{{ 'Go back' | translate}}
Njus logo

IT news | Njus International

Tarzan Swings Into VR Later This Year In Episodic Adventure

IT UploadVR

Tarzan VR is on the way to headsets later this year in an episodic adventure.The game is in production from Primordian creator Stonepunk Studios and will be published by Fun Train, with plans to release it episodically later this year for
'Tarzan VR is on the way to headsets later this year in an episodic adventure.The game is in production from Primordian creator Stonepunk Studios and will be published by Fun Train, with plans to release it episodically later this year for PlayStation VR, Valve Index, HTC Vive and Oculus Rift S.The single player game based on the work of Edgar Rice Burroughs will let players embody the jungle-traversing titular character in “five open world environments, each offering its own unique set of geographical landscapes and challenges.Additionally, players will have access to unique Tarzan ‘jungle skills’ such as Call of the Wild, Earth Vision and Fish Eye,” according to a press release.Call of the Wild That means climbing, swinging, swimming and fighting across environments with different weapons and challenges in each.Tarzan VR’s creators are planning to release the project as five different “issues” starting late this year.The studio provided the following summaries for each segment of the story: Issue 1 – The Great Ape: Jane has been abducted by a group of invaders, and Tarzan must seek the wisdom of The Great Ape in order to find the trail of her mysterious captors.Issue 2 – Jagged Edge: Tarzan begins his pursuit of Jane’s captors and must make his way across the dangerous Cliffs of Kombatu where one misstep leads to certain doom.Issue 3 – The Dead of Night: As night draws in, the jungle swamp poses all manner of hidden dangers.Tarzan continues to pursue his quarry across the Sargos Swamps, and must face a familiar and deadly predator from a lost era.Issue 4 – Undertow:  The secret gate to an undersea temple lays buried in the ocean depths.There is only ONE way for Tarzan to continue his journey… straight down!Issue 5 – The Valley of Eden:  In this grand finale, TARZAN MUST RALLY HIS ALLIES IN THE SHADOW OF AN ERUPTING VOLCANO!Only the strange fruit found in the heart of the Valley of Eden can save the life of Tarzan’s true love.We’re looking forward to the chance to go hands-on with Tarzan VR. . The post Tarzan Swings Into VR Later This Year In Episodic Adventure appeared first on UploadVR .'

Microsoft HoloLens 2 Video Transports Us to Tokyo & into Mind of Developer Dreaming of Augmented Reality Companions

IT Augmented Reality News

When you're trying to pioneer a brand new category of technology, sometimes it's not enough to just have great tech. You also need to be able to tell a great story. You need to be able to capture the imagination.Along those lines, a new Microsoft
'When you're trying to pioneer a brand new category of technology, sometimes it's not enough to just have great tech. You also need to be able to tell a great story. You need to be able to capture the imagination.Along those lines, a new Microsoft HoloLens 2 promotional spot set in Japan does just that, providing a minimalist setting in which the possibilities around the HoloLens 2 are a little more apparent.Don't Miss: Hands-On with the HoloLens 2, the New Best Augmented Reality Experience You Can GetThe brief spot was first shown at the annual de:code event in May. In the video, we're .. more'

Smart Money Said 'Skip Bitcoin, Bet on Blockchain.' Not Any More

IT Slashdot

As cryptocurrency prices tumbled across the board last year, venture capitalists focused their attention on the promise of the underlying technology, the ledger known as blockchain. That, many said, was the smarter bet. Now, the tables have turned.
'As cryptocurrency prices tumbled across the board last year, venture capitalists focused their attention on the promise of the underlying technology, the ledger known as blockchain. That, many said, was the smarter bet. Now, the tables have turned. From a report: While Bitcoin's price has rebounded this year, a fresh batch of data shows the flow of cash into blockchain startups dropped dramatically. So far, traditional venture capital investments in blockchain companies have totaled $784 million via 227 deals, according to CB Insights. At that pace, businesses focusing on that technology may only draw $1.6 billion this year, down roughly 60% from a record $4.1 billion in 2018, the research firm said. Money coming from corporations is on \'an even sharper decline,\' despite interest from companies such as Facebook in creating their own digital coins, CB Insights said. Maturing startups are drawing less support, while young startups are faring better, it said. Read more of this story at Slashdot.'

‘ASTRO BOT’ Behind-the-scenes – Insights & Artwork from Sony’s JAPAN Studio

IT Road to VR

From the very first time we previewed an early build of ASTRO BOT Rescue Mission, it was clear that there was much care and craft behind the work.
'From the very first time we previewed an early build of  ASTRO BOT Rescue Mission , it was clear that there was much care and craft behind the work.At its October 2018 launch, the finished game not only didn’t disappoint, it saw critical praise, quickly becoming PSVR’s top rated title and even one of PS4’s top titles overall for 2018 . The reception was a testament to the undeniable art and skill of the creators at Sony Interactive Entertainment’s JAPAN Studio.But how did they succeed where so many others struggled?For the latest in our Insights & Artwork series, we spoke with Astro Bot’s  Creative Director and Producer, Nicolas Doucet, who gave us a glimpse into the game’s design process and a look at some of the artwork which guided the way.Update (July 19th, 2019) : Over at the official PlayStation Blog , Nicolas Doucet today shared some additional background on  Astro Bot’s development , which seemed fitting to include here to add to this deep-dive background on the game’s creation.Doucet shared a look at a ‘mecha spider’ enemy prototype which was ultimately cut from the game but lived on through similar mechanics which manifested in the ‘bamboo stack’ enemy, which the team found “simpler, clearer, more versatile, and gratifying to shoot.” Image courtesy SIE JAPAN Studio He showed how level segments were built modularly, which allowed them to be rearranged and even repurposed where needed.A segment of the Canyon stage was pulled from that level and visually adapted to fit right into the Volcano level.Image courtesy SIE JAPAN Studio Doucet also elaborated a bit on Astro Bot’s cut multiplayer mode , which was clearly a tough decision but seems to have ultimately worked out in the game’s favor. “It was probably the hardest cut we ever made, and it created some controversy within the team, especially because it felt like we were taking something of quality away,” he said. “But at times, such decisions are necessary for the greater good and there is no more regret today as it allowed the game — and the team — to reach new heights.” Continue reading below for our deep-dive with Doucet on Astro Bot’s development.Editor’s Note: The big, beautiful pictures and exclusive artwork in this article are best viewed on a desktop browser with a large screen, or in landscape orientation on your phone.All images courtesy SIE JAPAN Studio.Winding Roots Original Article (November 7th, 2018): While Astro Bot  has only been out for a month now, the game’s origin stretches at least back to 2013 when JAPAN Studio released  THE PLAYROOM , a piece of PS4 bundleware which was designed to show of the console’s then new camera peripheral.The Playroom included a series of mini-games where the studio’s adorable ‘bot’ characters were heavily featured.When PS4’s next major peripheral came along—PlayStation VR, which launched in 2016—JAPAN Studio was tasked with creating  The Playroom VR . Just like the game before it,  The Playroom VR was bundled as a showcase, and included a series of VR mini-games with the bots back in action.JAPAN Studio’s ‘bots’ were a fixture in THE PLAYROOM VR (2016) It was there in  The Playroom VR where Astro Bot’s  foundation was solidified.One mini-game called ‘Robot Rescue’ had players guiding one of the bot characters around a fantastical world from a third-person perspective, but still embodied the player as a first-person character in the game world.Looking back today, the fundamentals of ‘Robot Rescue’ and  Astro Bot  are one in the same, but with the latter, JAPAN Studio had the time and resources to fully explore what the mini-game could become. “To be honest, [‘Robot Rescue’] was the odd one out as all other games [in The Playroom VR ] were built as quick-fire party play.” Nicolas Doucet, Astro Bot’s Creative Director and Producer, tells  Road to VR . “As we released The Playroom VR , the gamers inside us loved ‘Robot Rescue’ because it is a game closer to classic gamers’ taste re-invented for VR, so we wanted to make a full game.” As it turned out, the interest in ‘Robot Rescue’ wasn’t just from within the studio. “The vast amount of [player] comments on the forums, videos, and petition gave us the boost we needed to go full steam.So shortly after releasing our DLC for The Playroom VR , we started working on Astro Bot Rescue Mission .” Image courtesy SIE JAPAN Studio 18 months later, and with a peak development team of 25,  Astro Bot was born.Packed full of smart VR game design, a distinctly ‘playable’ feel, and enough meat to feel satisfied by the end,  Astro Bot is the first game we’ve rated a 10 out of 10 . A game like Astro Bot  doesn’t just happen; it’s the product of talent, time, and direction. “One thing to establish first is that [JAPAN Studio’s] ASOBI Team is articulated around four key pillars that define the emotions our games must convey.They are ‘Magical’, ‘Innovative’, ‘Playful’ and ‘Inclusive’. These words are to be considered in their broad meaning and anything we create should be relatable to these four key pillars.” Doucet says.Months of Experimentation With that framework in mind, the team set aside one-third of the game’s development time for experimentation, before locking in key mechanics and interactions. “We prototyped lots and lots of mechanics for the first six months, as we always do.We then assembled the entire game from the various successful ideas,” says Doucet. “These prototypes happen over a very short time and are mostly made by programmers working on their own.We then gather everything that is fun and that gives us our tool set for interactions.We only bring art in once the gameplay is robust so there is no temptation to rely on graphics before the fundamental gameplay is proven.” Doucet and the team specifically set out to make sure  Astro Bot was more than  just a third-person platformer thrown into a VR headset. “[…] there was a strong desire for the game to not become a traditional platformer in panorama view.That would have no value for PS VR,” he says. “[…] so a checklist of ‘VR-ness’ was created, such as verticality, lateral gameplay, volume play, perspective play by leaning your body, proximity play to create a bond, far-distance play to create dramatic moments, and also physical play via the player’s head, blowing mechanics, etc.” Astro looks at the player’s avatar.Central to the game’s “VR-ness” is the way that it embodies the player as not just a camera but an actual character that’s present inside the virtual world.That’s reinforced especially with the PS4 controller which is motion tracked inside the game and becomes as critical to the gameplay input from buttons and sticks.This happens primarily through ‘gadgets’, virtual tools that attach to the in-game controller allowing the player to uniquely interact with both Astro and the environment. “It was important that these gadgets worked on several layers, at least three strong use cases to be precise,” Doucet says. “This is why the water gadget for example can be used to grow vegetation, activate propellers, and also harden lava.All of these use cases have a direct correlation with platforming (they essentially create a path for Astro and support the various ‘VR-ness’ [we were seeking].” In fact, there were a few gadgets—like a magnet and a vacuum cleaner—that got cut because they didn’t meet the bar of interactivity that the team had set.Continued on Page 2: Duality of Scales » . The post ‘ASTRO BOT’ Behind-the-scenes – Insights & Artwork from Sony’s JAPAN Studio appeared first on Road to VR .'

These Apollo 11 Augmented Reality Experiences from Google, USA Today, Time, & Smithsonian Will Fly You to the Moon

IT Augmented Reality News

Unless you've been hiding under a (moon) rock for the past month, you already know that Saturday, July 20 is the 50th anniversary of NASA's Apollo 11 lunar landing.And while it has been 50 years since man first visited the moon, no human has set
'Unless you've been hiding under a (moon) rock for the past month, you already know that Saturday, July 20 is the 50th anniversary of NASA's Apollo 11 lunar landing.And while it has been 50 years since man first visited the moon, no human has set foot on its surface since 1976. Luckily for us, augmented reality presents the opportunity to experience the Apollo 11 launch and landing, as well as the moonwalk, within our own, Earth-bound terrestrial boundaries.Don't Miss: Microsoft's Live HoloLens 2 Apollo 11 Demo Didn't Take Flight, but You Can See It Thanks to Unreal Engine's VideoThe John .. more'

A Rust-Based TLS Library Outperformed OpenSSL in Almost Every Category

IT Slashdot

A tiny and relatively unknown TLS library written in Rust, an up-and-coming programming language, outperformed the industry-standard OpenSSL in almost every major category. From a report: The findings are the result of a recent four-part series of
'A tiny and relatively unknown TLS library written in Rust, an up-and-coming programming language, outperformed the industry-standard OpenSSL in almost every major category. From a report: The findings are the result of a recent four-part series of benchmarks carried out by Joseph Birr-Pixton, the developer behind the Rustls library. The findings showed that Rustls was 10% faster when setting up and negotiating a new server connection, and between 20 and 40% faster when setting up a client connection. But while handshake speeds for new TLS connections are important, most TLS traffic relies on resuming previously negotiated handshakes. Here, too, Rustls outperformed the aging OpenSSL, being between 10 and 20% in resuming a connection on the server-side, and being between 30 and 70% quicker to resume a client connection. Furthermore, Rustls also fared better in sheer bulk performance -- or the speed at which data is transferred over the TLS connection. Birr-Pixton said Rustls could send data 15% faster than OpenSSL, and receive it 5% faster as well. Read more of this story at Slashdot.'