cadets is the perfect glam-casual look. (Getty) And let's not forget our favourite international royals - Wife of Monaco royal Pierre Casiraghi, Beatrice Borromeo, rocked a stunning wedding day up-do that will forever be remembered in the hairstyle hall of fame. (Getty) Our unsung royal fashion icon Sophie, Countess of Wessex is also a keen wearer of an up-do. Wait till you see the back of this casual 'do she wore of the Royal Windsor Horse Show.. (Getty) Yep, the French plait is old hat for this trendy royal! (Getty) Our hair Queen Meghan once again nailed a sleek and slick bun during her tour of Morocco earlier in 2019 - and let's not forget *that* heavenly Dior gown she wore with it! (Getty) Spot the tail! A ponytail that is - Princess Beatrice's stylish hairdo worn to Lady Gabriella Windsor's royal wedding in May 2019 was undeniably glam. (Getty) Lady Amelia Windsor looks amazing in almost anything - but this sleek ponytail is definitely oozing cool-girl chic in this Dior ensemble. (Getty) And in another iconic look ahead of a Dior fashion show in Paris, Amelia proved she's not a one-hit-wonder when it comes to nailing the up-do. (Getty) Attending a concert back in 2015, Queen Maxima of The Netherlands' swirled bun continues to mesmerise us. (Getty) And once again, Kate nailed the pony-tail up-do like no other when she stepped out on a rainy day in Blackpool - a smart style for wet weather, might we add! (Getty)'

I'm National Geographic Photographer Mark Thiessen, And This Is How I Work

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In their latest issue, National Geographic showed readers how smokejumpers fight wildfires in the Alaskan forest, with images by photographer Mark Thiessen. Firefighting photos is a specialty for Mark; he’s been doing it for 25 years, and shooting
'In their latest issue, National Geographic showed readers how smokejumpers fight wildfires in the Alaskan forest, with images by photographer Mark Thiessen. Firefighting photos is a specialty for Mark; he’s been doing it for 25 years, and shooting for NatGeo for 29. We talked to him about his first published news photo, his favourite photography gear, and his hack for sleeping on the road.\t\t\t\t\t More »'