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Shannon Brinias no longer an anchor at KRDO

Business Business Breaking News

KRDO-TV anchor Shannon Brinias, the morning weekday host for the “Good Morning Colorado” news program, is no longer working as an on-screen anchor. Brinias still works at KRDO but in a different capacity. General manager Mark Pimentel confirmed
'KRDO-TV anchor Shannon Brinias, the morning weekday host for the “Good Morning Colorado” news program, is no longer working as an on-screen anchor. Brinias still works at KRDO but in a different capacity. General manager Mark Pimentel confirmed Brinias is still at the station, but she has taken a position as a producer. The move is expected to be permanent. This isn’t the first time viewers will bid adieu to Brinias. She worked at KKTV from 2006 to 2012 and was the evening co-anchor with Don Ward before moving to Sacramento to take the main anchor position at KOVR-TV, a CBS affiliate. Brinias returned to Colorado Springs in September 2017 to be KRDO’s new morning weekday anchor. She joined Abby Acone and Jon Karroll, who have both since left the station.  5 simple questions with KRDO sports director Rob Namnoum, who talks about ego and hair products TV Talk: KRDO gets new morning anchor as familiar face returning to Colorado Springs Terry Terrones Colorado Springs News Shannon Brinias leaving KKTV TERRY TERRONES'

The Latest: Arizona governor declares emergency for wildfire

Business Business Breaking News

Updated 4:03 pm PDT, Tuesday, July 23, 2019 Wildfire growing north of Flagstaff, Arizona Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey says a wildfire north of Flagstaff has grown to nearly two-thirds of a square mile. (July 22) Now Playing: Wildfire growing north of
'Updated 4:03 pm PDT, Tuesday, July 23, 2019 Wildfire growing north of Flagstaff, Arizona Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey says a wildfire north of Flagstaff has grown to nearly two-thirds of a square mile. (July 22) Now Playing: Wildfire growing north of Flagstaff, Arizona AD: Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey says a wildfire north of Flagstaff has grown to nearly two-thirds of a square mile. (July 22) Media: Associated Press FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — The Latest on a wildfire in northern Arizona (all times local): 3:30 p.m. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey has declared a state of emergency for a wildfire burning in northern Arizona. The fire that began Sunday now has charred an estimated 4 square miles (10 square kilometers) in a mountain pass that’s a prime spot for recreation within minutes of downtown Flagstaff and is 10 percent contained. Ducey’s declaration directs that $200,000 from the state’s general fund be made available to the director of the Arizona Division of Emergency Management. The funds can be used to reimburse eligible emergency response and recovery costs and ensures first responders have the resources they need. Pockets wildfires within the Museum fire create an ocean of light lapping at the slopes of the San Francisco Peaks as the fire burns Sunday, July 21, 2019, in Flagstaff, Ariz. (Jake Bacon/Arizona Daily Sun via AP) less Pockets wildfires within the Museum fire create an ocean of light lapping at the slopes of the San Francisco Peaks as the fire burns Sunday, July 21, 2019, in Flagstaff, Ariz. (Jake Bacon/Arizona Daily Sun via … more Photo: Jake Bacon, AP Photo: Jake Bacon, AP Image 1 of / 10 Caption Close Image 1 of 10 Pockets wildfires within the Museum fire create an ocean of light lapping at the slopes of the San Francisco Peaks as the fire burns Sunday, July 21, 2019, in Flagstaff, Ariz. (Jake Bacon/Arizona Daily Sun via AP) less Pockets wildfires within the Museum fire create an ocean of light lapping at the slopes of the San Francisco Peaks as the fire burns Sunday, July 21, 2019, in Flagstaff, Ariz. (Jake Bacon/Arizona Daily Sun via … more Photo: Jake Bacon, AP The Latest: Arizona governor declares emergency for wildfire 1  /  10 Back to Gallery After surveying the fire Tuesday afternoon and receiving a briefing from emergency officials, Ducey later met with displaced residents at a shelter in Flagstaff. _____ 8 a.m. Fire crews are using trails and roads to try to corral a wildfire burning near Flagstaff to keep it away from homes. Operations chief Todd Abel says the fire has burned more intensely because of sometimes gusty winds that quickly can change the fire’s direction. He says that will pose a challenge to firefighters Tuesday. Rain in the forecast this week could bring some relief. The fire has burned 2.8 square miles (7.2 square kilometers) in the Dry Lake Hills area near Mount Elden. About 600 people are working the fire, along with aircraft that can drop water and retardant to slow the fire’s spread. Incident commander Rich Nieto says the fire is the top priority for resources in the region.'

Hundreds of black deaths in 1919 are being remembered

Business Business Breaking News

Jesse J. Holland Associated Press Published 2:51 PM EDT Jul 23, 2019 America in the summer of 1919 ran red with blood from racial violence, and yet today, 100 years later, not many people know it even happened. It flowed in small towns like Elaine,
'Jesse J. Holland Associated Press Published 2:51 PM EDT Jul 23, 2019 America in the summer of 1919 ran red with blood from racial violence, and yet today, 100 years later, not many people know it even happened. It flowed in small towns like Elaine, Arkansas, in medium-size places such as Annapolis, Maryland, and Syracuse, New York, and in big cities like Washington and Chicago. Hundreds of African American men, women and children were burned alive, shot, hanged or beaten to death by white mobs. Thousands saw their homes and businesses burned to the ground and were driven out, many never to return. It was branded “Red Summer” because of the bloodshed and amounted to some of the worst white-on-black violence in U.S. history. Beyond the lives and family fortunes lost, it had far-reaching repercussions, contributing to generations of black distrust of white authority. But it also galvanized blacks to defend themselves and their neighborhoods with fists and guns; reinvigorated civil rights organizations like the NAACP and led to a new era of activism; gave rise to courageous reporting by black journalists; and influenced the generation of leaders who would take up the fight for racial equality decades later. “The people who were the icons of the civil rights movement were raised by the people who survived Red Summer,” said Saje Mathieu, a history professor at the University of Minnesota. For all that, there are no national observances marking Red Summer. History textbooks ignore it, and most museums don’t acknowledge it. The reason: Red Summer contradicts the post-World War I-era notion that America was making the world safe for democracy, historians say. “It doesn’t fit into the neat stories we tell ourselves,” said David Krugler, author of “1919, The Year of Racial Violence: How African Americans Fought Back.” That could change. A monument has been proposed in Arkansas. Several authors have written about the bloody summer. A Brooklyn choral group performed Red Summer-theme songs like “And They Lynched Him on a Tree” in March to commemorate the centennial. At the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mathieu and author Cameron McWhirter plan to present some of their findings July 30 . Researchers believe that in a span of 10 months, more than 250 African Americans were killed in at least 25 riots across the U.S. by white mobs that never faced punishment. Historian John Hope Franklin called it “the greatest period of interracial strife the nation has ever witnessed.” The bloodshed was the product of a collision of social forces: Black men were returning from World War I expecting the same rights they had fought and bled for in Europe, and African Americans were moving north to escape the brutal Jim Crow laws of the South. Whites saw blacks as competition for jobs, homes and political power. “Ethnic cleansing was the goal of the white rioters,” said William Tuttle, a retired professor of American studies at the University of Kansas and author of “Race Riot: Chicago in the Red Summer of 1919.” “They wanted to kill as many black people as possible and to terrorize the rest until they were willing to leave and live someplace else.” The violence didn’t start or end in 1919. Some count the era of Red Summer as beginning with the deaths of more than two dozen African Americans in East St. Louis, Illinois, in 1917 and extending through the Rosewood Massacre of 1923, when a black town in Florida was destroyed. All told, at least 1,122 Americans were killed in racial violence over those six years, by Tuttle’s count. In 1919 alone, violence erupted in such places as New York; Memphis, Tennessee; Philadelphia; Charleston, South Carolina; Baltimore; New Orleans; Wilmington, Delaware; Omaha, Nebraska; New London, Connecticut; Bisbee, Arizona; Longview, Texas; Knoxville, Tennessee; Norfolk, Virginia; and Putnam County, Georgia. In the nation’s capital, white mobs – many made up of members of the military – rampaged over the weekend of July 19-22, beating any black they could find after false rumors of a white woman being assaulted by black men spread. “In front of the Riggs Bank the rioters beat a Negro with clubs and stones wrapped in handkerchiefs; the bleeding figure lay in the street for over twenty minutes before being taken to the hospital,” Lloyd M. Abernethy wrote in the Maryland Historical Magazine in 1963. “Sensing the failure of the police, the mob became even more contemptuous of authority – two Negroes were attacked and beaten directly in front of the White House.” Carter G. Woodson, the historian who founded Black History Month in 1926, saw the violence up close. “They had caught a Negro and deliberately held him as one would a beef for slaughter, and when they had conveniently adjusted him for lynching, they shot him,” Woodson wrote. “I heard him groaning in his struggle as I hurried away as fast as I could without running, expecting every moment to be lynched myself.” In Elaine, Arkansas, poor black sharecroppers who had dared to join a union were attacked, and at least 200 African Americans were killed. Ida B. Wells, a pioneering black journalist and one of the few reporters to interview victims, noted a woman named Lula Black was dragged from her farm by a white mob after saying she would join the union. “They knocked her down, beat her over the head with their pistols, kicked her all over the body, almost killed her, then took her to jail,” Wells wrote in her report “The Arkansas Race Riot.” “The same mob went to Frank Hall’s house and killed Frances Hall, a crazy old woman housekeeper, tied her clothes over her head, threw her body in the public road where it lay thus exposed till the soldiers came Thursday evening and took it up.” Black journalists like Wells played an important role in getting the story out. “Black newspapers like the Chicago Defender were instrumental in providing an alternate voice that represented why African Americans deserved to be here, deserved equal rights and were, in some cases, justified in fighting,” said Kevin Strait, a curator at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Red Summer also marked a new era of black resistance to white injustice, with African Americans standing up in unprecedented numbers and killing some of their tormentors. Returning black soldiers from World War I led the charge, using skills they refined in Europe. “The Germans weren’t the enemy – the enemy was right here at home,” said Harry Haywood in his autobiography, “A Black Communist in the Freedom Struggle: The Life of Harry Haywood.” In Washington, Carrie Johnson, 17, became a hero for shooting at white invaders in her neighborhood. She fatally shot a white policeman who broke into her second-story bedroom. She claimed self-defense, and her manslaughter conviction was overturned. The NAACP gained about 100,000 members that year, said McWhirter, author of “Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America.” Soon, blacks were “going to Congress, they’re pressing congressmen and senators to pass anti-lynching legislation. At the same time, they’re fighting back in the courts, they’re filing lawsuits when people are being mistreated or railroaded.” The lessons of Red Summer would reverberate after World War II. “You have a similar situation where African Americans had done their part to make the world safe for democracy, and black veterans came home, and many of them were alive or had heard the stories of what happened in 1919,” Krugler said. “And they said, ‘Never again.’”'

Sluggish Global Growth Calls for Supportive Policies

Business African Eye Report

July 23, 2019//-In our July update of the World Economic Outlook we are revising downward our projection for global growth to 3.2 percent in 2019 and 3.5 percent in 2020.  While this is a modest revision of 0.1 percentage points for both years
'(PHOTO: ANDREA SOSA CABRIOS/DPA PICTURE ALLIANCE/NEWSCOM) July 23, 2019//-In our July update of the  World Economic Outlook  we are revising downward our projection for global growth to 3.2 percent in 2019 and 3.5 percent in 2020.  While this is a modest revision of 0.1 percentage points for both years relative to our projections in April, it comes on top of previous significant downward revisions. The revision for 2019 reflects negative surprises for growth in emerging market and developing economies that offset positive surprises in some advanced economies. Growth is projected to improve between 2019 and 2020. However, close to 70 percent of the increase relies on an improvement in the growth performance in stressed emerging market and developing economies and is therefore subject to high uncertainty. Global growth is sluggish and precarious, but it does not have to be this way because some of this is self-inflicted. Dynamism in the global economy is being weighed down by prolonged policy uncertainty as  trade tensions  remain heightened despite the recent US-China trade truce, technology tensions have erupted threatening global technology supply chains, and the prospects of a no-deal Brexit have increased. Global growth is sluggish and precarious, but it does not have to be this way because some of this is self-inflicted. The negative consequences of policy uncertainty are visible in the diverging trends between the manufacturing and services sector, and the significant weakness in global trade. Manufacturing purchasing manager indices continue to decline alongside worsening business sentiment as businesses hold off on investment in the face of high uncertainty. Global trade growth, which moves closely with investment, has slowed significantly to 0.5 percent (year-on-year) in the first quarter of 2019, which is its slowest pace since 2012. On the other hand, the services sector is holding up and consumer sentiment is strong, as unemployment rates touch record lows and wage incomes rise in several countries. Among advanced economies—the United States, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the euro area—grew faster than expected in the first quarter of 2019. However, some of the factors behind this—such as stronger inventory build-ups—are transitory and the growth momentum going forward is expected to be weaker, especially for countries reliant on external demand. Owing to first quarter upward revisions, especially for the United States, we are raising our projection for advanced economies slightly, by 0.1 percentage points, to 1.9 percent for 2019. Going forward, growth is projected to slow to 1.7 percent, as the effects of fiscal stimulus taper off in the United States and weak productivity growth and aging demographics dampen long-run prospects for advanced economies. In emerging market and developing economies, growth is being revised down by 0.3 percentage points in 2019 to 4.1 percent and by 0.1 percentage points for 2020 to 4.7 percent. The downward revisions for 2019 are almost across the board for the major economies, though for varied reasons. In China, the slight revision downwards reflects, in part, the higher tariffs imposed by the United States in May, while the more significant revisions in India and Brazil reflect weaker-than-expected domestic demand. For commodity exporters, supply disruptions, such as in Russia and Chile, and sanctions on Iran, have led to downward revisions despite a near-term strengthening in oil prices. The projected recovery in growth between 2019 and 2020 in emerging market and developing economies relies on improved growth outcomes in stressed economies such as Argentina, Turkey, Iran, and Venezuela, and therefore is subject to significant uncertainty. Financial conditions in the United States and the euro area have further eased, as the US Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank adopted a more accommodative monetary policy stance. Emerging market and developing economies have benefited from monetary easing in major economies but have also faced volatile risk sentiment tied to trade tensions. On net, financial conditions are about the same for this group as in April. Low-income developing countries that previously received mainly stable foreign direct investment flows now receive significant volatile portfolio flows, as the search for yield in a low interest rate environment reaches frontier markets. Increased downside risks A major downside risk to the outlook remains an escalation of trade and technology tensions that can significantly disrupt global supply chains. The combined effect of tariffs imposed last year and potential tariffs envisaged in May between the United States and China could reduce the level of global GDP in 2020 by 0.5 percent. Further, a surprise and durable worsening of financial sentiment can expose  financial vulnerabilities  built up over years of low interest rates, while disinflationary pressures can lead to difficulties in debt servicing for borrowers. Other significant risks include a surprise slowdown in China, the lack of a recovery in the euro area, a no-deal Brexit, and escalation of geopolitical tensions. With global growth subdued and downside risks dominating the outlook, the global economy remains at a delicate juncture. It is therefore essential that tariffs are not used to target bilateral trade balances or as a general-purpose tool to tackle international disagreements. To help resolve conflicts, the rules-based multilateral trading system should be strengthened and modernized to encompass areas such as digital services, subsidies, and technology transfer. Policies to support growth Monetary policy should remain accommodative especially where inflation is softening below target. But it needs to be accompanied by sound trade policies that would lift the outlook and reduce downside risks. With persistently low interest rates, macroprudential tools should be deployed to ensure that financial risks do not build up. Fiscal policy should balance growth, equity, and sustainability concerns, including protecting society’s most vulnerable. Countries with fiscal space should invest in physical and social infrastructure to raise potential growth. In the event of a severe downturn, a synchronized move toward more accommodative fiscal policies should complement monetary easing, subject to country specific circumstances. Lastly, the need for greater global cooperation is ever urgent. In addition to resolving trade and technology tensions, countries need to work together to address major issues such as climate change, international taxation, corruption, cybersecurity, and the opportunities and challenges of newly emerging digital payment technologies.   By  Gita Gopinath IMF Blog'

The president’s silent spokeswoman

Business Business Breaking News

Stephanie Grisham is operating under a basic principle as President Donald Trump’s new chief spokesperson and communications director: Let Trump soak up all the media oxygen. She has not appeared on Fox News, the president’s favorite channel, or
'Stephanie Grisham is operating under a basic principle as President Donald Trump’s new chief spokesperson and communications director: Let Trump soak up all the media oxygen. She has not appeared on Fox News, the president’s favorite channel, or taken reporters’ questions in a gaggle from the White House driveway. Story Continued Below Apart from a single missive sent out last week under the official press secretary Twitter handle, she stayed out of the week-long explosions over the president’s fiery directive that four Democratic lawmakers and women of color should “go back” to their countries if they do not like the way the U.S. government runs. “So typical to watch the mainstream media and Dems attack @realDonaldTrump for speaking directly to the American people,” Grisham wrote in her July 15 Tweet . “His message is simple: the U.S.A. is the greatest nation on Earth, but if people aren’t happy here they don’t have to stay.” Trump’s comments triggered harsh criticism from across the political spectrum in Washington, forcing the president to lurch between disavowing his comments and defending them. But Grisham was nowhere to be seen publicly. Unlike her predecessors Sean Spicer, Hope Hicks or Sarah Huckabee Sanders, Grisham is not on her way to becoming a household name or the subject of a “Saturday Night Live“ skit. Hicks could barely leave her Washington apartment without being photographed toward the end of her tenure. Most Americans do not know what Grisham’s voice sounds like — a rarity for a White House front man. For now, she’s fine letting others do the talking, according to interviews with 10 current and former senior administration officials. She still intends to put her own imprint on the West Wing. On paper, she’s brainstorming a potential new structure for the roughly 40-person press and communications shop that would leave much of the day-to-day management of staff and decision-making to deputies. She’s also considering bringing in additional staff. She does not plan to constantly appear on TV like senior adviser Kellyanne Conway or principal deputy press secretary Hogan Gidley, both of whom the president likes on-air. Instead she’ll pick her spots when she speaks out publicly or goes on the attack, just as she did under the First Lady. Grisham sees the key constituencies for her job now as serving both the president and the press, according to friends and current and former administration officials — to allow Trump to serve as his own best messenger and dictate the strategy while giving reporters as much direct access to him as possible. She’s been, so far, like a silent middleman. And as for those seemingly dead daily briefings? Several senior administration officials stressed the president — and he alone — decides if and when those will reappear, even occasionally. “The president is very happy with the way things are. I have no sense anything major will change,” said one former administration official. “If it does change, it will be the Cabinet officials who go out more.” The president of the White House Correspondents’ Association, Jonathan Karl, said that based on his initial conversations with Grisham, he believes she wants to bring back the briefings in some form once she settles into her new role. The most concrete action she has taken so far inside the building is putting her nameplate on her new office door, meeting with staff individually and hiring a young new assistant from another White House office. She is also receiving briefings from White House experts to get up to speed on the vast policy portfolio, from economics to national security to foreign policy. Grisham declined to be interviewed for this story. No one can say Grisham started off her tenure slowly. Her first weekend on the job in late June involved attending G20 meetings with Trump followed by a historic visit to the DMZ, accompanying the first president to ever visit North Korea. She earned kudos from the U.S. traveling press on that trip when she shoved aside North Korean security guards who were attempting to block U.S. journalists’ access to Trump’s meeting with the North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. In a video of the encounter, Grisham is seen pushing a guard to the side and then saying, wide-eyed to American journalists, “Go, go.” Karl called it “a good start when she — literally — fought to get the White House press pool access.” White House and senior administration officials have expressed relief that Trump chose her for the job and not an official from an agency or pundit from Fox News. “People are really happy that it is someone within the building who already has familiarity with the operation. There is a drama-free nature to the transition, and so far, no one is killing anyone or fighting,” said one White House official. Staffers, who usually call Grisham by her last name, feel like she is a known commodity who can build on her existing relationship with the president and First Lady — while keeping her teams firmly within the power structure of the White House and not marginalized. Part of her first few weeks have involved spending more time with Trump, several senior administration officials say. The two talk throughout the day by phone, starting early in the morning and then meet in-person in the Oval Office throughout the work day. Grisham is also continuing to oversee the press operations of the First Lady, keeping up her close relationship with Ms. Trump. Both Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump are fans of hers, say senior administration officials. Her relationship with the Trump family dates back to the 2016 campaign, when she served as a traveling press director and helped to shepherd the national media on the Trump plane from event to event. That experience helped her get to know and earn the respect of national political reporters, but it also put her in the rarefied category of a “Trump campaign original” alongside officials such as Hope Hicks, Dan Scavino, Stephen Miller or Trump’s former body man Johnny McEntee. “President Trump just trusts her completely in terms of that loyalty test he has with everyone,” said Cliff Sims, author of the White House memoir “Team of Vipers” and the former director of White House message strategy. “When she first moved over to the First Lady’s office, he used to talk about how much he missed her wrangling the press. When they’d keep yelling questions in the Oval after it was time to leave, he would say, ‘This never happened when Stephanie was here.’” Following the campaign, Grisham briefly joined the White House press shop as a deputy under Sean Spicer before Ms. Trump poached her for the East Wing. This gave her early exposure to the White House’s sprawling press and communications operations including its processes and infighting. Over in the East Wing, Grisham earned a reputation as a tough defender of the First Lady in a shop where there were almost no leaks. She made occasional TV appearances on behalf of Ms. Trump for events surrounding the “Be Best” campaign, the annual Easter Egg Roll and Halloween festivities. But mostly, she played a more behind-the-scenes role as a fierce defender of Ms. Trump, who occasionally put out strongly worded statements including one about a former top White House national security adviser who was later fired. Ms. Trump was the one to announce Grisham’s move to the West Wing, writing on Twitter : “She has been with us since 2015 – @potus & I can think of no better person to serve the Administration & our country. Excited to have Stephanie working for both sides of the @WhiteHouse .” Grisham’s position was even further cemented last week when the entire press and communications operation took a team photo in the Oval Office with the president to mark the transition and to say thanks to the younger staff members. The president specifically commended Grisham during the photo op, according to two officials, and it felt like the hallmark of a new era. Grisham is the only person in the Trump White House to hold the title of both press secretary and communications director for both the West Wing and East Wing of the White House. “The president is his own spokesperson, so we’re moving into a new era in terms of the press secretary’s core responsibilities. I think Stephanie will play a role similar to what Sarah Huckabee Sanders morphed into — a trusted adviser to the president on press and communications issues, who manages the team,” said Sims. As a longtime visitor to the Trump orbit, Grisham also knows better than most what it takes to survive and thrive. The people who last the longest “are the ones who are not constantly sucked into whatever the public relations, on-camera crisis of the moment and instead work to maintain a lower profile,” Sims added. “That is what Stephanie did with the First Lady. She picked her spots.”'

noon announces partnership to bring Neolix autonomous driving vehicles to Dubai

Business Biz Today

DUBAI: noon, the Middle East’s homegrown digital marketplace created in the region and powered by the region’s leading retailers, has announced it has partnered with Chinese technology company Neolix to trial driverless delivery vehicles designed to
'DUBAI: noon, the Middle East’s homegrown digital marketplace created in the region and powered by the region’s leading retailers, has announced it has partnered with Chinese technology company Neolix to trial driverless delivery vehicles designed to make last-mile delivery even smoother.Pushingthe boundaries of technology in the region is core to noon.com’s values.Thispartnership with Neolix, a Beijing-based technology company specializing in theR&D and the production of autonomous vehicles, is the next step in deliveryinnovation.MohamedAlabbar, noon.com’s founder signed a memorandum of understand (MoU) with NeolixHuitong (Beijing) Technology co., LTD, to introduce autonomous deliveryvehicles into the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia.This will be the firsttime such technology has been used in the region and will open a new spectrumof opportunity to introduce powerful Chinese technology to the world.MohamedAlabbar, founder of noon.com, said of the partnership, “Introducing newtechnology to the region that will improve the e-commerce experience forcustomers is something we’re incredibly excited about. noon is very proud tobring driverless delivery vans to streets in our cities.We look forward tobringing many such innovations over the next few months.We are a hungry,talented and ambitious nation.I hope it will inspire our tech-driven youth todream big and to achieve those dreams because everything is possiblehere.”  Autonomoustechnology has been transforming the way that companies deliver goods andservices to consumers overseas.Now, with the help of noon.com and Neoflix, thesame technology will be available here in the region.Over the next few weeks,noon.com will trial autonomous vehicles to complete its last-mile delivery in keyareas of Abu Dhabi and Dubai.The driverless vehicles will be built by Neoflixwho have deep knowledge and experience with the productization of autonomoustechnology.The driverless vans are being especially customized to suit theregion’s weather conditions, and are being seamlessly integrated with noon’slogistics platform.Havingalready created a hyper-efficient homegrown logistics and supply chain setup inthe KSA, the UAE and Egypt, noon.com is now looking to make the last mile ofdeliveries even smoother to give customers in the region a higher qualityexperience.As well as being reliable and speedy, driverless vehicle technologycan remove up to 90% of the cost associated with the last mile of delivery.This partnership between Neolix and noon furthers noon’s commitment to bringthe best technology and solutions to serve our region’s ecommerce customers.TheNeolix project incubation started in 2015 and since then has developed andindustrialized the production of autonomous vehicles targeting commercialapplications, delivering 150 L4 autonomous driving vehicles.Currently, Neolixhas 4 types of products: Retail, Express, Freight, and Patrol.Neolix’s missionis to reconstruct the infrastructure for future city logistics, a mission thatis in line with noon.com’s tech-driven vision.With more than 10 years’experiences in smart logistics, the Neolix team embraces the pioneering spiritto turn prototypes into usable products.Neolix vehicles are already inoperation in various tourist attractions, campuses, and logistics parks acrossChina.Primarily a digital e-commerce platform utilizing homegrown technology capabilities, noon has rapidly built deep native capabilities in its marketplace, fulfillment, logistics and payments platforms. noon promises to bring customers in the region more choice, affordability and convenience across a wide range of products including electronics, fashion, beauty, baby, home and kitchen, as well as free, fast delivery and free returns.News Desk . The post noon announces partnership to bring Neolix autonomous driving vehicles to Dubai appeared first on Biz Today .'

Gulf Air welcomes new Bahraini pilots

Business Biz Today

MANAMA: Gulf Air, the national carrier of the Kingdom of Bahrain, continues moving forward in keeping Bahrainization at the core of its recruitment strategy by welcoming a new batch of Bahraini pilots who have recently began operating flights after
'MANAMA: Gulf Air, the national carrier of the Kingdom of Bahrain, continues moving forward in keeping Bahrainization at the core of its recruitment strategy by welcoming a new batch of Bahraini pilots who have recently began operating flights after completing all the necessary vigorous ground and base training courses.The new batch of pilots join the national carrier from a number of neighbouring regional airlines to be part of their national carrier and serving the Kingdom of Bahrain.GulfAir’s Deputy Chief Executive Officer Captain Waleed Al Alawi congratulated theairline’s new pilots for passing the selection process, and noted: “With morethan 70% of our pilots being Bahrainis, this is a major milestone for us to bea leader amongst carriers from our neighbouring countries by having local,specialized and professional talents representing our glorious Kingdom in theskies.Gulf Air continues to takes pride in being a corporate leader inBahrainization in the Kingdom of Bahrain.” TheAirline news pilots are Captain Aref Al Mulla, first officers: Ali Hussain,Khalifa Daleem, Khaled Al-Setrawi and Husain Ismail, second officers: KhaledBubshait and Ali Al Noaimi. “I am very happy to join Gulf Air and be one of itsambassadors in the skies.I have worked in regional airlines in neighbouringcountries, but nothing compares returning home and working with my country’snational carrier.Being close to my family and friends is amazing,” commentedCaptain Aref Al Mulla.Also commenting first officer Khalid Al Satrawi said,“It feels great to be amongst this group of Bahraini pilots joining Gulf Airtogether on the same time.We thank the airline and its management for givingus this opportunity to return home and be the future captains of Gulf Air”. GulfAir prides itself with its legacy and long experience in aviation; as theairline selects only the top pilot contenders based on their performance; andin compliance with the high standards that Gulf Air has set for its pilots andwith the Bahrain Civil Aviation Affairs safety regulations.Safety and securityissues are important elements for the national carrier in selecting its pilots,as they undergo a very challenging screening process includes a technicalassessment, followed by a comprehensive technical interview.Gulf Air is committed to invest in its Bahraini workforce and their career development and as such, it continues to provide opportunities for Bahraini nationals to take over senior positions in the company with 90% of employees that are based at the headquarters in Muharraq being Bahraini along with nearly 70% of its pilots.The airline has established a tailored programme in which it recruits and trains Bahrainis to become aviation professionals and continue Bahrain’s legacy of being a longstanding reliable source of aviation industry professionals who have served the national carrier and other regional airlines.BIZ TODAY MONITOR . The post Gulf Air welcomes new Bahraini pilots appeared first on Biz Today .'