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3D-print companies are paving their own path in the housing market

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Some have speculated it could be the solution to the country’s affordable housing crisis by providing a quick infusion of lower-priced homes in areas starved for housing inventory. Some affordable housing experts, however, caution that the
'Some have speculated it could be the solution to the country’s affordable housing crisis by providing a quick infusion of lower-priced homes in areas starved for housing inventory. Some affordable housing experts, however, caution that the technology is not a panacea. We've all seen videos of a giant robotic arm assembling layers of material which would later turn into a completed home 12-24 hours later. Some companies are imagining how this type of technology could impact homelessness and affordable housing. Although 3D-printed homes are a favorable alternative, why has the housing industry remained slow in adopting this building method? According to a Politico Magazine piece written by Shawna Chen, the gap between housing development and 3D manufacturing could be closing.  New Story and ICON’s first 3D-printed home model in Austin, TX. Image © New Story Dee Walsh the chief officer of strategic development for Mercy Housing shares with Chen, The cost to build housing and the amount of subsidy or low-cost financing available to make it affordable—there’s a gap there,” Walsh said. “We don’t have enough subsidy and soft financing to make traditional housing affordable. … The low markets are probably around $150,000 to $200,000 a unit; that would be…'