{{ 'Go back' | translate}}
Njus logo

Entrepreneur news | Njus Ireland

Moon landings footage would have been impossible to fake – here’s why

Entrepreneur Silicon Republic

With the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing approaching, Howard Berry of the University of Hertfordshire wants to debunk some myths.
'A version of this article was originally published by The Conversation ( CC BY-ND 4.0 ) It’s been half a century since the magnificent  Apollo 11 moon landing , yet many people still don’t believe it actually happened.Conspiracy theories about the event dating back to the 1970s are in fact more popular than ever.A common theory is that film director Stanley Kubrick helped NASA fake the historic footage of its six successful moon landings.But would it really have been possible to do that with the technology available at the time?I’m not a space travel expert, an engineer or a scientist.I am a filmmaker and lecturer in film post-production, and – while I can’t say how we landed on the moon in 1969 – I can say with some certainty that the footage would have been impossible to fake.Here are some of the most common beliefs and questions – and why they don’t hold up. ‘The moon landings were filmed in a TV studio.’ There are  two different ways  of capturing moving images.One is film, actual strips of photographic material onto which a series of images are exposed.Another is video, which is an electronic method of recording onto various mediums, such as moving magnetic tape.With video, you can also broadcast to a television receiver.A standard motion picture film records images at 24 frames per second, while broadcast television is typically either 25 or 30 frames, depending on where you are in the world.If we go along with the idea that the moon landings were taped in a TV studio, then we would expect them to be 30 frames per second video, which was the television standard at the time.However, we know that video from the first moon landing was recorded at  10 frames per second  in SSTV (slow scan television) with a  special camera . ‘They used the Apollo special camera in a studio and then slowed down the footage to make it look like there was less gravity.’ Some people may contend that when you look at people moving in slow motion, they appear to be in a low gravity environment.Slowing down film requires more frames than usual, so you start with a camera capable of capturing more frames in a second than a normal one – this is called overcranking.When this is played back at the normal frame rate, this footage plays back for longer.If you can’t overcrank your camera, but you record at a normal frame rate, you can instead artificially slow down the footage, but you need a way to store the frames and generate new extra frames to slow it down.At the time of the broadcast, magnetic disk recorders capable of storing slow motion footage  could only capture 30 seconds in total , for a playback of 90 seconds of slow motion video.To capture 143 minutes in slow motion, you’d need to record and store 47 minutes of live action, which simply wasn’t possible.Neil Armstrong took most of the photographs from the historic moonwalk, but this rare shot from fellow moonwalker Buzz Aldrin shows Armstrong at work near the lunar module Eagle.Image: NASA ‘They could have had an advanced storage recorder to create slow motion footage.Everyone knows NASA gets the tech before the public.’ Well, maybe they did have a super secret extra storage recorder – but one almost 3,000 times more advanced?Doubtful. ‘They shot it on film and slowed down the film instead.You can have as much film as you like to do this.Then they converted the film to be shown on TV.’ That’s a bit of logic at last!But shooting it on film would require thousands of feet of film.A typical reel of 35mm film – at 24 frames per minutes second – lasts 11 minutes and is  1,000ft long . If we apply this to 12 frames per second film (as close to 10 as we can get with standard film) running for 143 minutes (this is how long the Apollo 11 footage lasts), you would need six and a half reels.These would then need to be put together.The splicing joins, transfer of negatives and printing – and potentially grains, specks of dust, hairs or scratches – would instantly give the game away.There are none of these artefacts present, which means it wasn’t shot on film.When you take into account that the subsequent Apollo landings were shot at 30 frames per second, then to fake those would be three times harder.So the Apollo 11 mission would have been the easy one. ‘But the flag is blowing in the wind, and there’s no wind on the moon.The wind is clearly from a cooling fan inside the studio.Or it was filmed in the desert.’ It isn’t.After the flag is let go, it settles gently and then doesn’t move at all in the remaining footage.Also, how much wind is there inside a TV studio?There’s wind in the desert, I’ll accept that.But in July, the desert is also very hot and you can normally see heat waves present in footage recorded in hot places.There are no heat waves on the moon landing footage, so it wasn’t filmed in the desert.And the flag still isn’t moving anyway. ‘Well, we all know Stanley Kubrick filmed it.’ Stanley Kubrick could have been asked to fake the moon landings.But as he was such a perfectionist, he would have insisted on shooting it on location.And it’s well documented  he didn’t like to fly , so that about wraps that one up… Next? ‘It’s possible to recreate dinosaurs from mosquitoes the way they did in Jurassic Park, but the government is keeping it a secret.’ I give up.By Howard Berry Howard Berry is head of post-production for the BA film and television production degree and programme leader for the MA film and television production degree in the School of Creative Arts at the University of Hertfordshire . He is also a world recognised expert in the production and films of Stanley Kubrick. . The post Moon landings footage would have been impossible to fake – here’s why appeared first on Silicon Republic .'

‘People with disabilities are some of the best problem-solvers in our society’

Entrepreneur Silicon Republic

Noel Joyce, head of design at Hax, believes that those living with a disability have a superpower that lets them, in some aspects, see into the future.
'As part of our efforts to optimise human society into the most efficient mechanism, we attempt to create a world for the most ‘average person’ possible.The only problem is that what defines an average person is always changing.This means many get left out of the conversation on what makes a good decision about, say, infrastructure.That’s the opinion of Noel Joyce, head of design at the international hardware accelerator, Hax , who spoke at Inspirefest 2019 last May.After a mountain biking accident left him paralysed and in a wheelchair, ending his career in the military, Joyce went back to education to study design and since then, he has co-founded and developed a number of his own start-ups.Speaking on stage as a person with a disability, he noted that because of the challenges posed day to day in a society largely built for able-bodied people, he and people like him across the world have developed a necessary ‘superpower’. A matter of survival “[People with disabilities] have a unique insight into problems in a frequency that is multiples of what the average person will experience every day of their lives,” Joyce said. “This means that we are constantly engaged in solving hard problems and constantly planning ahead for eventualities in a world, which is in many cases uncertain.It’s probably fair to say that people with disabilities are some of the best forward-planners and problem-solvers in our society.” To some degree, he added, many able-bodied people are subconsciously biased to think that those with a disability are only able to think of answers to solve their own problems, rather than the society as a whole.Instead, the natural order of things should be for them to help a person with disabilities instead of the other way around. “People with disabilities who do things or manage to live their lives are referred to as ‘brave and inspiring’,” he said. “In some circumstances though, it is very much about survival and getting through the next day.Imagine bringing to bear this superpower on the toughest problems we face every day?” Realities of getting older One thing that is for certain is that whether you’re able-bodied or disabled, global demographics show the world population is getting older , and with that will come more acquired disabilities.For this reason, Joyce believes that if the voices of people with disabilities are included in planning for the future, we have the power to prolong our bodily autonomy for generations to come.For example, the development of robots and co-bots that are not designed to negotiate obstacles that we as humans have built, but ones that are designed to help us as we change in our bodies.Concluding, Joyce made a plea to governments, companies and employers across the globe to take advantage of a unique opportunity in engaging people with disabilities in work, problem-solving and in resolving societal issues.However, he stressed this shouldn’t be just because “it’s a mandatory obligation or paints you in a good light as a compassionate entity”. “Do not look at disability as something that needs to be helped, look at it as your future selves,” he said.Inspirefest is Silicon Republic’s international event celebrating the point where science, technology and the arts collide.Ultra Early Bird tickets for Inspirefest 2020 are available now . . The post ‘People with disabilities are some of the best problem-solvers in our society’ appeared first on Silicon Republic .'

Serena Williams invests in digital maternal network Mahmee

Entrepreneur Silicon Republic

Mahmee, a platform which connects new mothers to supplemental health professionals and provides vital postpartum support, has garnered funding from tennis star Serena Williams.
'International tennis star Serena Williams has, through her firm Serena Ventures, come together with angel investor Mark Cuban to invest $3m in a tech start-up Mahmee , a digital platform that aims to support new mothers and provide postpartum care.As many as one in five people in the US develop postpartum depression in the wake of the birth of a new child, and almost 700 people die each year from pregnancy related complications each year, according to the CDC.Williams herself experienced life-threatening complications in the wake of the birth of her daughter, and this fact inspired her to share her experience.She noted in an opinion piece for CNN that black women are three times more likely to die from complications. “I am incredibly excited to invest and partner with Mahmee, a company that personifies my firm’s investment philosophy,” Williams said. “Given the bleak data surrounding maternal death and injury rates, I believe that it is absolutely critical right now to invest in solutions that help protect the lives of moms and babies.” Mahmee was founded in 2014.The platform, created by Melissa Hanna, allows women to track both their own health and the health of their child in the crucial months after childbirth.It can answer questions which may not necessarily be urgent enough to contact a doctor and connects mothers with supplemental health specialists.ANNOUNCEMENT: It is my great honor to lead the new round of funding for @Backstage_Cap headliner @getmahmee , supported by @serenawilliams @mcuban @RiseOfRest +more Together Melissa, Sunny and Linda are a force the be reckoned with and will save lives https://t.co/1UZo5l6A7R — Arlan (@ArlanWasHere) July 15, 2019 Hanna says she was inspired by her own mother’s approach to maternal and infant care.Speaking to Forbes , she explained: “In the maternity healthcare process, on the surface there are generally three or four people involved: The mother, the baby, and each of their physicians. “We don’t see the many other people helping them: Nurses, lactation consultants, midwives, nutritionists, therapists, doulas, home health aids, social workers, and more.This industry is lacking the IT infrastructure needed to connect these professionals, and to monitor patients across practices and health systems.This creates gaps in care.Mahmee is the glue that connects the care ecosystem and closes the gaps.” Backstage Capital , a venture capital firm which places particular emphasis in funding companies founded by underrepresented minorities, led the funding round. . The post Serena Williams invests in digital maternal network Mahmee appeared first on Silicon Republic .'

US treasury secretary ‘not comfortable’ with Facebook Libra currency

Entrepreneur Silicon Republic

Facebook’s lofty plans to create its own currency may already be running into difficulty as US politicians come out in opposition of the move.
'US treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin has said he is “not comfortable” with the Libra cryptocurrency that Facebook is currently developing, BBC News reports.He told a press conference on Monday that he believed the currency could be leveraged by “money launderers and terrorist financiers” and said it was a national security issue.US lawmakers will be grilling a Facebook executive later over its plans for the digital currency #Libra . Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says the company has \'a lot of work to do\' before it can launch the . @France24_en #F24 pic.twitter.com/6tOM6eerKE — Stephen Carroll (@newstephen) July 16, 2019 He joins US president Donald Trump and the US central bank in voicing concerns over the ambitious project which would see it bring a blockchain-powered stablecoin to the market.Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell said when speaking to lawmakers earlier this month that he has “serious concerns” about the project.Meanwhile, Trump hinted that Facebook may require a banking license.This is one of a series of recent moves by US government recently which indicate bipartisan resistance to the growing influence, and lack of regulation, of tech companies.Democrats in US Congress are also considering a bill which would effectively ban major tech companies from wading into the world of finance by barring them from performing banking functions, putting a major halt to Facebook’s plans.Yesterday (15 July), the Federal Trade Commission meted out its largest fine on record to Facebook for its various privacy missteps, though some commentators have argued that the $5bn settlement pales in comparison to the company’s overall turnover.In June, a bipartisan bill was proposed which would compel large tech companies such as Facebook and Amazon to disclose the value of the data they collect from people and store.Dubbed the DASHBOARD Act , it was proposed by senators US Democratic senator Mark Warner and US Republican party senator Josh Hawley, who also have proposed a GDPR-esque act entitled the Do Not Track Act which would provide an opt-out option for online tracking.As the US 2020 presidential election draws closer, many democratic candidates have come out in favour of more strictly regulating companies such as Facebook or even breaking them up entirely by enforcing antitrust legislation . Senator Elizabeth Warren made such a proposal a core element of her early campaign, which senators Bernie Sanders and Kamala Harris have also expressed agreement with. . The post US treasury secretary ‘not comfortable’ with Facebook Libra currency appeared first on Silicon Republic .'

This game-changing chip can process data four times faster than 5G

Entrepreneur Silicon Republic

A team of engineers has invented a transceiver that can boost signals to quadruple the speeds of 5G before the technology even becomes the norm.
'As nations of the world work to establish 5G networks, engineers at the University of California – Irvine are already working on the technology that would make it redundant.In a paper published to the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits , the researchers detailed a new wireless transceiver that can boost radio frequencies into the 100GHz range.In doing so, this would achieve speeds four times that achievable under the 5G wireless communication standard.Labelled an ‘end-to-end transmitter-receiver’ by its creators, the 4.4mm sq silicon chip is capable of processing digital signals significantly faster and more energy-efficiently because of its unique digital-analog architecture.Payam Heydari, senior author of this latest research, said he and his colleagues refer to it as the ‘beyond 5G chip’ as it would be capable of bringing the speeds of fibre-optic networks wirelessly. “If such a possibility could come to fruition, it would transform the telecommunications industry, because wireless infrastructure brings about many advantages over wired systems,” Heydari said.No need for miles of cabling With the US Federal Communications Commission recently opening up new frequency bands above 100GHz, the researchers said that their transceiver is the first to provide end-to-end capabilities in this part of the spectrum.Much of the technology that will soon be integral to our infrastructure – such as the internet of things, autonomous vehicles and industry 4.0 – will work at unprecedented speeds at this spectrum.One of the researchers’ biggest hurdles in development was in changing frequencies of signals through modulation and demodulation in transceivers.Traditionally this has been done using digital processing, but recent discoveries have shown that this method has physical limitations. “Moore’s law says we should be able to increase the speed of transistors – such as those you would find in transmitters and receivers – by decreasing their size, but that’s not the case anymore,” Heydari said. “You cannot break electrons in two, so we have approached the levels that are governed by the physics of semiconductor devices.” To get around this problem, they utilised a chip architecture that significantly relaxes digital processing requirements by modulating the digital bits in the analog and radio-frequency domains.Its design also consumes much less energy than current systems allowing for their widespread adoption in consumer electronics.The paper’s co-author, Huan Wang, said: “Our innovation eliminates the need for miles of fibre-optic cables in data centres, so data farm operators can do ultra-fast wireless transfer and save considerable money on hardware, cooling and power.” . The post This game-changing chip can process data four times faster than 5G appeared first on Silicon Republic .'

New watchdog for Government’s climate action progress established

Entrepreneur Silicon Republic

A new Climate Action Delivery Board will act as a watchdog looking over Government departments to see if they’re sticking to agreed changes.
'Following the publication of the Climate Action Plan last month , the Government has now established the Climate Action Delivery Board.Its purpose is to act as a watchdog over the various departments to monitor their implementation of more than 180 actions set out in the plan.These actions include efforts to have approximately 1m electric vehicles on Irish roads by 2030 and having Ireland carbon neutral by 2050.Convened for the first time today (16 July), the board will report directly to An Taoiseach Leo Varadkar, TD and will be chaired jointly by the Secretary General to the Government and the Secretary General of the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment.Reports on the departments’ progress must be published on a quarterly basis.The Board will also discuss and review key strategic projects and areas of work, such as establishing a new model for retrofitting, to identify barriers, challenges and key lessons to date.Holding departments accountable The Government said that the Board’s establishment is the first in a series of new governance arrangements set out in the Climate Action Plan.These also include carbon-proofing policies, establishment of carbon budgets, a strengthened Climate Change Advisory Council and greater accountability to the Oireachtas. “With our recently published Climate Action Plan, we set out how we will drive forward climate actions that reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, as well as climate actions that will give us warmer homes, cleaner air, better quality of life,” Varadkar said. “The climate actions that will create the jobs and businesses of the future.We have dealt with environmental threats in the past like the depletion of the ozone layer and acid rain and I am confident we can overcome this threat also.” Minister Richard Bruton, TD added that the new Board will “ensure that each department and public body is held fully accountable to delivering on the actions required to enable Ireland [to] achieve its 2030 climate target and put us on a trajectory to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.This is the same model we used for the Action Plan for Jobs and it proved extremely effective.” . The post New watchdog for Government’s climate action progress established appeared first on Silicon Republic .'

Have you thought about a career in autotech?

Entrepreneur Silicon Republic

Reinventing the wheel (or wheels, as it were) is no easy feat.
'The invention of the car revolutionised travel and, by extension, completely upended the existing structures of society.It ushered in a wave of change, one of many seminal transformations that occurred during the industrial revolution.Now, however, there is another revolution imminent, brought on both by innovation and exigent circumstance in equal measure.Artificial intelligence (AI) has been termed by many as the most significant technological milestone since electricity was adopted.It is already permeating much of society and its presence will only grow more significant with time.Alongside this, you have the looming threat of global heating.The ongoing climate crisis has made it all the more vital that the world begins relying on more sustainable forms of energy.Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) has given itself the rather Herculean task of incorporating AI into the production of its new automobiles, set to be the next generation of transportation that will be powered by electricity and steered by this cutting-edge technology.It’s not easy.It’s essentially like reinventing the wheel – or wheels, more like. “As we transition to a data-drive company, we’re looking across the business to see where we can apply data and machine-learning techniques to solve some of the more complex engineering challenges,” explained Paul Heraty, senior manager for the AI team at JLR, speaking to Siliconrepublic.com at the company’s base in Shannon.The ever-evolving challenges this kind of technology brings up mean that, in turn, his days are genuinely diverse.He could be grappling with engine calibration one moment and the application of reinforcement learning for vehicle motion control the next. “To be a software engineer here, you really have to understand what the challenges, and what we’re trying to solve in JLR, are.Our key areas that we’re looking to solve are things like autonomous driving electrification and connectivity.” In Shannon, JLR is hiring for roles in areas such as ADAS (advanced driver assistance systems), functional safety, cybersecurity, electrical vehicle architecture and embedded software engineering.Heraty added: “In general, what we need are people with strong C and C++ skills.Exposure to embedded operating systems like Linux and QNX are very beneficial.” He added that experience working in production software environments and tooling is a plus.To hear the full interview with Heraty, check out the video above. . The post Have you thought about a career in autotech? appeared first on Silicon Republic .'

Efforts to halt ozone depletion could be scuppered by super volcanoes

Entrepreneur Silicon Republic

Researchers believe that while humans are reversing ozone reduction, erupting super volcanoes could drastically interrupt its recovery.
'Last year it was revealed that humanity’s efforts to shrink the massive hole in the ozone layer was working.This ozone hole, first discovered above Antarctica in 1985, led nations to ban the use of chemical chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in 1987, with this action decades later showing a 20pc reduction in the size of the hole.However, while this success could lead to an ozone layer the size similar to what it was in 1980 by 2050, scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences warn that cataclysmic natural events could seriously interrupt this.In a paper published to Advances in Atmospheric Sciences , the researchers pinpointed the potential damage caused by super volcanoes based on a transport and chemistry-climate model jointly developed with Russian scientists.These simulated the impacts of super volcano eruptions on the stratospheric ozone during different ozone recovery periods.This showed that the total global mean column ozone depletion in a scenario with half the amount of harmful substances of the 1990s was at approximately 6pc, or 6.4pc in the tropics.When all ozone depleting substances produced by humans are eliminated and only natural sources remain, a super volcano would reduce the planet’s ozone layer by 2.5pc, or 4.4pc in the tropics.The researchers’ concern is that since super volcanic eruptions might inject large quantities of halogen into the atmosphere – which directly destroys ozone in the stratosphere – the true scale of depletion could be substantially higher than their estimates.The big problem remaining for science is that current observations and studies can’t provide enough information on how much halogens enter the stratosphere.The researchers have also theorised that, based on these findings, super volcanoes could have significantly influenced the evolution of life on our planet.During the Palaeozoic era, super volcanic eruptions occurring during a period when the ozone layer was relatively thin and weak could have destroyed it entirely.However, the researchers stressed that such questions require further investigation. . The post Efforts to halt ozone depletion could be scuppered by super volcanoes appeared first on Silicon Republic .'

UK photo and film equipment marketplace raises €10m

Entrepreneur Silicon Republic

MPB has a fast-growing community of over 135,000 users.
'UK start-up MPB announced today (15 July) that it has closed a £9m (€10m) Series C funding round, led by growth VC firm Acton Capital, and with participation from existing investors Mobeus and Beringea.MPB is a platform for trading and selling high-end photography and filmmaking kits, which, less than 18 months ago closed its Series B funding round.CEO Matt Barker expects more success in future: “The market for professional photo gear has grown in each of the past two years thanks to significant technological developments such as mirrorless cameras.MPB is capitalising on this trend by enabling professionals and enthusiasts to access the latest kit in a far more affordable way.” Eyal Malinger, investment director at Beringea said: “MPB’s growth since Beringea first invested in 2017 has been significant, with immediate and substantial traction in new markets in the US and Germany. “Our continued support of the business, along with the new investment from Acton, is testament to the potential of the business to become a lasting success on both sides of the Atlantic and it will kick off an important chapter of accelerating growth.” Jane Reoch, investment director at Mobeus Equity Partners acknowledged the 280pc growth MPB has witnessed over the last two years and said: “The re-commerce model continues to prove hugely successful with customers who enjoy both economic and environmental benefits of reuse.We are excited to back MPB’s high performing team in the next stage of growth and to welcome Acton to the Board.” With 135,000 active users, the platform offers a selection of verified second-hand equipment to photographers and videographers around the world.The site ensures that the pricing accurately reflects the value of the 4,500 products featured on the site, by using data points generated on the platform every day.With headquarters in Brighton and an operational site in East Sussex, the company is already active in the UK, USA and Germany.Baker said: “With the new capital, we will open the first MPB operational centre in Brooklyn, US and are planning a German site to follow in 2020.We intend on becoming the leading global platform for photographers and filmmakers to trade professional equipment.” MPB also announced plans to use the funding to invest in engineering and further automation of processes on the platform.The company currently employs 120 people across the UK and US. . The post UK photo and film equipment marketplace raises €10m appeared first on Silicon Republic .'

Fernano Corbató, father of the computer password, has died

Entrepreneur Silicon Republic

One of the pioneers of infosec and father of the computer password, Fernando ‘Corby’ Corbató, has died at the age of 93.
'Decades before the existence of concepts like cybersecurity and the cloud, Fernando ‘Corby’ Corbató led the development of one of the world’s first computer operating systems: Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS). This allowed multiple people to use a computer at the same time to significantly increase the speed and is widely credited as the first system to use passwords.Now, MIT – where much of this work was undertaken – has announced that Corbató has died at the age of 93. “Corby was one of the most important researchers for making computing available to many people for many purposes,” said his long-time colleague Tom Van Vleck. “He saw that these concepts don’t just make things more efficient; they fundamentally change the way people use information.” Born in Oakland, California in 1927, Corbató enlisted in the US Navy during WWII at the age of 17 where he developed his engineering skills working on a range of radar and sonar systems.After the war, he earned a bachelor’s degree in at the California Institute of Technology before heading to MIT to do a PhD in physics.Before the introduction of CTSS – first demonstrated in 1961 – computer users would have to create programs on cards and submit them in batches to an operator who would have to enter into a system.This process would often take hours and if a minor error was left in the code, the entire sequence would have to be repeated.Fernando Corbató surrounded by computers in 1965.Image: MIT CSAIL He ‘transformed computers as we know them today’ However, when CTSS was introduced, answers could be returned in a matter of seconds and helped open up communication between users with early versions of email, instant messaging and word processing.Aside from significantly improving computer efficiency, the operating system also helped establish the very notion of computer privacy.With different users wanting to keep their own files private, CTSS introduced the idea of having people create individual accounts with personal passwords.Another legacy of the man was something referred to as ‘Corbató’s law which states that the number of lines of code someone can write in a day is the same regardless of the language used.Daniela Rus, director of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory ( CSAIL ) lab that Corbató helped develop said: “It’s no overstatement to say that Corby’s work on time-sharing fundamentally transformed computers as we know them today. “From PCs to smartphones, the digital revolution can directly trace its roots back to the work that he led at MIT nearly 60 years ago.” . The post Fernano Corbató, father of the computer password, has died appeared first on Silicon Republic .'

NASA invests $73m to bring 3D printing to space

Entrepreneur Silicon Republic

It will be at least 2022 by the time NASA deploys the technology, but if its first mission is successful it could be a 'game-changer'.
'On Friday (12 July), NASA announced  it had made the first step towards implementing a major strategy it has been considering for a number of years.Instead of spending a great deal of time and resources bringing a variety of items to space, the American National Aeronautics and Space Administration plans to construct these items in space using 3D printing technology . This technology will also allow NASA to deliver items to space that had previously been considered far too large to transport.The 3D printers will also be able to take over some of the tasks currently performed by astronauts, removing some of the safety risks that currently exist, and allowing astronauts to prioritise other tasks.To achieve this goal, NASA has awarded a $73.7m (€64.9m) contract to Californian company Made In Space, Inc.This partnership aims to demonstrate the ability of a small spacecraft, called Archinaut One, to manufacture and assemble spacecraft components in low-Earth orbit.NASA believe this could be instrumental in expanding human space travel to Mars.According to NASA, this contract is the start of the second phase of a partnership established through NASA’s Tipping Point solicitation: “The public-private partnership combines NASA resources with an industry contribution of at least 25pc of the programme costs, shepherding the development of critical space technologies while also saving the agency, and American taxpayers, money.” At some stage in 2022 or later, NASA will launch Archinaut One from New Zealand.When it reaches low-Earth orbit, the spacecraft will perform its first test, which involves printing two beams that extend 10 metres out from each side of the spacecraft.In its blog, NASA explained: “As manufacturing progresses, each beam will unfurl two solar arrays that generate as much as five times more power than traditional solar panels on spacecraft of a similar size.” You can see a demonstration of this process here . Associate administrator of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate Jim Reuter called it “an unquestionable game-changer”. NASA concluded that if Archinaut One is successful in its first mission, it could lead to huge advancements down the road. . The post NASA invests $73m to bring 3D printing to space appeared first on Silicon Republic .'