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Trump is Tripling Down On His Racist Tweets Against 'The Squad.' Republicans Are Silent.

Athletics VICE News

'You cannot accept that we don't fear you,' Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez replied to Trump's racist tirade.
'President Trump unleashed a racist Twitter rant aimed at a group of minority Democratic congresswomen, telling four American citizens to “go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came.” On Sunday night, he went back for more, calling them “disgraceful.” On Monday morning, facing widespread outrage, he tripled down. Trump posted two new tweets on Monday morning aimed at Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, known in Washington, D.C. as “The Squad.” First, he asked : “When will the Radical Left Congresswomen apologize to our Country, the people of Israel and even to the Office of the President, for the foul language they have used, and the terrible things they have said. So many people are angry at them & their horrible & disgusting actions!” Later, Trump indicated he had an idea about who the real racists were and it definitely was not the guy who told women of color “you can’t leave [the U.S.] fast enough.” READ MORE: Ilhan Omar says Trump is encouraging death threats against her “If Democrats want to unite around the foul language & racist hatred spewed from the mouths and actions of these very unpopular & unrepresentative Congresswomen, it will be interesting to see how it plays out,” he tweeted on Monday. “I can tell you that they have made Israel feel abandoned by the U.S.” Clearly, Trump has no remorse for the racist tweets he posted this week. And while the condemnation has been widespread elsewhere, the response from Republican lawmakers has been crickets . In Trump’s lengthy, racist rant on Sunday morning, he described the congresswomen as “viciously telling the people of the United States, the greatest and most powerful Nation on earth, how our government is to be run.” The response was swift and angry from pretty much anyone who wasn’t a prominent Republican. Omar wrote that Trump is “stoking white nationalism [because he is] angry that people like us are serving in Congress.” Pressley wrote: “THIS is what racism looks like. WE are what democracy looks like. And we’re not going anywhere.” Even House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who has been feuding with The Squad over a border funding bill, came to their defense. “When @realDonaldTrump tells four American Congresswomen to go back to their countries, he reaffirms his plan to ‘Make America Great Again’ has always been about making America white again,” she wrote on Twitter. Democratic 2020 candidates — including Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren , Pete Buttigieg , Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden — all jumped in to condemn Trump’s posts as racist. A New York Times op-ed declared the tweets proved Trump was a “raging racist.” CNN media reporter Brian Stelter called it “straight-up racist.” READ MORE: AOC and other progressive freshmen will get to grill Trump officials from their new committee seats You get the picture: Most everyone agreed the comments were racist and bad. That is, everyone but GOP lawmakers. Senators like Mitt Romney, who has criticized the president for his comments about late Republican Senator John McCain, was silent. Texas Congressman Chip Roy skated about as close to criticism as any GOP figure: he tweeted Trump “was wrong to say any American citizen, whether in Congress or not, has any ‘home’ besides the U.S.” But the second half of his tweet reiterated his support for the president’s overall message. “But I just as strongly believe non-citizens who abuse our immigration laws should be sent home immediately, & Reps who refuse to defend America should be sent home 11/2020,” Roy tweeted . As of Monday morning, no Trump ally or GOP lawmaker had lodged any serious complaint against the president. The closest we got was Fox personality Geraldo Rivera saying that his “friend” Trump was “better than” the “language that’s xenophobic [or] even racist.” Meanwhile, figures closer to Trump seem to be backing him. Marc Short, chief of staff to Vice President Mike Pence, claimed to the AP that the comments from the president were aimed at “very specific” comments from Omar. “I don’t think that the president’s intent any way is racist,” he said. Cover: President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Friday, July 12, 2019, before Trump boards Marine One for a short trip to Andrews Air Force Base, Md. and then on to Wisconsin. Trump says Labor Secretary Alex Acosta to step down, move comes in wake of handling of Jeffrey Epstein case. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)'

Ed Hardy’s first retrospective paints him as fine artist

Athletics Business Breaking News

SAN FRANCISCO — When people hear the name Ed Hardy, they likely think of the flashy, tiger- and skull-emblazoned clothing that rocketed to popularity in the 2000s, appearing on the likes of Paris Hilton, Britney Spears and cast members from the
'SAN FRANCISCO — When people hear the name Ed Hardy, they likely think of the flashy, tiger- and skull-emblazoned clothing that rocketed to popularity in the 2000s, appearing on the likes of Paris Hilton, Britney Spears and cast members from the reality TV show “Jersey Shore.” Others recognize Hardy as a trailblazing tattooer whose unique designs were licensed for use on apparel and merchandise, and whose legacy transcends the brand’s current notoriety. But few know him as a prolific fine artist. “The clothing was one little blip on his whole career, which was staggering,” said Mary Joy Scott, a tattoo artist who apprenticed under Hardy and works at the San Francisco shop he founded, Tattoo City. Five miles (8 kilometers) southwest of Tattoo City, a lively exhibition opening Friday at the de Young Museum sheds light on Hardy as wide-ranging artist and tattoo pioneer. Through 300 paintings, prints, drawings and objects, “Ed Hardy: Deeper than Skin” is the first retrospective of his work and shows how Hardy intertwined fine art with tattooing to push both forward. “Ed Hardy’s mission (was) to elevate the tattoo form from its subculture status back in the 1960s at least to a level of a folk art. I think he surpassed that,” said curator Karin Breuer. “Here it is in museum culture.” The exhibition, which follows Hardy’s donation of 152 prints to the museum, bursts with color as it tracks the 74-year-old artist’s evolution. It features crayon drawings of sample tattoos Hardy made as a 10-year-old, when he set up a tattoo shop for friends in his Southern California neighborhood of Corona del Mar. Prints from his college days at the San Francisco Art Institute are displayed alongside lithographs and etchings by the likes of Rodolphe Bresdin and Gordon Cooke, who inspired Hardy. “I’m part of a continuum,” Hardy said of his art idols. “There’s a lot more to my life than tattooing.” One of the first pieces in “Deeper than Skin” is a 1967 print entitled “Future Plans,” in which a then-undergraduate Hardy, with only a few tattoos, portrays himself as fully inked. The exhibition comes full circle with its final image, a blown-up 2009 photo of a bare-chested, tattoo-covered Hardy, now a full-fledged artist retired from tattooing thanks to the financial windfall of the clothing brand. Visitors can get a projected animation of a Hardy tattoo design “applied” to their skin. They can also walk along a snaking, 2,000-square-foot (186-square-meter) scroll suspended from the ceiling on which Hardy painted 2,000 dragons in the year 2000. “Ed Hardy is the only tattooer in the Western world who could merit a show of this kind,” said Matt Lodder, a University of Essex professor who studies the history of tattoo as art. “Tattooers of a particular mode are all working, whether they know it or not, in a kind of pattern Ed Hardy was the first to lay down.” When Hardy began tattooing in 1967 after abandoning plans to attend Yale art school, he was one of the few American tattoo artists with a fine arts background. Hardy was also the first Western tattoo artist to study traditional Japanese tattooing abroad. When he returned stateside, Hardy blended those techniques with the American sailor and military tattoo types to develop his signature style: colorful hearts, clouds, dragons, daggers, roses and ribbons with bold, black outlines. In 1974, Hardy moved away from offering pre-designed “flash” tattoos towards made-to-order work, an approach that’s now the norm. Before Hardy, no other tattoo shop operated that way. The exhibition displays Hardy’s custom pencil sketches and watercolors beneath photographs of the works inked on human bodies. “It’s rather shocking to some people that we can jump from an exhibition of Monet paintings to an exhibition of a tattoo artist,” Breuer said. The de Young offers discounts for tattooed visitors in an attempt to attract a wider demographic. The retrospective, which runs through Oct. 6, marks changing sensibilities in the art world as museums embrace tattoo as fine art. An overlapping exhibition at San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum showcases tattoos in Japanese prints. “It’s a terrific affirmation, not only for myself, but for a lot of the old bandits and pirates that helped me in the business,” Hardy said. “They operated outside polite society, outside of the structure that controls what people think of as art.”'

Bill Russell, Alex Morgan and other Bay Area athletes win ESPYs

Athletics Business Breaking News

By Drew Costley, SFGATE Updated 7:29 pm PDT, Wednesday, July 10, 2019 LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JULY 10: Alex Morgan poses with the ESPY Award for Best Female Athlete during The 2019 ESPYs at Microsoft Theater on July 10, 2019 in Los Angeles,
'By Drew Costley , SFGATE Updated 7:29 pm PDT, Wednesday, July 10, 2019 LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JULY 10: Alex Morgan poses with the ESPY Award for Best Female Athlete during The 2019 ESPYs at Microsoft Theater on July 10, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Rich Fury/Getty Images) less LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JULY 10: Alex Morgan poses with the ESPY Award for Best Female Athlete during The 2019 ESPYs at Microsoft Theater on July 10, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Rich Fury/Getty … more Photo: Rich Fury/Getty Images Photo: Rich Fury/Getty Images Image 1 of / 12 Caption Close Image 1 of 12 LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JULY 10: Alex Morgan poses with the ESPY Award for Best Female Athlete during The 2019 ESPYs at Microsoft Theater on July 10, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Rich Fury/Getty Images) less LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JULY 10: Alex Morgan poses with the ESPY Award for Best Female Athlete during The 2019 ESPYs at Microsoft Theater on July 10, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Rich Fury/Getty … more Photo: Rich Fury/Getty Images Bill Russell, Alex Morgan and other Bay Area athletes win ESPYs 1  /  12 Back to Gallery U.S. Women’s National Team (USWNT) player Alex Morgan, and Oakland native and NBA legend Bill Russell were among four people with ties to the San Francisco Bay Area honored with ESPY Awards at a ceremony hosted by ESPN in Los Angeles on Wednesday. Morgan, who played collegiate soccer at UC Berkeley, was one of the key players on the USWNT that recently won the 2019 Women’s World Cup in Lyon, France. “Sorry, but this is probably the second best trophy we won this week,” Morgan said to kick off her ESPYs acceptance speech. Then she shrugged and laughed. In addition to her exploits on the pitch, Morgan has been an outspoken proponent for parity in the pay between the women’s national soccer team and the men’s team. “I feel like we’re more than just a soccer team, we’re America’s team in a way, seeing everyone celebrate and support us through these successes,”  she told a reporter from SNY , a sports television network in New York, Tuesday after the team got back from France. “And knowing that so much rides on our success in terms of equal pay and being at the forefront of everything and speaking up from important issues that we feel passionate about.” Russell, who played basketball at McClymonds High School and the University of San Francisco before going on to a storied career with the Boston Celtics, was given the Arthur Ashe Award for Courage at the ESPYs. “I’m humbled to receive the Arthur Ashe Courage Award,” he said in a statement ahead of the awards ceremony. “Arthur was a man of great courage, that fought on and off the court for equality.” Serena Williams, who grew up in Southern California but now lives in the Bay Area, won the best female athlete award. Over the past year, she made it to the finals of the U.S. Open and Wimbledon after coming back from having a child in September 2017. And a Bay Area football coach, Rob Mendez of Prospect High School in Saratoga, Calif., is being honored with the Jimmy V Award for Perseverance. Mendez, who was born without limbs and coaches Prospect’s junior varsity football team, was featured on the cover of ESPN the Magazine. “I know I want to push myself to be the best coach I can be. I’ve never given up at anything. I’m not about to now,” he wrote in a personal essay on ESPN’s website . “And off the field, I want to keep inspiring people to chase their dreams, to never give up.” Drew Costley is an SFGATE editorial assistant. Email:  drew.costley@sfgate.com  | Twitter:  @drewcostley'

23 governors join California in opposing Trump mileage standards

Athletics Business Breaking News

Besides California and Puerto Rico, leaders of Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island,
'Besides California and Puerto Rico, leaders of Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin signed the mileage pledge.'