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Kimi Raikkonen Reveals the Secret to Avoiding Talking to Others

Music Essentially Sports

Alfa Romeo driver Kimi Raikkonen is undoubtedly one of the funniest drivers on the Formula One grid, without even trying.Earlier, the Alfa Romeo team posted a video where Raikkonen was discussing his music tastes.He revealed that he likes listening
'Alfa Romeo driver Kimi Raikkonen is undoubtedly one of the funniest drivers on the Formula One grid, without even trying.Earlier, the Alfa Romeo team posted a video where Raikkonen was discussing his music tastes.He revealed that he likes listening to Finnish music, but has not particular preference.He then went on the speak about himself listening to music during the driver’s parade ahead of each race.That was when he revealed his little secret, where he simply plugs in his earphones.It gives off the impression that he was listening to music and nobody should talk to him.What does Kimi listen to on his headsets before the race…? #FrenchGP pic.twitter.com/Wsm1WqABuV — Alfa Romeo Racing (@alfaromeoracing) June 23, 2019 Interestingly, a number of athletes often listen to music as it ‘gets them in the zone’. Needless to say, it definitely got Kimi Raikkonen in the zone, as he finished in the points.The Finnish veteran ended the French Grand Prix in 7th place after Daniel Ricciardo was penalised.Speaking after the race, he said,  “I was a bit disappointed to miss out on Q3 yesterday, but we knew it would be much better to start on different tyres than the softs, and so it was.I didn’t make the best start but luckily I didn’t lose too much on the straight and I could fight back in the next few corners.” “We were in a strong position after the start, on the hard tyres, but I had to hold back Hulkenberg the whole race.It was a great battle with the Renaults for most of the afternoon and in the end I was able to catch up with the cars in front.The last few laps were very intense and it was good fun.” “It’s really good that we could fight against other cars in the midfield and be up there.We had the speed and we got a good result in the end.” . The post Kimi Raikkonen Reveals the Secret to Avoiding Talking to Others appeared first on Essentially Sports .'

Watch: In Hashback Hashish’s song ‘Danse’, the Indian woman turns a black-and-white day red

Music Scroll

The video follows a woman unleashing her fury after being pushed to the edge by the everyday swarm of leering Indian men.
'The music video for Hashback Hashish’s Danse , released on Thursday on YouTube, follows a woman stepping out of her home in Delhi and encountering a swarm of men along the way getting a rise out of staring at her. This could just be a daily affair for her, till one day, she hits back. When confronted, the men are embarrassed to look into her eyes. Stark black-and-white visuals are intercut with the woman – played by actor and dancer Puneet Jewandah – dancing in a dark room with red strobe lights. The video has been directed by Surabhi Tandon, and Nitish Kanjilal is the editor. Hashback Hasish is the moniker under which Ashish Sachan makes and releases electronic music. He has released several albums and EPs so far, in addition to being featured on albums such as Lifafa’s self-titled debut release . When Sachan wanted the Danse music video to be “about the experience of being a woman”, Tandon told Scroll.in , she realised that the experience is anything but positive in India. “So I wanted to straddle a storyline that many women can relate to, while still leaving it open ended enough to not arrive at a dead end,” Tandon said. “Equally,.. Read more'

Listen: Meerabai’s ‘Mat Ja Jogi’ interpreted by Mallikarjun Mansur, Bismillah Khan and other greats

Music Scroll

Another episode in a series featuring Hindustani classical musicians performing bhajans.
'Maestro Omkarnath Thakur’s rendition of the bhajan Mat Ja Jogi featured in this column last week may have taken a few Hindustani music aficionados by surprise. They may not have expected the inclusion of a bhajan in a Hindustani music recital, and that too, a rendition that lasted a good 20 minutes or so. Of course, this was probably from a concert that was held in the 1950s when concerts featuring one main performer and his or her ensemble lasted for at least three hours or thereabouts, and so 20 minutes in a relatively long concert would not seem out of place. But continuing with more interpretations of the same bhajan written by the sixteenth century saint-poet Meerabai, today’s episode has some more surprises for those Hindustani music lovers who cannot bear to listen to genres like thumri, dadra, bhajan, or ghazal. The melodic composition remains the same as the one we heard last week, but in some cases the taal changes. We begin with an interpretation that has a sense of urgency reflected in the liberal use of taans or swift melodic patterns and tihais. This is sung by Vinayakbuwa Patwardhan, who like Omkarnath Thakur was a senior disciple of music educationist and vocalist Vishnu.. Read more'