{{ 'Go back' | translate}}
Njus logo

Construction: Crew members of targeted Norwegian-owned tanker now in Dubai | Njus USA

Crew members of targeted Norwegian-owned tanker now in Dubai

Construction USA New Updates

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Crew members from a Norwegian-owned oil tanker apparently attacked in the Gulf of Oman landed Saturday in Dubai after two days in Iran as the other tanker targeted in… DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Crew
'DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Crew members from a Norwegian-owned oil tanker apparently attacked in the Gulf of Oman landed Saturday in Dubai after two days in Iran as the other tanker targeted in… \t\t\t\t\t\t\t\tDUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Crew members from a Norwegian-owned oil tanker apparently attacked in the Gulf of Oman landed Saturday in Dubai after two days in Iran as the other tanker targeted in the assault limped into anchorage off the eastern coast of the United Arab Emirates. Both the mariners’ recollection and the physical evidence remaining on the MT Front Altair and the Kokuka Courageous, now off the coast of Fujairah, will play an important role in determining who the international community blames for Thursday’s explosions on board the oil tankers. Already, the U.S. has blamed Iran for what it described as an attack with limpet mines on the two tankers, pointing to black-and-white footage it captured that American officials describe as Iranian Revolutionary Guard troops removing an unexploded mine from the Kokuka Courageous. Tehran rejects the allegation, instead accusing the U.S. under President Donald Trump of pursuing an “Iranophobic” campaign against it. However, Iran previously used mines against oil tankers in 1987 and 1988 in the “Tanker War,” which saw the U.S. Navy escort ships through the region — something American officials may consider doing again. In a new allegation Saturday, the U.S. military accused Iranian Revolutionary Guard troops of trying but failing to shoot down a U.S. drone to disrupt surveillance of the tankers during the attacks. All this comes after four other oil tankers off Fujairah suffered similar attacks in recent weeks, and Iranian-allied rebels from Yemen have struck U.S. ally Saudi Arabia with drones and missiles. Late Saturday, Yemen’s Iranian-backed Houthi rebels claimed a new drone attack targeting Saudi Arabia, the latest in their recent campaign that has stepped up amid the Mideast tensions. Yahia al-Sarie, a Houthi spokesman, said their drones targeted airports in Jizan and Abha in Saudi Arabia. Early Sunday, the Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen said it shot down a drone near the Abha regional airport, but did not acknowledge the Jizan claim. The Houthis say they launched a cruise missile that struck the Abha airport Wednesday, an attack Saudi Arabia says wounded 26 people. Trump withdrew America last year from the 2015 nuclear deal that Iran reached with world powers and recently imposed a series of sanctions now squeezing its beleaguered economy and cutting deeply into its oil exports. While Iran maintains it has nothing to do with the recent attacks, its leaders repeatedly have threatened to close the vital Strait of Hormuz, through which 20 percent of the world’s oil flows. On Saturday, Associated Press journalists saw the crew members of Front Altair after their Iran Air flight from Bandar Abbas, Iran, landed at Dubai International Airport. Ten of its 23 mariners walked out to be greeted by officials who earlier could be heard saying the others would be catching connecting flights. The officials repeatedly refused to identify themselves to journalists. They and the mariners declined to take questions. The Front Altair caught fire after the attack Thursday, sending a thick cloud of black smoke visible even by satellite from space. A passing ship rescued the mariners, who later were turned over to Iranian officials. Iran took the mariners to Jask, then later Bandar Abbas before putting them on the flight Saturday night. Its crew was comprised of 11 Russians, 11 Filipinos and one Georgian. Meanwhile on Saturday, the Kokuka Courageous arrived off the coast of Fujairah. Journalists in the city could not reach the vessel, as boat captains said authorities instructed them not to go near the stricken vessel. The Kokuka Courageous is the vessel where Iranian Revolutionary Guard troops were filmed Thursday removing something from the ship’s hull. The U.S. military says they removed an unexploded limpet mine, which can be magnetically attached to a vessel. The implication is that Iran wanted to remove any evidence that could link them to the attack. Weapons experts can examine a mine for clues about its manufacturer. The black-and-white video shared Friday by the U.S. military’s Central Command came from an MH-60 Seahawk helicopter, said Cmdr. Joshua Frey, a spokesman for the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet. Such helicopters carry FLIR cameras. FLIR, or “forward-looking infrared” cameras, which record heat signatures in black and white. In a statement released Saturday, a spokesman for U.S. Central Command said a U.S. drone had been observing the Front Altair as it was on fire. Several minutes later, Iranian Revolutionary Guard troops fired a modified Iranian SA-7 surface-to-air missile to try to bring down the drone in a likely attempt to disrupt the drone’s surveillance of the Kokuka Courageous, Lt . Col. Earl Brown said. Iran did not immediately acknowledge the incident. Tensions in the Persian Gulf have risen as Iran appears poised to break the nuclear deal, which Trump withdrew America from last year. In the deal, Tehran agreed to limit its enrichment of uranium in exchange for the lifting of crippling sanctions. Now, Iran is threatening to resume enriching uranium closer to weapons-grade levels if European nations don’t offer it new terms to the deal by July 7. Already, Iran says it quadrupled its production of low-enriched uranium. Meanwhile, U.S. sanctions have cut off opportunities for Iran to trade its excess uranium and heavy water abroad, putting Tehran on course to violate terms of the nuclear deal regardless. In May, the U.S. rushed an aircraft carrier strike group and other military assets to the region in response to what it said were threats from Iran. Regardless of who is responsible, the price of a barrel of benchmark Brent crude spiked as much as 4% immediately after the attack Thursday, showing how critical the region remains to the global economy. The Saudi Energy Ministry quoted Minister Khalid al-Falih on Saturday as saying “a rapid and decisive response” was needed to the recent attacks. Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan, the UAE’s Foreign Minister, also called the May attacks against the four oil tankers off Fujairah as “state-sponsored.” He declined to name who the UAE suspected of carrying out the attacks. ___ Associated Press writer Menelaos Hadjicostis in Nicosia, Cyprus, contributed to this report. \t\t\t\t Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.'

Crew members of targeted Norwegian-owned tanker now in Dubai

Construction The Columbian

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Crew members from a Norwegian-owned oil tanker apparently attacked in the Gulf of Oman landed Saturday in Dubai after two days in Iran as the other tanker targeted in the assault limped into anchorage off the eastern
'DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Crew members from a Norwegian-owned oil tanker apparently attacked in the Gulf of Oman landed Saturday in Dubai after two days in Iran as the other tanker targeted in the assault limped into anchorage off the eastern coast of the United Arab Emirates. Both the mariners’ recollection and the physical evidence remaining on the MT Front Altair and the Kokuka Courageous, now off the coast of Fujairah, will play an important role in determining who the international community blames for Thursday’s explosions on board the oil tankers. Already, the U.S. has blamed Iran for what it described as an attack with limpet mines on the two tankers, pointing to black-and-white footage it captured that American officials describe as Iranian Revolutionary Guard troops removing an unexploded mine from the Kokuka Courageous. Tehran rejects the allegation, instead accusing the U.S. under President Donald Trump of pursuing an “Iranophobic” campaign against it. However, Iran previously used mines against oil tankers in 1987 and 1988 in the “Tanker War,” which saw the U.S. Navy escort ships through the region — something American officials may consider doing again. All this comes after four other oil tankers off Fujairah suffered similar attacks in recent weeks, and Iranian-allied rebels from Yemen have struck U.S. ally Saudi Arabia with drones and missiles. President Donald Trump withdrew America last year from the 2015 nuclear deal that Iran reached with world powers and recently imposed a series of sanctions now squeezing its beleaguered economy and cutting deeply into its oil exports. While Iran maintains it has nothing to do with the recent attacks, its leaders repeatedly have threatened to close the vital Strait of Hormuz, through which 20 percent of the world’s oil flows. On Saturday, Associated Press journalists saw the crew members of Front Altair after their Iran Air flight from Bandar Abbas, Iran, landed at Dubai International Airport. Ten of its 23 mariners walked out to be greeted by officials who earlier could be heard saying the others would be catching connecting flights. The officials repeatedly refused to identify themselves to journalists. They and the mariners declined to take questions. The Front Altair caught fire after the attack Thursday, sending a thick cloud of black smoke visible even by satellite from space. A passing ship rescued the mariners, who later were turned over to Iranian officials. Iran took the mariners to Jask, then later Bandar Abbas before putting them on the flight Saturday night. Its crew was comprised of 11 Russians, 11 Filipinos and one Georgian. Meanwhile on Saturday, the Kokuka Courageous arrived off the coast of Fujairah. Journalists in the city could not reach the vessel, as boat captains said authorities instructed them not to go near the stricken vessel. The Kokuka Courageous is the vessel where Iranian Revolutionary Guard troops were filmed Thursday removing something from the ship’s hull. The U.S. military says they removed an unexploded limpet mine, which can be magnetically attached to a vessel. The implication is that Iran wanted to remove any evidence that could link them to the attack. Weapons experts can examine a mine for clues about its manufacturer. The black-and-white video shared Friday by the U.S. military’s Central Command came from an MH-60 Seahawk helicopter, said Cmdr. Joshua Frey, a spokesman for the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet. Such helicopters carry FLIR cameras. FLIR, or “forward-looking infrared” cameras, which record heat signatures in black and white. Tensions in the Persian Gulf have risen as Iran appears poised to break the nuclear deal, which Trump withdrew America from last year. In the deal, Tehran agreed to limit its enrichment of uranium in exchange for the lifting of crippling sanctions. Now, Iran is threatening to resume enriching uranium closer to weapons-grade levels if European nations don’t offer it new terms to the deal by July 7. Already, Iran says it quadrupled its production of low-enriched uranium. Meanwhile, U.S. sanctions have cut off opportunities for Iran to trade its excess uranium and heavy water abroad, putting Tehran on course to violate terms of the nuclear deal regardless. In May, the U.S. rushed an aircraft carrier strike group and other military assets to the region in response to what it said were threats from Iran. Regardless of who is responsible, the price of a barrel of benchmark Brent crude spiked as much as 4% immediately after the attack Thursday, showing how critical the region remains to the global economy. The Saudi Energy Ministry quoted Minister Khalid al-Falih on Saturday as saying “a rapid and decisive response” was needed to the recent attacks. Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan, the UAE’s Foreign Minister, also called the May attacks against the four oil tankers off Fujairah as “state-sponsored.” He declined to name who the UAE suspected of carrying out the attacks. Associated Press writer Menelaos Hadjicostis in Nicosia, Cyprus, contributed to this report.'

Tankers struck near Strait of Hormuz; US blames Iran

Construction USA New Updates

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The U.S. blamed Iran for suspected attacks on two oil tankers Thursday near the strategic Strait of Hormuz, denouncing what it called a campaign of “escalating tensions” in a region crucial to global energy
'DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The U.S. blamed Iran for suspected attacks on two oil tankers Thursday near the strategic Strait of Hormuz, denouncing what it called a campaign of “escalating tensions” in a region crucial to global energy supplies.The U.S. Navy rushed to assist the stricken vessels in the Gulf of Oman off the coast of Iran, including one that was set ablaze. The ships’ operators offered no immediate explanation on who or what caused the damage against the Norwegian-owned MT Front Altair and the Japanese-owned Kokuka Courageous. Each was loaded with petroleum products, and the Front Altair burned for hours, sending up a column of thick, black smoke.U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the U.S. assessment of Iran’s involvement was based in part on intelligence, as well as the expertise needed for the operation. It was also based on recent incidents in the region that the U.S. also blamed on Iran, including the use of limpet mines — designed to be attached magnetically to a ship’s hull — to attack four oil tankers off the nearby Emirati port of Fujairah and the bombing of an oil pipeline in Saudi Arabia by Iranian-backed fighters in May, he said.”Taken as a whole, these unprovoked attacks present a clear threat to international peace and security, a blatant assault on the freedom of navigation and an unacceptable campaign of escalating tension by Iran,” Pompeo said. He provided no evidence, gave no specifics about any plans and took no questions.At the United Nations, the United States asked for closed Security Council consultations on the tanker incidents later Thursday.Iran’s U.N. Mission said the government “categorically rejects” the U.S. claim that it was responsible for the attacks and condemned it “in the strongest possible terms.”A statement from the mission issued Thursday evening said Iran “stands ready to play an active and constructive role in ensuring the security of strategic maritime passages.” It warned of “U.S. coercion, intimidation and malign behavior” and expressed concern “over suspicious incidents” involving the two tankers on Thursday.Iran denied being involved in the attacks last month and its foreign minister questioned the timing of Thursday’s incidents, given that Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was meeting Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei in Tehran.Pompeo noted that Abe had asked Iran to enter into talks with Washington but Tehran “rejected” the overture.”The supreme leader’s government then insulted Japan by attacking a Japanese-owned oil tanker just outside Iranian waters, threatening the lives of the entire crew, creating a maritime emergency,” Pompeo added.Iran previously used mines against oil tankers in 1987 and 1988 in the “Tanker War,” which saw the U.S. Navy escort ships through the region. Regardless of who is responsible, the price of a barrel of benchmark Brent crude spiked as much as 4% immediately after the attack, showing how critical the region remains to the global economy.”The shipping industry views this as an escalation of the situation, and we are just about as close to a conflict without there being an actual armed conflict, so the tensions are very high,” said Jakob P. Larsen, head of maritime security for BIMCO, the largest international association representing ship owners.The suspected attacks occurred at dawn Thursday about 40 kilometers (25 miles) off the southern coast of Iran. The Front Altair, loaded with the flammable hydrocarbon mixture naphtha from the United Arab Emirates, radioed for help as it caught fire. A short time later, the Kokuka Courageous, loaded with methanol from Saudi Arabia and Qatar, also called for help.The U.S. Navy sent a destroyer, the USS Bainbridge, to assist, said Cmdr. Joshua Frey, a 5th Fleet spokesman. He described the ships as being hit in a “reported attack,” without elaborating.In Washington, senior U.S. officials said the U.S. had photographed an unexploded mine on the side of one of the tankers. The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the sensitive matter, said the U.S. will reevaluate its presence in the region and is considering a plan to provide military escorts for merchant ships.Frontline, the firm that operates the Front Altair, told The Associated Press that an explosion was the cause of the fire. Its crew of 23 — from Russia, the Philippines and Georgia — was safely evacuated to the nearby Hyundai Dubai vessel, it said.BSM Ship Management said the Kokuka Courageous sustained hull damage and its 21 Filipino sailors had been evacuated, with one suffering minor injuries. All 21 were placed aboard the Bainbridge, according to Lt. Col. Earl Brown, a spokesman for the U.S. Central Command.Earlier, Iranian state television said 44 sailors from the two tankers were transferred to an Iranian port in the southern province of Hormozgan. The discrepancy could not be immediately reconciled.The Front Altair had been bound for Taiwan, the Kokuka Courageous for Singapore, according to the data firm Refinitiv.According to a U.S. official, initial evidence suggested the attack against the Kokuka Courageous was conducted by Iran with a mine similar to what was used against oil tankers off the UAE last month. The official, who declined to provide additional details or evidence, spoke on condition of anonymity in order to discuss initial findings that have not been made public.Like in Fujairah, dozens of ships ranging from massive oil tankers to smaller pleasure boats, traditional dhows and cargo vessels ply the waters of the strait and the Gulf of Oman. The navies of Iran, Oman, the UAE and the U.S. regularly patrol, but the waters are vast and lit only by the moonlight at night, allowing small vessels to approach without warning.Tensions have escalated in the Mideast as Iran appears poised to break the 2015 nuclear deal with world powers, an accord that President Donald Trump repudiated last year. The deal saw Tehran agree to limit its enrichment of uranium in exchange for the lifting of crippling sanctions. Now, Iran is threatening to resume enriching uranium closer to weapons-grade levels if European nations don’t offer it new terms to the deal by July 7.Already, Iran says it quadrupled its production of low-enriched uranium. Meanwhile, U.S. sanctions have cut off opportunities for Iran to trade its excess uranium and heavy water abroad, putting Tehran on course to violate terms of the nuclear deal regardless.In May, the U.S. rushed an aircraft carrier strike group and other military assets to the region in response to what it said were threats from Iran.As tensions have risen, so have calls from some members of Congress warning the U.S. administration that they do not have the authority to go to war with Iran under the authorization passed after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.But Pompeo sees it differently, according to U.S. Reps. Elissa Slotkin, a Democrat, and Matt Gaetz, a Republican, who said Thursday they have heard the secretary of state argue in briefings that the administration can authorize war on Iran.For nearly two decades the 2001 authorization has been stretched to justify combat with Islamist militants in the Middle East and beyond, mostly recently the Obama administration used it during the fight against the Islamic State.___Associated Press writers Aya Batrawy in Dubai, David Rising in Berlin, Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo, Lolita C. Baldor, Zeke Miller and Susannah George in Washington and Amir Vahdat in Tehran, Iran, contributed.'

Transportation: Trains Will Roll Faster Through Downtown

Construction urbanmilwaukee.com

Signal upgrades are part of effort to expand Amtrak Hiawatha Service
'An Amtrak Hiawatha Service train crosses N. Plankinton Ave. near the Milwaukee Intermodal Station. Photo by Jeramey Jannene. As anyone who has ever been stuck waiting for a train to cross N. Plankinton Ave. or N. 13th St. can tell you, freight trains roll slowly through downtown Milwaukee and the Milwaukee Intermodal Station. The corridor, owned by Canadian Pacific , is used by 16 passenger trains and approximately 20 freight trains daily. A $2.7 million federal grant aims to boost speeds by providing for the installation of a $5.4 million centralized train control system on approximately two miles of track surrounding the Milwaukee Intermodal Station. The system would allow for automatic and remote-controlled track switching. It’s one piece of a bigger puzzle to expand Amtrak Hiawatha Service from seven to 10 daily round trips. \t\t\t The award is part of a $326 million grant announced by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). The grants come from the annual Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvement (CRISI) program created in 2015 . The grant comes on the heels of a recent $5 million award from the FRA that will support the construction of a $10.1 million second platform at the Milwaukee Airport Rail Station. Currently south and northbound trains use the same platform, causing congestion for both passenger and freight trains. “The project will also improve safety and access for passengers with disabilities by eliminating the use of an emergency platform,” said the FRA in a February 2019 press release. Both grants support a $195 million plan to expand daily Amtrak Hiawatha Service between Milwaukee and Chicago. The Wisconsin Legislature’s Joint Committee on Finance allocated $35 million earlier this week to fund the state’s matching share to access the grants. Plenty of work remains to be done. The biggest project on the Wisconsin side of the line, the Muskego Yard bypass, is estimated to cost between $24 million and $60 million. The bypass would route freight trains away from the downtown Milwaukee train station and involve signal, bridge and track upgrades. The biggest challenge remains in Illinois. The Illinois Department of Transportation is refusing to back an environmental assessment of the Hiawatha’s expansion based on the objections of the suburban communities of Glenview and Lake Forest . Illinois and Wisconsin officials are examing options for an alternative route. The route posted record ridership in 2018 , doubling since 2003. New Passenger Cars Good news is on the way even if the service expansion never happens. A late 2018 state report notes that riders of one of the two Hiawatha trainsets can expect to ride in new cars. Eighty-eight single-level coaches from Siemens are in production for use on Midwest Amtrak routes and will enter service in the next three years. One set of the Amfleet passenger cars in use on the Hiawatha, which first entered service in 1981, will be replaced as part of the multi-state order. Faster and more fuel-efficient locomotives entered service in 2017 . A new, $22 million concourse at Milwaukee Intermodal Station opened in 2016. Made-in-Milwaukee trainsets from Talgo , which the state paid for but never put into service and now doesn’t own, remain in storage in Indiana. Former Governor Scott Walker and the Republican-led Legislature rejected a funding plan to put the trainsets into service following an earlier rejection of an $810 million federal grant that would have expanded the Hiawatha Service to Madison. Many of the projects the state is seeking funding for today would have been paid for as part of the grant. A separate proposal to add a second Amtrak Empire Builder train between Minneapolis-St. Paul and Milwaukee is undergoing environmental engineering. Railroad related infrastructure costs for that project are estimated to range from $55 million to $76 million according to a state report. If you think stories like this are important, become a member of Urban Milwaukee and help support real independent journalism. Plus you get some cool added benefits, all detailed  here .'

Southwest Delays Return Of Boeing 737 Max Jets To September

Construction CBS Dallas / Fort Worth

Southwest Airlines has delayed the return of the Boeing 737 Max by a month, which is leading to hundreds of flights being canceled.
'DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM/AP) — Southwest Airlines has delayed the return of the Boeing 737 Max by a month, which is leading to hundreds of flights being canceled. The jets remain grounded after two deadly crashes. Southwest, which has 34 Max jets, said Thursday that it removed the plane from its schedule for an additional month, through Sept. 2. That’s causing Southwest to cancel about 100 flights a day. The airline says it is waiting for more information from Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration about changes to flight software and pilot training. Southwest says it’s still confident the plane will be safe once the FAA approves Boeing’s changes. The flight software was triggered by faulty sensor readings before crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia that killed 346 people. Pilots failed to overcome automatic nose-down commands from the plane. The investigations are continuing. (© Copyright 2019 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)'

Christensen Shipyards rolls last finished yacht out of Vancouver facility

Construction The Columbian

Employees at Vancouver’s Christensen Shipyards marked the end of an era on Wednesday when they rolled the last yacht out of the company’s manufacturing bay in the Columbia Business Park and down the road to the nearby marina for launch.
'Employees at Vancouver’s Christensen Shipyards marked the end of an era on Wednesday when they rolled the last yacht out of the company’s manufacturing bay in the Columbia Business Park and down the road to the nearby marina for launch. The luxury yacht-building company was founded in 1985 by Dave Christensen and has operated out of the Vancouver facility for the past 34 years, but current owner Henry Luken plans to move operations to a bigger shipyard in Tellico Lake, Tenn. The Vancouver facility is slated to become a shipbuilding center for Portland-based company Vigor, which will use the site to manufacture a new type of landing vehicle for the U.S. army. Vigor announced the deal in February, and both companies said the transition would take place in late spring, giving Christensen a few months to finish up work on two yacht hulls under construction at the Vancouver site and get them into the water. In principle, the process of launching a yacht is much like launching any other boat — the vessel is mounted on a trailer, pulled by a truck and backed down a ramp into the water. The key difference is that the Christensen yacht launching this week is five stories tall and weighs 740,000 pounds, mounted on a custom trailer frame that weighs another 135,000 pounds. It’s a slow and careful four-day operation. “At this stage of the game, you don’t take a chance,” said Christensen Shipyards production manager Allen Bell, who was among the staff assisting in the operation. Preparations began earlier this week while the yacht was still in the warehouse, Bell said. First the vessel — which bears the name Jackpot — was lifted by interior cranes so the trailer frame could slide underneath, then it was lowered into place and balanced with blocks along the edge of the trailer frame. The move began at 3:30 a.m. Wednesday in order to minimize traffic disruption. The 30-foot-wide trailer takes up the entire width of Marine Park Way, and even though the distance to the marina is less than half a mile, the journey takes about five hours. At every turn or bump in the road, the rig has to stop so various sets of wheels under the trailer can be lifted or adjusted to compensate and keep the Jackpot perfectly level. With a vessel this size, any amount of tipping is bad news, Bell said. The process is a collaboration between Christensen staff and moving contractor Omega Morgan. The trailer is pulled by an Omega Morgan truck designed specifically for slow and super heavy loads — it’s so low-gear that it’s usually towed to job sites rather than driven, Bell said. The truck bed is stacked with a full load of giant concrete blocks, which push down on the tires to increase their surface area in contact with the road for better traction. A second truck is added when the trailer starts down the ramp, Bell said, to counteract the boat’s enormous weight on the downhill slope. Only about six Christensen staffers were on the ground helping Omega Morgan with the move, Bell said, but dozens of others worked on the logistics behind the scenes to make sure it all went smoothly. The yacht represents more than 300,000 work hours, he said, so everyone wants to be involved. “The whole company launches it,” Bell said. “It’s always been like that. It’s special to everybody up there.” The crew pulled the Jackpot past the ramp entrance at about 9 a.m. Wednesday and then backed it up to the edge, Bell said. They spent most of the day outfitting the rear of the trailer with a pair of “floats” — giant boxy structures that will enter the water first when the yacht is backed down the ramp, giving the entire assembly more buoyancy. The floats are essential for summer launches when the Columbia River level is lower, Bell said. Without them, the trailer would run out of ramp before the stern of the boat could get deep enough into the water to float on its own. The actual launch will take place on Friday or Saturday, Bell said, whenever the water level ends up being highest. Once the Jackpot is far enough out to float on its own, the crews will flood the interior of floats to make them sink. Then they’ll move the Jackpot out of the way and haul the trailer back up the ramp. The yacht will remain in the marina while Christensen staff bring all of its hardware online, Bell said. Then it’ll be put through a series of tests on the Columbia River, followed by a two-day “endurance run” out in the Pacific Ocean before it’s finally delivered to the customer. The Jackpot will be the last yacht to be fully assembled at the Vancouver shipyard. It’s also one of the largest the facility has ever produced; 165 feet long, 30 feet wide with a fuel capacity of 15,000 gallons, and equipped with an enormous array of features and systems — even an onboard sewage treatment plant. “This boat’s a small city in and of itself,” Bell says. One more unfinished yacht hull remains in the Vancouver assembly bay, but it’s been sold to an undisclosed buyer who will complete the construction process. The hull will be moved to the ramp and launched next week, according to Christensen staff, then either barged or towed by tugboat to its new home.'

Metro Transit’s Installation Of Protective Bus Doors Well Underway

Construction WCCO | CBS Minnesota

Mechanics will have to retrofit an average of eight buses per week.
'MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — It was a big concern among Metro Transit bus operators during the most recent contract negotiations, concerns that were validated after a series of driver assaults were caught on camera and posted on social media. It’s tough to forget the April 2018 attack of a Route 5 Metro Transit operator. He was dragged from his seat and punched and kicked on the floor. “These are moms, dads, spouses. They want to come in and do their jobs and go home safely,” Metro Transit spokesman Howie Padilla said. Amalgated Transit Union members demanded better driver protections. Management agreed and the two sides settled on a plan to enhance driver safety. Now, mechanics are busy retrofitting 150 buses with the barrier of choice, the Bentech Plexiglas door. “It took time in order to get the process of figuring out which one we’d go with. It’s taking some time to install them. Once that’s all done I know we’ll be in a better spot,” Padilla said. But to get to that better spot, mechanics will have to retrofit an average of eight buses per week. Padilla says operators will have the option of allowing the door to be opened or closed. “It’s still early in the evaluation process, but what we’ve been able to tell we do believe there are certain to be cases where this is going to make a difference,” Padilla said. That promises to save vulnerable drivers from serious injury. In August a joint committee will review driver feedback. It’s expected the first 150 barriers will be installed on buses by the end of the year. Funding has been secured for an optional 450 additional barriers. If all are purchased it would cover about three-quarters of Metro Transit’s fleet.'

Jackknifed Tractor-Trailer On I-95 In New Castle Backing Up Traffic For Miles

Construction CBS Philly

Police say the tractor-trailer jackknifed into a guardrail in the southbound lanes of I-95.
'NEW CASTLE, Del. (CBS) — A jackknifed tractor-trailer on I-95 in New Castle has backed up traffic for miles. The accident happened on I-95 southbound, just south of Route 141, around 3:30 p.m. (credit: CBS3) Police say the tractor-trailer jackknifed into a guardrail in the southbound lanes of I-95. (credit: CBS3) Currently, only the far left two lanes are getting by. There is no word on any injuries.'

The MTA has another serial subway saboteur on its hands

Construction New York Post

The Big Apple’s latest subway saboteur is a litterbug who’s scattered random items  — including Christmas lights, concrete mix and a fire extinguisher — on Brooklyn subway tracks at least  four times over the course of a month, police said. The
'The Big Apple’s latest subway saboteur is a litterbug who’s scattered random items  — including Christmas lights, concrete mix and a fire extinguisher — on Brooklyn subway tracks at least  four times over the course of a month, police said. The messy menace first struck inside the Atlantic Avenue-Barclays Center station around 12:30 a.m. May..'