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BMW Exec: “No way to tell” between FWD and RWD 1 Series

Traffic BMW BLOG

There’s a lot being said about the new BMW 1 Series and its switch to front-wheel drive, most of which isn’t great.
'There’s a lot being said about the new BMW 1 Series and its switch to front-wheel drive, most of which isn’t great.The idea of BMW using front-wheel drive is unpleasant enough to most BMW fans but when it comes as a replacement for one of the brand’s most beloved rear-wheel drive cars, it really hurts.The last-gen 1 Series was a rear-wheel drive hot-hatch, making it a unicorn in the segment.Now, the 1er is like every other hatchback, thanks to its front-drive layout.However, one BMW exec seems to think that the differences between the two will be minor at most.When speaking to Australia’s Which Car , BMW 1 Series spokesperson Florian Moser said “Driving a front-wheel or a rear-wheel drive car now, there is almost no way to tell the differences, not like 15 years ago,”. That’s a bold claim, as a lot of enthusiasts would strongly disagree.In reality, Moser is right, though.Mostly.During most normal driving, it’s almost impossible to tell the difference anymore because front-drive chassis and drivetrains have become so good. “For sure, 15 years ago it was the right way to go, but times have changed” he said.Moser does note that the switch was made for practical reasons, though. “Going to front-wheel drive has allowed us to make a big step forward in the compact segment, where we fight for every centimeter we can get.” So the business sense is to make a 1 Series that will attract more customers in the premium compact hatchback segment but not necessarily enthusiasts.Interior space and cargo volume seemed to be prioritized over outright handling balance.Though, don’t expect that same notion to make its way into other BMW models. “It’s about having the right package for each segment of the market,” said Moser.While we won’t say that we one hundred percent agree with Moser in that there’s no way to tell the difference between rear and front-wheel drive, we understand his point.To most customers, under most circumstances, he’s correct.But for the enthusiast that wants to push their car, the difference will be noticeable.Noticeable enough to not buy it?We’ll just have to wait and see. [Source: WhichCar ] The article BMW Exec: “No way to tell” between FWD and RWD 1 Series appeared first on BMW BLOG'

Honda’s Working On Sporty Rear-Wheel Drive EVs With A 50:50 Weight Distribution

Traffic Carscoops

The company's new BEV architecture will be launched by 2025 and underpin everything from crossovers to sedans.
'Honda used the Goodwood Festival of Speed to showcase their adorable e hatchback , but the company is working a new BEV architecture that will underpin an assortment of larger electric vehicles. Announced earlier this month, the architecture will be flexible and can accommodate different body styles as well as battery packs. It will also be available with an all-wheel drive system. The flexible nature of the platform promises to lower development costs as multiple vehicles will be based on the same architecture. These models will also share a number of components and this will also help to reduce costs. Honda was tight-lipped on specifics, but  Automotive News says the architecture will be launched by 2025 and underpin “everything from crossovers to sedans.” The publication went on to say models based on the platform will come standard with a rear-mounted electric motor and rear-wheel drive. The use of rear-wheel drive is certainly interesting and so is fact that vehicles based on the platform are slated to have a 50:50 weight distribution. The move is reportedly part of Honda’s plan to put an emphasis on sporty driving dynamics. There’s no word on performance specifications, but Honda’s Ayumu Matsuo revealed the architecture will be used on C- and D-segment vehicles. He also said models based on the platform will have “highly efficient packaging” and a “smooth” driving experience. Besides announcing plans for the BEV platform, Honda revealed its two-motor hybrid system will eventually be offered on “small-sized vehicles.” Honda will also be “applying our high-voltage system technologies to PHEVs, BEVs and FCVs” and the company said this will improve their performance. Also Read: Do These Patent Images Show A New Electric Honda Sports Car? While Honda has high hopes for these models, the company acknowledged challenges remain. In particular, the automaker said “required powertrains are different from region to region and are becoming further diversified depending on infrastructure, regulations and customer needs in each region.” That’s a significant problem, but the company intends to offer the “right products, in the right places at the right time.”'

Lil Nas X releases Area 51-themed video for 'Old Town Road' remix

Traffic Mashable

Tell everyone to giddy out your way so you can open up YouTube. Another video for 'Old Town Road' is out, this time for the remix featuring Billy Ray Cyrus, Young Thug, and Mason Ramsey. And — surprise — it's about storming Area 51. At this point,
'Tell everyone to giddy out your way so you can open up YouTube. Another video for \'Old Town Road\' is out, this time for the remix featuring Billy Ray Cyrus, Young Thug, and Mason Ramsey. And — surprise — it's about storming Area 51. At this point, Lil Nas X's meme literacy is virtually unparalleled in music, so it makes sense that the video (directed by Somehoodlum ) also features Thanos as a bird and Keanu Reeves Naruto running into the facility. ( This is the plan , ostensibly, for the Area 51 raid in September.) Lil Nas also pulls a panini out of his pocket, because of course he does . See y'all at the raid! Read more.. More about Memes , Area 51 , Mason Ramsey , Lil Nas X , and Old Town Road'

Social Media Goes Alight In Turkey After Dessert Makers Road Rage Against Allegedly Pregnant Woman

Traffic Carscoops

The two men attacked a car with a pregnant woman in the passenger seat.
'Road rage (unfortunately) affects drivers all around the world and footage has gone viral across social media in Turkey showing a pair of men intentionally damaging another car on a highway. Ahval News reports that the incident occurred on the D-100 highway in Istanbul and footage posted on Twitter appears to show the two men brake checking another car. Just seconds later, the two men exit the dark green Citroen and approach the other vehicle. One of the men repeatedly tries to open the door of the other car but it is locked. The man and woman inside the car can be heard shouting and apparently, the woman was repeatedly saying that she was pregnant. Also Watch: Man Gets Gun Pulled On Him During Scary Road Rage Incident Despite that, one of the men lets his anger get the better of him and attempts to rip off the driver’s side wing mirror by pulling on it and hitting it. As he makes his way back to the Citroen, he climbs over the hood of the other car and jumps on it, leaving a huge dent. Footage then offers a glimpse of the damage and confirms that the car was a white Skoda. A Turkish newspaper quickly identified the perpetrators as Hasan and Hüseyin Sel who reportedly own dessert brand Seydi Oğlu Baklava. Armed with the identity of the men, local authorities have reportedly called in Hasan Sel in for a statement. It remains to be seen if he or Hüseyin Sel will be charged for their horrible actions. Yer İstanbul, Pendik Şehir magandaları hamile bir kadının bulunduğu araca yol ortasında saldırıyor Şehir dağ başı değildir. Eşkiyalık hüküm süremez. Şehir hukukun, adabın olduğu yerdir. Bunları yeniden kazanacağız. Bu barbarlığa en ağır cezanın verilmesinin takipçisi olacağız. pic.twitter.com/Ka9O0Ym3t3 — Gürsel Tekin (@gurseltekin34) July 7, 2019'

Lotus Evija Debuts With 1,973 HP, Will Become World’s Most Powerful Road Car

Traffic Carscoops

Lotus' high-performance EV will rocket from 0-62 mph in less than three seconds and have a top speed in excess of 200 mph.
'Following a teaser earlier this month, Lotus has officially unveiled the new Evija. Set to become the world’s “most powerful series production road car,” the Evija has two electric motors which are targeted to produce a combined output of 1,973 hp (1471 kW / 2,000 PS) and 1,254 lb-ft (1,700 Nm) of torque.  Lotus says this should enable the hypercar to accelerate from 0-62 mph (0-100 km/h) in less than three seconds.  Given enough room, the model will eventually hit a top speed in excess of 200 mph (320 km/h). The electric motors are powered by a mid-mounted lithium-ion battery pack which should enable the car to travel up to 250 miles (400 km) on a single charge.  When it comes time to recharge, owners will be happy to know the model also boasts the “world’s fastest charging battery.”  It can accept an 800 kW charge, even though charging units with that capability aren’t commercially available yet.  However when they are, the Evija can be fully recharged in just nine minutes. Developing …'

Prisoner died after taking Spice-like substance

Traffic Business Breaking News

A prisoner died after taking a fatal amount of a painkiller and abusing a Spice-like substance. Mark Scott was found unresponsive by another prisoner at HMP Rochester, Fort Road, after his cell was unlocked. An inquest into the 49-year-old’s death
'A prisoner died after taking a fatal amount of a painkiller and abusing a Spice-like substance. Mark Scott was found unresponsive by another prisoner at HMP Rochester , Fort Road, after his cell was unlocked. An inquest into the 49-year-old’s death on March 17 2018 is currently being held at the Archbishop’s Palace, Maidstone . The jury heard how wheelchair-bound Mr Scott had been in the prison for just over a year. He was residing in the prison’s drug recovery wing, known as ‘A’ wing. Mr Scott suffered from chronic pain as a result of a road traffic accident in July 2016, in which he was the driver of a vehicle which crashed into a tree. The accident left him requiring a total hip replacement. He suffered multiple hip dislocations, and had a long-standing history of substance abuse. In the weeks leading up to his death, Mr Scott had been the subject of several case reviews after he reported being in a low mood and having suicidal thoughts due to his chronic pain and at the prospect of being released in June 2018. The court heard read evidence from Dr Guin Mijar, who carried out a review of Mr Scott’s clinical care and death, which detailed how Mr Scott had been in the care of the prison’s mental health team, and was also the subject of a document used by the prison to monitor prisons in ‘crisis’, after being found unresponsive in an incident in February 2018. At his last case review on March 13, staff reported that he was in a more positive mood and that he was having no thoughts of self harm. A substance misuse practitioner was also advising him with his housing situation ahead of his release. Giving evidence, Louisa Landridge, head of safer prisons at HMP Rochester, said how on the day of Mr Scott’s death, the prison had been in lockdown between 12pm and 4pm. She explained the staffing situation on the wing, and prisoner’s access to medical professionals. When it came time to unlock the cells at 4pm, another prisoner spotted Mr Scott laying on the floor through his door and alerted a prison guard who put out an emergency call onto the wing. An ambulance was called and attempts were made at resuscitation, which were unsuccessful. Pathologist Dr Dominic Chambers gave Mr Scott’s cause of death as multiple drug toxicity and ischemic heart disease. Toxicology reports showed that Mr Scott had two painkillers present in his blood, one of which was at a fatal level. The results also presented a level of a ‘new psychoactive substance’ which was likened to Spice by Dr Chambers and coroner Patricia Harding. Dr Chambers said: “I don’t know what that drug does” but went on to explain that the effect of such drugs can be similar to adrenaline, and that the combination of the drug and Mr Scott’s heart disease would have contributed to his death. The toxicology statement outline how little had been published about the drug, but it had been reported that 10 people in Japan had died after inhaling smoke from the substance. The jury is due to return a verdict on Friday, July 19. Read more: All the latest news from Medway For information on how we can report on court proceedings, click here . For more information on how we can report on inquests, click here .'

Aussie-Spec Ford Everest Gets New Safety Tech As Standard

Traffic Carscoops

Besides AEB, all Everest models get Lane Keeping Aid, Traffic Sign Recognition, and Automatic High Beam as standard.
'Ford has given its rugged Everest SUV a comprehensive safety update in Australia. From now on, all trim levels of the Ranger-based utility vehicle feature Autonomous Emergency Braking (AEB) with Pedestrian Detection. All Everest models built from May 2019 onwards feature the driver assistance system as standard, and Ford has also expanded the availability of other, similar technologies across the range. Previously reserved for the more expensive Trend and Titanium models, Lane Keeping Aid with Driver Alert System, Traffic Sign Recognition, and Automatic High Beam are now standard on the entry-level Ambiente grade as well. Also Read: Ford Exec Reveals An Everest Raptor Could Very Well Materialize In The Future These new systems add to the existing Rear View Camera, Rear Parking Sensors, Cruise Control with adjustable speed limiter, Emergency Assistance, and Dynamic Stability Control (DSC). The latter incorporates ABS, Load Adaptive Control, Roll Over Mitigation, Traction Control, and Trailer Sway Control while AWD models also get Hill Descent Control, Hill Launch Assist, and an E-locking Rear Differential. Ford continues to offer Australian customers the choice of two diesel powertrains: a standard 3.2-liter TDCi Duratorq five-cylinder rated at 192 hp (195 PS) and 470 Nm (347 lb-ft) of torque and an optional (standard on the Titanium) 2.0-liter TDCi Bi-Turbo four-cylinder unit that makes 210 hp (213 PS) and 500 Nm (369 lb-ft) of torque. The five-cylinder comes with a 6-speed automatic transmission while the four-cylinder ( shared with the Ranger Raptor ) is linked to a 10-speed auto. The updated Everest is already in Australian Ford dealerships with a starting price of AU$49,490 (approximately $34,800) for the base RWD, five-seat Ambiente grade.'

Hawaii protesters vow ‘prolonged struggle’ against telescope

Traffic Business Breaking News

MAUNA KEA, Hawaii — Protesters vowed to continue demonstrating against the construction of a giant telescope on top of a mountain some Native Hawaiians consider sacred after they spent the day blocking the road to the project site. About a dozen
'MAUNA KEA, Hawaii — Protesters vowed to continue demonstrating against the construction of a giant telescope on top of a mountain some Native Hawaiians consider sacred after they spent the day blocking the road to the project site. About a dozen elders, or kupuna, sat in chairs at the start of the road on Monday, committed to being arrested if need be. Another eight shackled themselves to each other over a grate in the road. They acted after state officials announced they would close the road to the summit of Mauna Kea so they could begin bringing equipment to the construction site in coming days. The confrontation was a dramatic start to what could be weeks or more of protests pitting scientific discovery against cultural preservation and indigenous rights. Authorities didn’t arrest anyone, saying their priority was installing concrete barriers along a nearby highway to create a buffer between speeding cars and the large numbers of people congregating in the area. No construction vehicles went up to the summit. Hundreds of protesters remained at the scene and many promised to continue their fight. “We understand that this going to be a prolonged struggle,” said Kaho’okahi Kanuha, one of the protest leaders. He said he was confident the telescope wouldn’t be built. Astronomers are hopeful the $1.4 billion Thirty Meter Telescope will help them study the earliest moments of the universe after the Big Bang as well as identify more planets outside our solar system. They favor Mauna Kea because the clear air and limited light pollution at its summit 13,796 feet (4,205 meters) above sea level makes it one of the world’s best locations for studying the skies. The peak is already home to about a dozen other telescopes. But some Native Hawaiians view the summit as sacred, and say the presence of yet another telescope will further damage it. Walter Ritte, a veteran Native Hawaiian activist, spent 11 hours lying on top of a grate in the road to prevent construction vehicles from going up the mountain. He said protesters’ arms were connected through a series of metal pipes under the grate. Authorities would have had to cut the pipes to remove them, he said. “It was so cold at 4 o’clock in the morning,” Ritte said. “It was a test of our fortitude. This mountain is like our last stand.” Telescope opponent Jennifer Leina’ala Sleightholm said she hoped peaceful protests would lead to an end of the project while acknowledging that was an unlikely scenario. “I think I know what will happen, but what I hope will happen is I hope that they would just turn around and save our kupuna,” she said, using the Hawaiian word for elders. Richard Ha, a Native Hawaiian farmer who supports the project, said he was encouraged that there seems to be some cooperation between protesters and law enforcement. He said he sympathized with the protesters, but was hopeful construction will begin. It can be hard for Native Hawaiians to support the telescope because they fear backlash for being perceived as opposing Hawaiian beliefs, he said. “It’s very difficult when you have family members on different sides,” he said. The project has been delayed by years of legal battles and demonstrations, drawing attention from the likes of “Aquaman” actor Jason Momoa, who has Native Hawaiian ancestry and has voiced opposition to the telescope. Scientists selected Mauna Kea in 2009 after a five-year, worldwide search for the ideal site. Protests disrupted a groundbreaking and Hawaiian blessing ceremony at the site in 2014. Attempts to begin construction in 2015 ended with arrests and crews pulling back. Hawaii’s Supreme Court last year ruled construction would be legal. The project has permits and the state has given the company behind the telescope a green light to resume building. The company is made up of a group of universities in California and Canada, with partners from China, India and Japan. The telescope’s primary mirror would measure 98 feet (30 meters) in diameter. It would be three times as wide as the world’s largest existing visible-light telescope, with nine times more area. Supporters say it will not only make important scientific discoveries but bring educational and economic opportunities to Hawaii. Gov. David Ige has said unarmed National Guard units would be used to transport personnel and supplies and enforce road closures but would not be used in law enforcement capacity during the protests.'

Telescope Foes Tie Together, Block Road to Hawaii Summit

Traffic Voice of America

Scientists hope the massive telescope they planned for the site — a world-renowned location for astronomy — will help them peer back to the time just after the Big Bang and answer fundamental questions about the universe
'Hundreds of demonstrators gathered Monday at the base of Hawaii's tallest mountain to protest the construction of a giant telescope on land that some Native Hawaiians consider sacred. At about daybreak, a group of kupuna, or elders, tied themselves together with rope at the road to the summit of Mauna Kea. Another group of protesters were on the ground, attached to a cattle grate.  Around them, protesters sang and chanted.  The road was later officially closed, hours after it was essentially blocked by protesters. The prone elders tied together were expecting to be arrested.  After two protest leaders spoke with police, they addressed the crowd and told them anyone who didn't move would be arrested. The group would move aside, but the elders were expected to remain, protest leaders Kaho'okahi Kanuha and Andre Perez said.  Demonstrators gather to block a road at the base of Hawaii's tallest mountain, July 15, 2019, in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, to protest the construction of a giant telescope on land that some Native Hawaiians consider sacred. Officials said anyone breaking the law will be prosecuted. Protesters who blocked the roadway during previous attempts to begin construction have been arrested. No arrests were immediately reported Monday morning. Telescope opponent Jennifer Leina'ala Sleightholm said she expects protests to remain peaceful. “I don't anticipate anybody will get out of hand,” she said. “We have never given them any reason to think that we would.”  She said she hopes the construction convoys turn around and leave.  “I think I know what will happen, but what I hope will happen is I hope that they would just turn around and save our kupuna,” she said, using the Hawaiian word for elders.  A puuhonua, or place of refuge, set up at the base of Mauna Kea won't be swept by authorities, Kanuha and Perez told protesters after consulting with police. Protesters planned to stay there overnight.  Scientists hope the massive telescope they planned for the site — a world-renowned location for astronomy — will help them peer back to the time just after the Big Bang and answer fundamental questions about the universe. But some Native Hawaiians consider the land holy, as a realm of gods and a place of worship. Groups of activists sang and prayed at the base of the mountain on Sunday afternoon. They declared the area, which is well off the highway at the intersection of the mountain's access road, a place of refuge and safety.  Activist Walter Ritte, left, and others lay chained to a cattle grate blocking a road at the base of Hawaii's tallest mountain, July 15, 2019, in Mauna Kea, Hawaii.  This is Hawaiian homelands,” said Kealoha Pisciotta, one of the protest leaders. “We're clearly out of their way, we're not obstructing anything, everyone is in ceremony.” The project already has been delayed by years of legal battles and demonstrations, drawing attention from the likes of “Aquaman” actor Jason Momoa, who has Native Hawaiian ancestry and has voiced opposition to the telescope.  Scientists selected Mauna Kea in 2009 after a five-year, worldwide search for the ideal site. Protests disrupted a groundbreaking and Hawaiian blessing ceremony at the site in 2014. After that, the demonstrations intensified. Construction stopped in April 2015 after protesters were arrested for blocking the work. A second attempt to restart construction a few months later ended with more arrests and crews pulling back. But Hawaii's Supreme Court has ruled the construction is legal, permits are in place, and the state has given the company behind the telescope a green light to resume its efforts. The company is made up of a group of universities in California and Canada, with partners from China, India and Japan. According to the University of Hawaii, ancient Hawaiians considered the location kapu, or forbidden. Only the highest-ranking chiefs and priests were allowed to make the long trek to Mauna Kea's summit above the clouds. Today, the university leases the land at the summit from the state for existing telescopes and observatories on the summit. A road built for telescope access decades ago is used by thousands of tourists and locals each year, including Native Hawaiians who go there to pray. Supporters of the $1.4 billion giant telescope say the cutting-edge instrument will not only make important scientific discoveries but bring educational and economic opportunities to Hawaii. The telescope's primary mirror would measure 98 feet (30 meters) in diameter. It would be three times as wide as the world's largest existing visible-light telescope, with nine times more area. Gov. David Ige said unarmed National Guard units will be used to transport personnel and supplies and enforce road closures, but they will not be used in a law enforcement capacity during planned protests. In a news conference Sunday, Ige said that he “respected the right of people to protest” at the telescope site as long as protesters behave lawfully. “As construction begins, our number one priority is keeping everyone safe,” Ige said, adding that he wants to make sure construction workers and truck drivers have unimpeded access to the telescope site.'