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Intense footage shows man narrowly avoiding a falling tree during tornado

Nature Mashable

You never know which instinct will kick in during an emergency — fight or flight. In this case, flight may have saved this man's life.  Home security footage captured a man's split-second decisions when a tornado headed straight his way. First, he
'You never know which instinct will kick in during an emergency — fight or flight. In this case, flight may have saved this man's life.  Home security footage captured a man's split-second decisions when a tornado headed straight his way. First, he begins to get in his car, but as soon as it seems like he's right in the tornado's path, he books it for a pond on the other side of the property.  That's when the tree starts coming down on him.  In the video description, his wife says he \'jumped into a pond even though he can't swim because it was the only chance he had to save his life.\'  Luckily, he made it out safely, but boy this guy could not catch a break from Mother Nature.  Read more.. More about Youtube , Viral Video , Tornado , Culture , and Climate Environment'

An all-female scientific expedition will take on the plastic problem.

Nature GOOD

”Women by nature have a nurturing instinct and are compelled to protect.”
'Each year, we produce so much plastic that by 2050, the amount of  plastic in the ocean  will outweigh fish - provided we don’t slow down. To tackle the problem, an  all-female expedition  will set out to make sure this doesn’t happen by “raising awareness of, and explore solutions to, the devastating environmental and health impacts of single-use plastics and toxics in the world’s ocean.”  The expedition, which is conducted by an organization called eXXpedition, will start in October.  Three hundred women  with diverse backgrounds will cover 38,000 nautical miles, visiting some of the most polluted oceans on the planet. The first eXXpedition voyage took place in 2014, and since then, more than 100 women from 14 different nationalities have been on 11 voyages. And they’ve already produced change. Thanks to eXXpedition, microbeads in beauty products are now banned. They’ve been banned since 2015, and we didn’t even miss them!  Plastic is an environmental issue, but it’s also a women’s issue. “Some of these issues, particularly chemicals getting into our bodies, are quite a female issue because they’re endocrine disruptors, they mimic our hormones. And so we wanted to tackle this problem with a team of women. Hence eXXpedition began, to get women to study this issue of plastic and toxic pollution,” eXXpedition co-founder  Emily Penn  told Time .  Plastics have been found guilty of causing  early puberty  in girls, as well as interfering with hormones during pregnancy. And it turns out, they’re great at working their way into places they shouldn’t be in. The women who have participated in eXXpedition have used their own bodies as research subjects. At one point, every single member of the crew found they had at least some of the 35 chemicals banned by the UN for being toxic in their systems.  EXXpedition has had participants from all disciplines to participate in the project.  Crew members  have included scientists, teachers, filmmakers, product designers, photographers and athletes. But all are women.  “I guess women by nature have a nurturing instinct and are compelled to protect. We all share one ocean regardless of where we come from so this is an issue that transcends all political boundaries and borders. We need a multi-disciplinary and a multicultural approach to solving the problem. And women do well in mediating and collaborating and coming together for something that they care about. I wouldn’t like to exclude men from the cause. It’s really important that all of us find our role and work together,”  Penn says .  EXXpedition takes  applications  through their website, no experience necessary. You, too, can save the world and have a little fun doing it.'

Animal testing in the UK has fallen to its lowest level since 2007

Nature Best World News

Scientific testing on live animals has fallen to its lowest level since 2007, official figures have revealed.Researchers carried out 3.52 million procedures on living animals in England, Scotland and Wales last year, a decrease of 7% from 2017.
'Scientific testing on live animals has fallen to its lowest level since 2007, official figures have revealed.Researchers carried out 3.52 million procedures on living animals in England, Scotland and Wales last year, a decrease of 7% from 2017.Around half (1.8 million) of procedures were experimental, while the other 1.72 million were for the creation and breeding of genetically altered animals, data from the Home Office revealed.The majority of procedures (93%) used mice, fish and rats, which have been the most used for the past decade.However, the use of rats in experimental procedures fell by 27%. The number of experimental procedures on birds increased from 130,000 to 147,000.Specially protected species – cats, dogs, horses and primates – accounted for 1% (18,000) of experimental procedures.The number of experiments with cats decreased by 20%, but the number using dogs rose 16%, and the number on primates increased by 8%.   More than half (56%) of experimental procedures were carried out for basic research – most commonly focusing on the immune system, the nervous system and cancer.Procedures for creating and breeding decreased by 10%, while experimental procedures fell by 4%. The data represents the number of procedures conducted on animals, not the number of animals that were involved.Since 2014, the Home Office, which is responsible for regulating animal experiments, has classified testing according to the amount of suffering it causes.Of the 3.52 million procedures performed last year, 38.9% were assessed as mild, 14.7% moderate and 3.6% severe.More than two-fifths (40.2%) were considered sub-threshold – discomfort measured as less than a needle prick.Understanding Animal Research, which promotes openness about animal research, released data showing 10 organisations account for nearly half of animal research in Britain.They carried out 1.69 million procedures, 48% of the 3.52 million procedures in Britain in 2018.More than 99% of these were carried out on rodents or fish.The 10 organisations are the Medical Research Council, the Francis Crick Institute, the University of Oxford, the University of Edinburgh, University College London, the University of Cambridge, the University of Glasgow, King’s College London, the University of Manchester and Imperial College London.All of the institutes have signed up to Concordat on Openness on Animal Research in the UK.They are also committed to the “3Rs” of replacement, reduction and refinement.This means avoiding or replacing the use of animals where possible, minimising the number of animals used per experiment, and optimising the experience of the animals to improve welfare.Frances Rawle, director of policy, ethics and governance at the Medical Research Council, said: ‘The use of animals in medical research remains essential for us to develop new and better treatments and to understand the biology of disease. ‘If researchers are applying for funding for studies involving animals, they must give clear scientific reasons for using them and explain why there are no realistic alternatives. ‘The MRC is committed to ensuring that these programmes are carried out to the highest possible levels of animal welfare and to replacing, refining and reducing the use of animals in research.’ Professor Julian Downward, associate research director at the Francis Crick Institute, said: ‘As the country’s largest biomedical research institute, we have a particular responsibility to be open about our use of animals in research. ‘While we use alternatives wherever possible, living animals are incredibly complex and there are many processes we simply can’t simulate.’ Source: Read Full Article . The post Animal testing in the UK has fallen to its lowest level since 2007 appeared first on Best World News .'

Mutilated elephant with its tusks and trunk cut off by ivory poachers

Nature Best World News


'Cut into pieces for profit: Brutal image shows mutilated elephant with its tusks and trunk cut off by ivory poachers in Botswana where hunting ban was lifted in May Elephant’s carcass was left abandoned in the field in Botswana after poachers killed it and removed its trunk  The ivory hunters killed the elephant and took animals tusks, cutting them and the trunk off with chainsaws Poaching in Botswana increasing, with estimated 593 per cent rise in number of carcasses found in the north A disturbing photograph of a mutilated African elephant with its severed trunk still next to it shows the horror of ivory poaching in northern Botswana.The drone photograph, called ‘Disconnection’, was taken by documentary filmmaker Justin Sullivan and comes after Botswana lifted a ban on hunting the animals in May.Poachers use chainsaws to cut off the trunk and tusks of the elephants and the shocking photo shows how animal carcasses are just abandoned by hunters.Another brutal photo shows the inside of the elephant’s head after it was killed by the ivory poachers.Poaching in Botswana is increasing rapidly, with an estimated 593 per cent rise in the number of carcasses in the Northern parts of the country from 2014 to 2018.The shocking photo was taken by documentary filmmaker Justin Sullivan and shows an elephant carcass left abandoned by ivory poachers in Botswana The photograph has now been selected for the prestigious Andrei Stenin International Press Photo Contest, the results of which will be announced in September.Justin, 28, from Cape Town, South Africa, said he was filming for a private company in Botswana and overheard rangers talking about the poached elephant.He said: ‘They said an elephant had just been poached and I asked to be taken to the site.On arrival I used a drone to capture the image. ‘The image is called ‘Disconnection’, the perspective of the image gives context to the situation which you would never be able to see from the ground. ‘The high angle looking top down shows isolation and highlights not only the physical disconnection of the animal, but our disconnection from the situation.Poaching is rising rapidly in Botswana.Poachers use chainsaws to cut off the trunk and tusks of the elephants and the shocking photo shows how animal carcasses are just abandoned by hunters ‘The image has drawn a lot of attention.People have obviously reacted with mixed feelings of anger and sadness, especially with the recent lift on the hunting ban in Botswana, but this photo has driven some constructive dialogue around how we can promote more sustainable elephant conversation and solve our current ecological crisis.’  The photo comes after a leading conservation group warned of surging elephant poaching in parts of Botswana and estimated nearly 400 were killed across the country in 2017 and 2018, according to a report published Thursday, adding to conservation concerns.The Elephants Without Borders research in the scientific journal ‘Current Biology’ will likely increase pressure on Botswana, which last month sparked sparked controversy by lifting its ban on hunting.Nearly 400 elephants were killed across the country in 2017 and 2018 after Botswana President Mokgweetsi Masisi lifted the country’s five-year ban on elephant hunting, citing increasing ‘conflicts between humans and elephants’ The government said it would help control a booming population that was damaging farmers’ livelihoods.Thursday’s report noted a 593 per cent increase in fresh elephant carcasses in the north of the country since 2014, with many of these found clustered in five northern ‘hotspots’. ‘This evidence suggests that ivory poaching on the scale of hundreds of elephants per year has been occurring in northern Botswana since 2017 or possibly earlier,’ the report said.EWB last year said it had identified nearly 90 elephants thought to have been poached after an aerial survey, a number that was vigorously contested by the government.The country, which has the largest elephant population in Africa, has previously been a haven for elephants with ‘little poaching reported’ in a 2014 survey.However, last month, President Mokgweetsi Masisi lifted the country’s five-year ban on elephant hunting, citing increasing ‘conflicts between humans and elephants’. This decision provoked an outcry from environmental protection organisations.Botswana’s abundant wildlife has made it a popular luxury safari destination and tourism is the second fastest growing sector of the country’s economy after diamond mining.Source: Read Full Article . The post Mutilated elephant with its tusks and trunk cut off by ivory poachers appeared first on Best World News .'