{{ 'Go back' | translate}}
Njus logo

News from Israel

India’s vote against NGO not linked with Palestinian cause: MEA

Law and Order Daily Excelsior

NEW DELHI: India’s vote in the UN’s ECOSOC against a Palestinian NGO should not in any way be construed as a vote against the Palestinian cause, the External Affairs Ministry said on Thursday.
'NEW DELHI: India’s vote in the UN’s ECOSOC against a Palestinian NGO should not in any way be construed as a vote against the Palestinian cause, the External Affairs Ministry said on Thursday.In a rare move, India on June 6 voted in favour of Israel in the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) to deny the Palestinian non-governmental organisation ‘Shahed’ the observer status, after Israel said the organisation did not disclose its ties with Hamas.MEA spokesperson Raveesh Kumar said the vote should not be in any way be construed as a vote against the Palestinian cause. “We voted in favour of a proposal which was submitted by Israel at the Economic and Social Council of the UN for further scrutiny by the committee on NGOs.The proposal was submitted by Israel based on information that the NGO allegedly has close contacts with terrorist organisations,” he said. (AGENCIES)     . The post India’s vote against NGO not linked with Palestinian cause: MEA appeared first on Jammu Kashmir Latest News | Tourism | Breaking News J&K .'

Your social media feeds are proof that NYT’s decision to scrap cartoons won’t affect the art form

Art and Exhibitions Scroll

Globalisation and technology have changed the business of cartooning.
'The New York Times has announced it will no longer be running daily political cartoons in its international edition, amid continuing controversy over anti-Semitism in its pages. This brings the international paper in line with the domestic edition, which stopped featuring daily political cartoons several years ago . It follows an earlier decision to end syndicated cartooning. Syndicates represent collectives of cartoonists, looking to have work placed in a variety of publications. The Times said that a “ faulty process and lack of oversight ” led to a syndicated cartoon of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Donald Trump – which was condemned by many as anti-Semitic – slipping through the net on April 25. Disgraceful anti-Semitic cartoon in @nytimes once again displays the shameful essence of this rag. Anti-Catholic. Anti-cop. Anti-Israel. Just the worst. pic.twitter.com/F0CmiAN094 — Rep. Pete King (@RepPeteKing) April 28, 2019 The decision has caused international consternation and prompted doom-laden predictions about the death of cartooning or even of free speech itself. The paper’s former in-house cartoonists – Patrick Chappatte and Heng Kim Song – have taken to Twitter and the web to defend their careers and their profession. But this decision should be seen less an overreaction by a newspaper frightened of all things bad press, than a wake-up call. It’s a moment to acknowledge the new realities of cartooning, globally.. Read more'

China, India And Pakistan increasing size of Nuclear arsenals: Report

Military Kashmir Reader

STOCKHOLM: The overall number of nuclear warheads in the world has declined in the past year but nations are modernising their arsenals, a report published Monday said. At the start of 2019, the United States, Russia, Britain, France, China, India,
'STOCKHOLM:  The overall number of nuclear warheads in the world has declined in the past year but nations are modernising their arsenals, a report published Monday said. At the start of 2019, the United States, Russia, Britain, France, China, India, Pakistan, Israel and North Korea had a total of some 13,865 nuclear weapons, according to estimates in a new report by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI). That represents a decrease of 600 nuclear weapons compared to the start of 2018. But at the same time all nuclear weapon-possessing countries are modernising these arms – and China, India and Pakistan are also increasing the size of their arsenals. “The world is seeing fewer but newer weapons,” Shannon Kile, director of the SIPRI Nuclear Arms Control Programme and one of the report’s authors, told AFP. The drop in recent years can mainly be attributed to the US and Russia, whose combined arsenals still make up more than 90 per cent of the world’s nuclear weapons. This is in part due to the countries fulfilling their obligations under the New START treaty – which puts a cap on the number of deployed warheads and was signed by the US and Russia in 2010 – as well as getting rid of obsolete warheads from the Cold War era. The START treaty is however due to expire in 2021, which Kile said was worrying since there are currently “no serious discussions underway about extending it”. Next year the treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) — considered the cornerstone of the world’s nuclear order — turns 50. The number of nuclear arms has been drastically reduced since a peak in the mid-1980s when there were some 70,000 nuclear warheads in the world. While Kile said progress should not be underestimated, he also noted a number of worrying trends, such as the build-up of nuclear arms on both sides of the border between India and Pakistan, and the danger of a conventional conflict escalating to a nuclear one. There is also a more general trend towards an “increased salience” of nuclear weapons, where changing strategic doctrines, particularly in the US, are giving nuclear weapons an expanded role in both military operations and national security dialogue, Kile said. “I think the trend is moving away from where we were five years ago, where the world’s nuclear weapons were being marginalised,” Kile said. Former UN chief Ban Ki-moon recently urged nuclear powers to “get serious” about disarmament and warned there was a “very real risk” that decades of work on international arms control could collapse following the US pullout of the Iran nuclear deal, which he said sent the wrong signal to North Korea. Global disarmament efforts also suffered a blow when the United States announced in February it would withdraw from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty, prompting Russia to say it would also suspend its participation. (Agencies)'

The big news: Monsoon Session of Parliament to begin today, and nine other top stories

Politics Scroll

Other headlines: Rohit Sharma’s 140 helped India defeat Pakistan at the 2019 Cricket World Cup, and the toll in the encephalitis outbreak in Bihar reached 93.
'A look at the headlines right now: Monsoon Session of Parliament begins today; triple talaq bill, Aadhaar ordinance on agenda: Parliament will also have to ratify a central decision to extend President’s Rule in Jammu and Kashmir for six months. Rohit Sharma’s majestic ton helps India extend winning streak against hapless Pakistan in World Cups: Here are all the stats from the India-Pakistan game. Toll from encephalitis reaches 93 in Bihar, Union health minister faces protests in Muzaffarpur hospital: People demonstrated against inadequate facilities at the hospital and alleged negligence on the part of hospital staff. Bengal’s protesting doctors say CM is free to choose venue for talks but should be open to media: The protestors had earlier turned down Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee’s offer of talks behind closed doors. Eight killed as car hits truck on Yamuna Expressway in Mathura in Uttar Pradesh: The car is suspected to have been travelling at a high speed and hit the rear of the truck. Wife of Israel PM Netanyahu admits to misusing state funds, has to pay fine : Sara Netanyahu will escape a conviction of aggravated fraud, but will need to pay a fine of more than Rs 10 lakh and will have a criminal record. Congress needs ‘major surgery’ , Rahul Gandhi needs to take charge, says Veerappa Moily: The veteran Congress leader said that Gandhi must.. Read more'