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Men's Health Checklist for Every Age

Health care Consumer Reports

It can be challenging to keep track of all the tests, vaccines, and preventive health measures a man needs to be healthy throughout his life. That may be one reason a 2016 American Academy of Fam..
'Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site. Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site. It can be challenging to keep track of all the tests, vaccines, and preventive health measures a man needs to be healthy throughout his life. That may be one reason a 2016  American Academy of Family Physicians survey found that men often don’t take prescriptions as directed or get routine tests that doctors ordered. On the plus side, about 64 percent of men said they’d seen a doctor within the previous six months, according to the  latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  (PDF). Developing a relationship with your primary healthcare provider is a smart move, says John Meigs Jr., M.D., a past president of the AAFP and a family doctor in Centreville, Ala. “It’s extremely important that men—and women—have a regular source of care that they see on some kind of regular basis,” he says. To help men safeguard their health, we’ve gathered recommendations from the CDC, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (a national, independent panel of medical experts), and the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation’s  Choosing Wisely initiative , as well as experts in men’s and preventive healthcare. Here are the screening tests and vaccinations men need and the smart steps they should take in their  20s and 30s ,  40s and 50s , and  60s and beyond . (And here’s a similar  checklist for women .) What Men Should Do in Their 20s and 30s Vaccinations Flu shot , every year. Tetanus booster, every 10 years. Whooping cough vaccine  (Tdap booster) unless you’re certain you had one as a preteen or teenager. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine , if you’re younger than 21 and haven’t received it yet, or if you’re younger than 26 and have sex with men. Screening Tests Sexually transmitted disease : If you’re sexually active and have sex with men, get screened at least once a year for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. And all men should get tested for HIV at least once. According to the CDC , everyone between ages 13 and 64 should be tested during their lifetime. (If you have certain risk factors , you’ll need additional screenings.) Blood pressure : Have it checked at least once every two years. Cholesterol : Have your cholesterol tested every four to six years, depending on results. If you have heart disease or diabetes, a family history of heart disease, or other cardiac risk factors, you may need to do this more often. Type 2 diabetes : If you’re overweight or obese and have one or more other risk factors, such as a family history of diabetes or high blood pressure or cholesterol, have a blood test every three years, depending on results. Review With Your Doctor Sexual history and condom use. Diet, exercise, and sleep habits. Smoking , alcohol consumption, and any other substance-use habits. Men’s Health Tips Early adulthood is an ideal time to develop an ongoing working relationship with a family or primary care doctor, Meigs says. That way, you’ll have someone you trust—and who is familiar with your lifestyle and health history—to talk to about any health concerns. That’s important when it comes to diseases that may be uncomfortable to discuss or that don’t get regularly screened for, such as testicular cancer, Meigs says. In this case, for example, some men might ignore symptoms, and the USPSTF recommends against regular screening for the cancer because it is relatively rare and has a high survival rate. Still, testicular cancer is the most common cancer among men ages 15 to 34. If you discover a lump or have pain in a testicle, it’s important to tell your doctor. And while the CDC’s baseline recommendations for yearly STD screenings are directed mainly at women and at men who have sex with men, Ana Fadich, M.P.H., vice president of the nonprofit health education group Men’s Health Network, says all men should consider STD testing any time they change sexual partners. Men will need to request this screening at the doctor’s office, Fadich says, because there’s no men’s health equivalent of the well-woman visit, in which STD screenings are routine. What Men Should Do in Their 40s and 50s Vaccinations Flu shot , every year. Tetanus booster, every 10 years. Shingrix (shingles) vaccine  at age 50. Screening Tests Sexually transmitted disease : If you’re sexually active and have sex with men, get screened at least once a year for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. Blood pressure : Have it checked at least once every two years. Cholesterol : Continue blood tests for cholesterol every four to six years, depending on risk factors and results. After 40, your doctor will use an equation to assess your 10-year risk for heart disease. Type 2 diabetes : If you’re overweight or obese and have one or more other risk factors, such as a family history of diabetes or high blood pressure or cholesterol, have a blood test every three years, depending on results. Otherwise, get tested at age 45.  Colorectal cancer : At age 45, talk to your doctor about when to begin screening for colon cancer; most people can start screening at age 50, though controversial new guidelines from the American Cancer Society suggest that men consider starting at age 45. A colonoscopy every 10 years, a stool test every year, and a few other screening options are available. Ask your doctor which one may be best for you. Prostate cancer: Regular prostate specific antigen (PSA) tests, which may detect prostate cancer, might not be necessary. Be sure to talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of the test. If you’re concerned about prostate cancer , talk with your doctor at 55 or earlier about whether you’re at increased risk. Review With Your Doctor Sexual history and condom use. Diet, exercise, and  sleep habits . Smoking, alcohol consumption, and any other substance-use habits. Men’s Health Tips During these years, your cardiovascular risk factors , such as high blood pressure and weight gain, might rise, Meigs says. (For more on your cardiovascular risk, see our recent report here .) And because metabolism naturally slows with age, he says, it’s especially important for men in this age group to stay active and keep up with good eating habits. That will help you maintain a healthy weight and reduce heart disease risks. When it comes to prostate cancer screening, “That requires a conversation with your doctor,” Meigs says. In May 2018 the USPSTF updated its guidelines, and experts differ on whether men should be routinely checked for signs of the cancer using a PSA test. The USPSTF does not recommend this blood test unless men request it, after first hearing about the potential benefits and risks of being tested. Talk with your doctor about your personal risk profile for prostate cancer; people who have a family history of prostate cancer or are African American or of African descent might be at higher risk. What Men Should Do in Their 60s and Beyond Vaccinations Flu shot , every year. Tetanus booster, every 10 years. Shingrix (shingles) vaccine if you haven’t already received it. Two pneumonia vaccines , starting at 65. The CDC recommends a dose of what’s known as PCV13 (Prevnar) first. At least one year later, get a dose of PPSV23 (Pneumovax). Screening Tests Sexually transmitted disease : If you’re sexually active and have sex with men, get screened at least once a year for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. Blood pressure : Have it checked at least once every two years. Cholesterol : Continue blood tests for cholesterol every four to six years, depending on risk factors and results. Type 2 diabetes : Have this testing every three years, depending on results. Colorectal cancer : Continue screening with a colonoscopy every 10 years, a stool test every year, or sigmoidoscopy every five years with a stool test every three years. Other colon cancer screening options are available; ask your doctor which may be best for you. You can stop colon cancer screening at age 75. Abdominal aortic aneurysm: If you’ve ever smoked, the USPSTF currently recommends that you have an ultrasound to test for abdominal aortic aneurysm—an enlarged area in the aorta that can rupture if it gets too large—sometime between ages 65 and 75. Review With Your Doctor Sexual history and condom use. Diet, exercise, and sleep habits. Smoking, alcohol consumption, and any other substance-use habits. Men’s Health Tips Losing a partner or ending a relationship can return you to the singles pool—which can come with an increased risk of contracting an STD, Fadich says. That’s why it’s wise to continue using condoms during sex, even if pregnancy is no longer a risk for your partner. It’s important to keep tabs on your brainpower and mental health as well. “At this age, folks begin to worry about getting forgetful ,” Meigs says. Staying socially involved and physically active can be good for your emotional well-being and cognition, he notes. A study from the British Journal of Sports Medicine shows that aerobic exercise and strength training , as well as tai chi , can improve brain function in people older than 50, even for those who are beginning to experience cognitive decline. ( Avoid memory supplements , however.) Try to keep up with a regular exercise routine: The CDC recommends 30 minutes of aerobic exercise per day five days a week and two days per week of strength training for older adults. Additional reporting by Chris Hendel. Consumer Reports is an independent, nonprofit organization that works side by side with consumers to create a fairer, safer, and healthier world. CR does not endorse products or services, and does not accept advertising. Copyright © 2019, Consumer Reports, Inc.'

Taylor Swift Calls Yonkers Lung Transplant Patient After Heartwarming Video Goes Viral – CBS New York

Health care USA New Updates

YONKERS, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) – Music superstar Taylor Swift took the time to reach out to a gravely ill young woman from Yonkers this weekend. Friends of 22-year-old Annie McMahon tweeted video of a dance party they held in her hospital room, asking
'YONKERS, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) – Music superstar Taylor Swift took the time to reach out to a gravely ill young woman from Yonkers this weekend. Friends of 22-year-old Annie McMahon tweeted video of a dance party they held in her hospital room, asking Swift to contact their friend, who’s a huge fan. McMahon has cystic fibrosis. She’s had two double lung transplants and is too sick for a third. She’s now in hospice care. That video snowballed on social media, and got the popular singer’s attention. Swift called the 22-year-old Saturday and they reportedly talked for nearly 20 minutes. “I was nervous going into it because what do you say to someone you look up to… It was like talking to someone I knew my whole life,” McMahon said. McMahon said she hopes she will be able to meet Swift one day.'

Bone-marrow transplant lets sun shine on toddler for Father’s Day

Health care USA New Updates

Kelsey Lock’s ideal Father’s Day involves eating ice cream in the park with his daughter — a simple plan, but one bordering on miraculous.Lock’s daughter, Charlie, was born with erythropoietic protoporphyria or EPP, a disease sometimes described as
'Kelsey Lock’s ideal Father’s Day involves eating ice cream in the park with his daughter — a simple plan, but one bordering on miraculous.Lock’s daughter, Charlie, was born with erythropoietic protoporphyria or EPP, a disease sometimes described as an allergy to the sun. Since she was a baby, ultraviolet light, even in minuscule amounts, would cause the little girl’s skin to burn, blister and swell. More insidious, it would also begin to destroy her liver.As a result, Charlie’s life was lived inside. The world beyond the tinted glass of her Langley home was largely unknown to the toddler, now 3.“Any time we’d see a playground, it was rough,” recalled Lock. “To see other kids playing outside and know that Charlie could never do that was really hard.”Late last year, Charlie’s liver began to fail. It is impossible to prevent all exposure to ultraviolet light. Unseen, porphyrins had been accumulating in the toddler’s liver, causing it to swell to three times its normal size.People with EPP have a shortage of an enzyme that metabolizes porphyrins, which help with the production of hemoglobin. Without the enzyme, porphyrins accumulate in the blood, reacting with sunlight to cause burns. In a small percentage of people with EPP, including Charlie, they also accumulate in the liver.To save his daughter’s life, Lock was asked to donate part of his liver. The family travelled to the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto for the procedure. Working in a darkened operating room, a surgeon removed Charlie’s damaged liver and gave her a piece of her dad’s liver.“I don’t think about it too much,” said Lock, “but every now and then, it hits me. I can say that I’ll always be there for her, and it’s literally true. I will.”Related \t\tBut Charlie’s journey — from the family apartment with tinted windows in Langley to a park in Toronto on Father’s Day — was only beginning. Charlie Lock, 2, during her first severe reaction to the Sun. Submitted photo – Bekah Lock / PNG Doctors told the family they were essentially rewriting the playbook with Charlie’s case. Porphyria is rare, and EPP rarer still. Charlie’s form, which destroys the liver, hasn’t been the subject of much research. But because the toddler still had porphyria, the cause of her liver failure hadn’t been addressed by the transplant. The cycle would begin again.So Lock was tapped to donate his bone marrow. A perfect match would give Charlie’s body the ability to create the enzyme that breaks down porphyrins, essentially curing both her liver problems and sun allergy. But no one in Charlie’s family was a perfect match. Because the girl has two exceptionally rare genetic markers, there were no matches on the international bone marrow registry either.Still, doctors believed there was a good chance Lock’s bone marrow could at least prevent the destruction of Charlie’s new liver.“The idea is that the bone marrow reprograms your entire blood-making system, but how well that would work was unclear,” explained Charlie’s mom, Bekah Lock.In February, Kelsey Lock watched as blood was drawn from his body and passed through a sophisticated machine that looked like a “crazy water clock” to filter the stem cells from the rest. A few days before the procedure, he’d been given a medication that caused his bone marrow cells to leach into his blood, which left him feeling strange.“I could feel all my bones,” he said. “When I stood up fast, I’d feel pressure in my ribs.”Lock’s bone marrow was given to Charlie, after her own bone marrow and immune system had been wiped out by two weeks of chemotherapy.Almost four months after the procedure, the family remains hesitant to use the word “cure.” Charlie Lock at age 1 with her mother Bekah. Nick Procaylo / PNG The transplant was largely a success. Early results showed 100 per cent engraftment, which meant Charlie’s bone marrow cells had been replaced by her dad’s cells and they were functioning as they should. The number has dropped a little since then.“I’d say cautiously optimistic,” said Bekah, when asked how the family is feeling about the future.After eight months in Toronto, the family wants to come home. Charlie still has several small hurdles to clear related to the liver transplant. The doctors are also monitoring her bone marrow numbers. Her immune system remains severely compromised from the transplants. But the family has been told they could be back in B.C. by fall.Charlie’s first foray into the world outside her window was a quiet affair.A few days before, her parents brought her to the wall of windows fronting the hospital. As they looked over the city, the little girl seemed content and comfortable despite the light flooding the corridor.In early April, Charlie received permission to leave the hospital for a few hours. Instead of bundling her into a vehicle with tinted windows, the family walked in the sunshine to their apartment at Ronald McDonald House.“I kept the cover off the stroller,” said Bekah. “It was kind of anti-climatic in a way, but it was also very, very sweet.”For Kelsey Lock, the time in Toronto has been an opportunity to spend unlimited hours with Charlie. On leave from his job as a framer, he said it feels like he’s being “forced to take a vacation.”His Father’s Day will be about simple pleasures: An ice cream cone, a park and a little girl with the whole world before her.Related \t\t gluymes@postmedia.com twitter.com/glendaluymes CLICK HERE to report a typo. Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email vantips@postmedia.com'

Family Demands Answers After Wheelchair Ramps For Son With Cerebral Palsy Stolen From South Philadelphia Home

Health care CBS Philly

The Dolans say the ramps were in place at their South Philadelphia home for the past five years.
'PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – A South Philadelphia family is rightfully outraged after they say someone stole wheelchair ramps their 15-year-old son with Cerebral Palsy needs to get out of his house. Tina and Joe Dolan say the ramps used by their son Dominic were in place at their Greenwich Street home for the past five years. At least that was the cause until Thursday afternoon when they say someone took the ramps, now making it much harder for Dominic to leave his home. Furious, and with Dominic now confined to the top step, the Dolan family are demanding answers about the theft that happened some time on Thursday. “It’s very important because that’s our only means of getting Dominic in and out of the house. Without the ramp, we can’t get him out,” Tina said. “It’s important for my son to get him on the school bus, to get him outside to play, go to the park, anything.” ‘She Was Greatly Loved’: Mother Of 5 Shot And Killed Inside North Philadelphia Deli, Police Say “We haven’t been out, this is it, to the top step,” she added. “That’s all we do. Long ago I was able to put him on my back, I can’t do it no more. Devastated, shocked. Who would do something like that? You knew somebody who was disabled had to use it, it’s not just a ramp for somebody to play with.” They have since filed a police report, but have a theory as why someone would steal the ramps, knowing the ramps would be of little practical use to anyone. The Dolans suspect the thief took the ramps to scrap the aluminum money for extra money. College Possible Helping Hundreds Of Philadelphia-Area High School Students Take Leap Of Faith Into Higher Education Even with the tremendous setback, Tina says Dominic doesn’t let things like this get him down. “Even when he’s upset, he never complains,” she said. “He’s my angel, this is my hero over here.” The family has set up a GoFundMe page to replace the stolen ramps. You can donate by going to: https://www.gofundme.com/f/stolen-wheelchair-ramps . CBS3’s Chantee Lans contributed to this report.'

Minnesota Nurses Association, Children’s Hospitals Reach Agreement

Health care WCCO | CBS Minnesota

The Minnesota Nurses Association reached a tentative agreement on a new three-year contract with Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota early Saturday morning.
'MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The Minnesota Nurses Association says the threat of a strike has been withdrawn. They reached a tentative agreement on a new three-year contract with Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota early Saturday morning. The association says the hospital has agreed to provide nurses with a 3% wage increase over the next two years. Negotiations came to a head Thursday when nurses authorized a strike, rejecting a previous offer . Nurses and negotiation teams then met over a 21-hour session and finally agreed on a contract around 5 a.m. A main sticking point for the nurses union was the cost of health insurance. Children’s agreed to cap the rate of increase for the most comprehensive insurance plan to match the increase the employer must pay. The pay increase will be 3% this year, 3% next year and just more than 2% in 2021. Both sides say they are happy with this agreement. “It was time to become compatible. We recognize that health insurance is increasing for everybody, but the increase that we were experiencing as nurses was not, we were not able to keep up with that,” said Trisha Ochsner, of the Minnesota Nurses Association. In a statement, Children’s Minnesota said it was pleased with the deal. “Children’s has come to the bargaining table each time in good faith, and both sides have accomplished a lot over the last several bargaining sessions,” the statement reads. “We have improved workplace safety, boosted wages and agreed to improvements on other issues recognizing the important work nurses do for Children’s every day.” Contract talks started back in March. Nurses will now take another vote Thursday to ratify the new agreement.'

Queens rehab program under investigation faces closure amid opioid crisis

Health care New York Post

A taxpayer-funded drug treatment program in Queens will be shuttered unless it gets new management, sources told The Post. The state Attorney General’s office and the state Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services are investigating the
'A taxpayer-funded drug treatment program in Queens will be shuttered unless it gets new management, sources told The Post. The state Attorney General’s office and the state Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services are investigating the J-CAP program in Jamaica. A spokesman for OASAS — which provided $4.3 million in funding last year —..'

Woman Living With Crippling Pain Diagnosed With Nutcracker Syndrome

Health care CBS Dallas / Fort Worth

A Methodist Dallas Medical Center doctor diagnosed a 25-year-old woman suffering from crippling pain with a rare renal condition.
'DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) — A Methodist Dallas Medical Center doctor diagnosed a 25-year-old woman suffering from crippling pain with a rare renal condition. Michelle Griffith was diagnosed with Nutcracker Syndrome, where pressure on the renal vein, which drains the kidneys, is similar to the pressure a nutcracker puts on a walnut. Michelle Griffith (Credit: Family photo) Symptoms include blood in the urine and abdominal or flank pain that may be worsened by sitting or walking. Griffith’s symptoms started when she went away to college. But her abdominal pain grew to be so severe, it started to interfere with her daily tasks and caused her to lose 40 pounds. “That was probably the hardest, darkest time of this whole experience,” she said. “It basically felt like what I imagine a heart attack would feel like, but in my abdomen, every single day.” And after visiting dozens of doctors and taking several diagnostic tests, Griffith still had no answer. Her mother Selva said doctors, “just kind of threw their hands up in the air and said, ‘You know, maybe she needs to just go on vacation and eat fruit.'” But that all changed when Griffith was seen by her 50th doctor, Methodist Dallas’s Surgical Director of Kidney and Pancreas Transplants, Richard Dickerman. Selva said Dickerman recognized and acknowledged Griffith’s Nutcracker Syndrome and came up with a plan. “Physicians have to be aware of it before they make the diagnosis,” Dickerman said. “The pain is caused by the blockage of blood coming out of the kidneys.” Alleviating the blockage involves “unhooking” the kidney and moving it to the other side of the body. Surgeons at Methodist Dallas used a robot — da Vinci — to perform the autotransplant with smaller incisions and a faster recovery time. They are the only team in Texas to perform this procedure. “Because you have smaller incisions you decrease the risk of hernias, complications and infections,” Methodist Dallas’s Director of the Organ Transplant Program, Alejandro Mejia. Griffith is six weeks out from surgery and now has two kidneys on the same side. She said she is no longer relying on a walker or wheelchair to get around. “I feel like finally, I’m able to think of the future again,” Griffith said. “There will always be someone who can help, and they deserve to find that person. I found my person.”'

Nurse with HIV accused of stealing patients’ pain medication

Health care USA New Updates

Kyle Evans, 29, faces charges of tampering with a consumer product and drug diversion. Kyle Evans, 29, faces charges of tampering with a consumer product and drug diversion. SAN ANTONIO, Texas — A Texas nurse allegedly stole drug vials meant for
'Kyle Evans, 29, faces charges of tampering with a consumer product and drug diversion.\t\t\t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t\t\tKyle Evans, 29, faces charges of tampering with a consumer product and drug diversion. \t\tSAN ANTONIO, Texas — A Texas nurse allegedly stole drug vials meant for patients so he could inject himself with pain medication before refilling the vials with another liquid. Bexar County court records show Kyle Evans, 29, faces charges of tampering with a consumer product and drug diversion. Authorities say the Northeast Methodist Hospital employee was caught in February after stealing five vials of a pain medicine called hydromorphone. Evans allegedly lifted the vials from a Pyxis MedStation, an automated medication dispensing machine. Evans later admitted to injecting the drugs with a syringe while working, telling investigators he refilled the vials with a saline solution and glued the tops shut, according to an affidavit obtained by the San Antonio Express-News . Lab tests on the liquid are still pending, but some of the samples have tested positive for lidocaine. Evans is HIV positive, according to the affidavit, and investigators have not yet been able to determine if he used the same syringe to inject himself and refill the vials, potentially putting patients at risk of contracting the disease. Evans was booked into the Bexar County Jail.'

Minnesota Nurses Association, Children’s Hospital Reach Agreement

Health care WCCO | CBS Minnesota

The Minnesota Nurses Association says they have withdrawn the threat of a strike.
'MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The Minnesota Nurses Association says they have withdrawn the threat of a strike. They reached a tentative agreement on a new three-year contract with Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota early Saturday morning. The association says the hospital has agreed to provide nurses with a 3% wage increase over the next two years. Nurses were authorized to strike Thursday after the association rejected a previous offer . A vote to ratify the agreement is Thursday.'