{{ 'Go back' | translate}}
Njus logo

News from Dundee

Lisbon Lions – From mortals to immortals

Football Essentially Sports

Memory is a strange, selective business.Before the 1967 European Cup final, Jock Stein showed his Celtic team, a film of Real Madrid’s magical 7-3 rout of Eintracht Frankfurt.
'Memory is a strange, selective business.Before the 1967 European Cup final, Jock Stein showed his Celtic team, a film of Real Madrid’s magical 7-3 rout of Eintracht Frankfurt.Billy McNeill, who captained Celtic when they defeated Internazionale, to become the first British winners of club football’s greatest prize had no recollection of this inspirational ploy, yet the saga of the Lisbon Lions’ dentures remains vivid in his mind. “Several of the boys wore false teeth, and our keeper, Ronnie Simpson, used to keep them in his bunnet [cap] and leave them in the back of the net.We were back in the dressing-room with the cup when Bobby Lennox suddenly said: ‘Where’s the teeth?’ “The funny thing is that they were still lying there, even after the over 12,000 Celtic fans had poured on to the park.They’d grabbed whatever souvenirs they could, but overlooked this old cap.Otherwise there would have been some middle-aged Scot today boasting that he’d got the Lisbon Lions’ teeth!” Of that there can be no doubt.Ninety minutes of football, fought out long ago in a distant arena, still exudes a powerful mystique for many Scots.Not having been born when McNeill raised the giant trophy is no bar to reliving the glory.At a dinner to mark the 20th anniversary, McNeill received such an ovation that the board felt compelled to bring him back for a second spell as manager of the club with whom he won 23 glorious medals. “I don’t think you’ll ever get a situation like that again,” McNeill reflects. “We won the European Cup with what was effectively a Glasgow district XI.Apart from Bobby Lennox, who’s from Saltcoats, 30 miles away, we were all from within 15 miles of Celtic Park.Nowadays, with freedom of contract, we’d have been picked off.Celtic “Scottish football was good at that time.Our clubs regularly went long distances in Europe; not just Celtic and Rangers, but Kilmarnock, Dundee and Dunfermline, too.We’ve lost our way since then, perhaps because money is too easily squandered in a small country like ours and because we don’t work hard enough at our game. “We’ve lost aspects of our football that were attractive and successful.We had pride and passion, but also great creative players like Bobby Murdoch and Bertie Auld plus skilful dribblers like Jimmy Johnstone, and not just at Celtic.” Stein’s Celtic were definitely ruling the game, their most enduring symbol was the rock-like McNeill.His towering header won the first trophy of the era, the Scottish Cup in 1965.A similar effort saw off Yugoslavia’s Vojvodina Novi Sad in the final seconds of the quarter- final, one of two moments that season, which convinced him that destiny was surely favoring him “The other was when Stevie Chalmers got the winner in Lisbon.Joe McBride was our top scorer but he’d picked up a bad knee injury at Aberdeen.That was the only reason Stevie was playing, which always makes me wonder about fate.” Despite a clean sweep in the domestic front, Celtic flew to the Portuguese capital as undisputed underdogs.The Champions’ Cup was the preserve of the Latin nations.Some of the European media portrayed the Scots as innocents abroad, out for a few days’ sunbathing.Stein, a stickler for discipline, knew better. “We had a beautiful hotel with a fantastic swimming pool, but Jock believed the heat would tire us out so he limited the time we spent out there,” McNeill explains. “He kept stressing that we weren’t on holiday.” The regime did allow some unconventional behaviour.The night before the final, McNeill and his colleagues took up an invitation from a Scottish expatriate to walk to his villa and watch England play Spain on TV. “Neilly Mochan [the trainer] was with us and he was legendary for getting lost.We ended up wandering through woods and clambering over rocks in the dark.With hindsight it was crazy, though it took our minds off the match and eased the tension.” In fact it was Inter, over-dependent on cynical defence, who were probably under greater pressure.If Celtic had lost, McNeill is convinced people would have applauded them for simply reaching the final.The main goal of Stein’s team talk was to enjoy themselves. “I know it’s a cliche, but it was right for us.He also used the fact that Inter had reneged on an agreement about who’d train first in the stadium.The chip on the shoulder works for us Scots.” The image of the teams waiting in the tunnel compounds the retrospective incongruity of it all for McNeill. “The contrast was incredible.They had all these lovely, lyrical names like Alessandro Mazzola, Giacinto Facchetti.We had Murdoch and Auld.They had tanned legs and faces, like models.We were all gums and pale skin. “Then Bertie started us all singing: ‘It’s a grand old team to play for’. The Italians were bemused, possibly even a little intimidated.” Although Inter scored from the spot in the opening minutes, it was they who proved to be toothless.Their disinclination to try to add to the lead enabled the hooped shirts to build up an irresistible momentum. “They thought one goal would do it,” McNeill remembers. “They didn’t appreciate the quality of our players, so they allowed us a lot of possession.We probed and probed – it was a siege – but we kept hitting the woodwork and had a blatant penalty turned down.” At half-time, Stein had instructed Celtic to forget any sense of injustice over Inter’s goal.McNeill can still hear him urging: “Just get out and play.” Ironically, the goalkeeper identified by Stein as a weak link, Giuliano Sarti, was in inspired form.Sarti had as much chance of stopping Tommy Gemmell’s brutally struck equaliser, midway through the second half, as of catching a bullet.And he was helpless when, with five minutes left, Chalmers diverted Murdoch’s drive: 2-1. “I steeled myself for an onslaught, but it never came.Inter were knackered because they’d had to do so much covering and chasing.It was 85 degrees but we were extremely fit and adept at keeping the ball.” While the scoreline scarcely reflected Celtic’s superiority, the manner of their success enchanted a Continent.A French reporter dubbed them “L’Orage” – the storm – while a Swiss commentator hailed their “alchemy of will and technical brilliance”. An alliterative Scottish scribe labelled them the Lisbon Lions, presumably grateful that the final had not gone to Zagreb.The last blast of the whistle had come with Stein on walkabout, unable to look.Soon he was engulfed by delirious fans. “There was a six-foot moat,” McNeill recalls, “but, with that kind of elation, a wee bit of water wasn’t going to hold them back.” After retreating to their changing room, where Liverpool’s Bill Shankly told Stein he was now “immortal”, Celtic went out to collect their trophy and their teeth.The green party was only just beginning.Glasgow belonged to Celtic.The bus came on to the tarmac at the airport and crawled to Celtic Park through crowded streets.There were 65,000 inside as the squad, led by an Irish accordion band, took the cheers from the back of a lorry.One man scaled a floodlight pylon for a better view.When McNeill finally settled down, he saw the pictures of a deserted city centre at kick-off time.It tickles him to think even the Rangers supporters must have been watching.If the celebrations are tinged with sadness for Caesar it is because they find Celtic riven by internal strife in the forlorn pursuit of Rangers; and because Stein and Mochan are not around to join in.A grainy old clip which featured in Hugh McIlvanney’s homage to Stein, Shankly and Busby stirred memories of that heady spring for McNeill.It showed Stein and his youthful charges receiving the Team of the Year trophy from the BBC’s Sportsview programme. “Though it was a British award, we tended to consider it an English thing, and Jock made a point of saying we’d won it for Scotland.I’d forgotten that Matt [Busby] made the presentation, and that Jock said he hoped Manchester United went on to win the European Cup themselves.Which they did, but Celtic were there first.” . The post Lisbon Lions – From mortals to immortals appeared first on Essentially Sports .'

Antibiotics can increase nerve damage risk

Public Protection Orissa POST

London: A common class of antibiotics — used to treat respiratory and urinary tract infections — may increase a patient’s risk of suffering a serious and potentially permanent form of nerve damage by almost 50 per cent. Scientists from the
'London: A common class of antibiotics — used to treat respiratory and urinary tract infections — may increase a patient’s risk of suffering a serious and potentially permanent form of nerve damage by almost 50 per cent. Scientists from the University of Dundee in the UK looked at a database of 1.3 million adults issued one or more prescriptions of fluoroquinolone or amoxicillin-clavulanate antibiotics with no diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy at the outset of treatment. Peripheral neuropathy has long been recognised as a potential side effect of fluoroquinolone antibiotics — that are commonly used to treat a variety of illnesses such as respiratory and urinary tract infections. The study, published in the journal JAMA Neurology, found that current use of systemic fluoroquinolone antibiotics appeared to increase the risk of peripheral neuropathy by 47 per cent, causing an additional 2.4 cases per 10,000 patients per year of treatment. A person prescribed with amoxicillin-clavulanate were not significantly more likely to experience peripheral neuropathy. The risk was higher for men and rose with age and with the length of fluoroquinolone treatment. A peripheral neuropathy diagnosis remained more likely to be diagnosed for up to six months after the fluoroquinolone prescription. Older men, the group most likely to experience the condition after taking a 28-day course of fluoroquinolones, were said to have a one in 34,000 chance of doing so. While the absolute risk of a peripheral neuropathy diagnosis remained low, the findings should still be considered as one of the different potential side effects before prescribing antibiotics, researchers said. “The safety of fluoroquinolone antibiotics has received a lot of attention regarding their potential to cause long-term side effects in some people,” said Daniel Morales, from the University of Dundee. “One of these is peripheral neuropathy where nerves, most commonly affecting the lower limbs, can be affected, leading to numbness, pain, or problems with balance,” Morales said in a statement. “Fluoroquinolones are effective antibiotics but health care professionals should recognise that peripheral neuropathy may rarely occur following fluoroquinolone therapy,” he said. “We observed that treatment with fluoroquinolones could increase the risk of peripheral neuropathy by around 50 per cent and that this risk may last for up to six months following treatment,” he said. PTI'

IIT-Bhubaneswar gets Rs 6.18cr SPARC projects boost

School and Education Orissa POST

Bhubaneswar: The IIT-Bhubaneswar got the approval to as many as 11 research proposals out of the 25 submitted to the Ministry of Human Resources Development (HRD) worth Rs 6.18 crore under a new initiative by the ministry. The initiative ‘Scheme for
'Bhubaneswar: The IIT-Bhubaneswar got the approval to as many as 11 research proposals out of the 25 submitted to the Ministry of Human Resources Development (HRD) worth Rs 6.18 crore under a new initiative by the ministry.The initiative ‘Scheme for Promotion of Academic and Research Collaboration’ (SPARC), promoted by the HRD Ministry, is aimed at improving academic and research collaborations between Indian institutions and the best of institutions in the world to jointly solve problems of national and international relevance.Revealing more about the initiative, IIT-Bhubaneswar Director R V Raja Kumar said, “SPARC will help us forging new relations with reputed research groups across the globe. At IIT-Bhubaneswar we have been encouraging our faculty members to forge such relationships and hence there has been very enthusiastic response towards submitting proposals.”The 11 approved proposals are in the key areas such as green and renewable technologies, affordable healthcare, energy and water sustainability, advanced sensors, electronics communications, and technologies for forensics, security and safety.The SPARC grants will help the premier institution to collaborate with international universities from the U K, USA, Singapore and New Zealand along with world-class faculties and researchers from across the globe to undertake joint research and offer short-term courses to the students.“Some of the very notable universities with which IIT-Bhubaneswar through SPARC will partner are University of Dundee, Brunel University, UK, University of Minds, Chicago, University of Minnesota, University of California, New York University, USA, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and the University of Auckland, New Zealand,” Kumar added.Meanwhile, IIT-Kharagpur has been given the responsibility of being the national coordinator with other nodal Institutes of India and has invited a lot of proposals from all the IITs. The scheme plans to support about 600 such joint collaborations across 100 Indian institutions over a period of two years with a total budget of Rs 418 crore.'

Police warning over on-the-run Castle Huntly prisoner

Public Protection EavesRock

Image copyright Police Scotland Image caption Sean Bonar was granted home leave from Castle Huntly prison Members of the public have been warned not to approach a 29-year-old prisoner who is on the run from HMP Castle Huntly near Dundee.
' Image copyright Police Scotland Image caption Sean Bonar was granted home leave from Castle Huntly prison Members of the public have been warned not to approach a 29-year-old prisoner who is on the run from HMP Castle Huntly near Dundee.Sean Bonar failed to return to the jail after being released on licence for a home visit on Monday.Police have appealed for information to help trace the prisoner, who is believed to have connections in the Glasgow area.He is described as 5ft 9in tall, of average build with short dark hair. Source link . The post Police warning over on-the-run Castle Huntly prisoner appeared first on EavesRock.'

Tisca Chopra: Direction is the next logical step forward for me after acting

Movies Bollywoodlife.com

Tisca Chopra, who is making her directorial debut says direction was the next logical step forward for her after acting in films over 26 years
'Actress Tisca Chopra, who is making her directorial debut with a yet untitled thriller film, says direction was the next logical step forward for her after acting in films over 26 years. Tisca was interacting with the media at a special screening of Oscar-winning film \'Free Solo\' here on Tuesday. The actress, who had earlier acted in and co-written the acclaimed short film \'Chutney\', will now be helming a \'twisted, dark and bitingly funny\' movie. Revealing the genre of the film, Tisca said: \'It's a thriller film.\' Asked if she feels under pressure as it is her first film as a director, she said: \'I don't know. I am just doing my work and I am not thinking about the pressure right now. I guess it is the next logical step forward for me after acting. So I am feeling really happy and excited about it.\' \'Free Solo\' won the Best Documentary at both the Oscars and the BAFTAs. It will release across theatres on Friday across key metros such as New Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru, Chennai, Ahmedabad and Chandigarh. Tisca said that as someone living in India, she gets to see such films usually when she travels abroad or courtesy film festivals and a platform like National Geographic, which has brought \'Free Solo\' here. \'There are so many people who want to watch stuff. We can watch a lot of content on Netflix and Amazon Prime Video, but it's a different experience to watch it in a theatre with proper picture quality, sound and people. It's a very collective experience and I love that.\' \'Free Solo\' is a portrait of the free soloist climber Alex Honnold as he prepares to achieve his lifelong dream -- climbing the face of the world's most famous rock.   Would Tisca like to feature in an adventure-thriller film? She said: \'I would love do an adventure film. There was one film which used to be my favourite was 'Crocodile Dundee', where they go all through these jungles and stuff. I am a very big white water rafting enthusiast and I am a motor sport enthusiast. I also took part in Himalayan car rally. So yeah, if anything comes up on these lines, I definitely want to be a part of it.\' Tisca will also appear in the romantic comedy \'Good News\', where she will co-star with Akshay Kumar, Kareena Kapoor Khan, Diljit Dosanjh and Kiara Advani. She has finished shooting for the film.'

Scottish Championship: The league with half its teams in a relegation fight

Football EavesRock

With four games to play, half of the teams in the Scottish Championship are in a relegation fight.Even before erstwhile bottom side Alloa Athletic’s win at Morton on Tuesday, just four points separated five teams in the division.
' With four games to play, half of the teams in the Scottish Championship are in a relegation fight.Even before erstwhile bottom side Alloa Athletic’s win at Morton on Tuesday, just four points separated five teams in the division.But instead of edging themselves closer to safety, Morton have allowed themselves to be dragged back into the mix for the sole automatic relegation place and a play-off spot along with Queen of the South, Partick Thistle and Falkirk, who now find themselves in 10th.This time last year, the fate of winless Brechin City had long been decided, while the division’s only other part-time side Dumbarton were already eight points adrift of Falkirk in ninth as they headed for play-offs and, ultimately, relegation.Alloa replaced them and are the only part-time side in the second tier this term.Can they defy the odds and avoid automatic relegation, or a play-off semi-final against the fourth-best team in League One?BBC Scotland looks at the five teams’ prospects for what promises to be a nervy run-in.When Morton beat Ross County in their opening fixture of 2019, all seemed well at Cappielow.Jonatan Johansson had been in charge for four months and his side were now in fourth place, and maybe even dreaming of a tilt at promotion to the top flight.But the former Finland international’s side have since lost their way.A 15 point-gap between them and bottom side Falkirk has been cut to four points after a run of one win in their subsequent 12 games.Queens are another side to have suffered a slump since January – and another to do so after beating champions-elect County.A 4-0 win over the league leaders took the Dumfries side into fourth but, in an uncanny mirror image of Morton’s slump, Gary Naysmith’s men have also since only won one of 12 league games.At the same time, the goals have dried up for the Championship’s top scorer Stephen Dobbie, who has only two in his last nine appearances having netted 19 in his previous 20 matches.One thing in Queens’ favour, is that they have a significantly better goal difference than the rest.It looked ominous for the Championship’s only part-time team after a run of eight defeats in nine games left them three points adrift at the bottom just two weeks ago.However, three consecutive victories, culminating in Tuesday’s huge win at Morton, have lifted Jim Goodwin’s side back out of the bottom two.Thistle looked to be on track to save themselves after five successive wins amid a run of seven games undefeated took Gary Caldwell’s side out of the bottom two in mid-February.But after two wins in their next seven fixtures, they are back in the play-off spot but do have what could be a crucial game in hand over their four rivals.Manager Ray McKinnon left Morton for Falkirk on the final day of the August transfer window, sparking a prolonged dispute between the clubs.It looked like it would pay off for Falkirk, though, when they went eight games without defeat and lifted themselves off the bottom of the table after making a plethora of new signings in January.However, they are back down there again after five matches without a win – albeit only two have been defeats.‘It’ll go to the last game’ – analysisDunfermline Athletic midfielder James Craigen will face three of the five sides, starting on Saturday at home to his former club, Falkirk:Queen of the South have Stephen Dobbie, who is probably the best player in the league, while Alloa are on this fantastic run now.They are still in the mix, but they’ve given themselves a great chance.Brechin struggled as a part-time team last season, but Alloa have been the surprise package and have given us tough games, are a credit to the league and play some really good stuff as well.Falkirk and Partick Thistle made changes in January and have picked up form, but they are also still in the mix.With the teams all playing against each other, I think it will go to the last game of the season.Dundee United manager Robbie Neilson, whose side are currently second in the division and still have to face two of the bottom five:Jim Goodwin has probably been the best manager in the league this season.The way he is consistently getting results out of his Alloa team, who are part-time and are fighting against things, it’s phenomenal.If you look at the Championship over the past 10 years, they would easily be safe but it’s just the way the league is just now.Dundee United v Ayr United will be live on BBC Scotland and BBC Sport online on Friday 12 April (Kick-off, 19:05 BST). Source link . The post Scottish Championship: The league with half its teams in a relegation fight appeared first on EavesRock.'