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2 injured in Alhambra crash that may be linked to LA shooting

Public Protection Los Angeles Daily News

Officers responded to a call of a major traffic crash at Valley Boulevard and Cabrillo Avenue about 2 a.m. and located a white SUV on the sidewalk with significant front-end damage.
'ALHAMBRA — One person was freed from the wreckage of a single-vehicle crash in Alhambra Tuesday morning that may be related to a shooting that had occurred in Los Angeles. Officers responded to a call of a major traffic crash at Valley Boulevard and Cabrillo Avenue about 2 a.m. and located a white SUV on the sidewalk with significant front-end damage, according to the Alhambra Police Department. A Los Angeles Police Department airship assisted officers on the ground as they quickly set up a perimeter but later determined that all occupants of the SUV were detained at the scene, the LAPD said. Alhambra firefighters needed about an hour to free the injured passenger from the vehicle, police said. Related Articles \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\t1 killed in crash on 101 Freeway in the Hollywood Hills\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tCoroner identifies pedestrian killed on 5 Freeway in Pacoima as LA woman, 31\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tPorter Ranch pursuit ends with 2 deaths in Northridge crash\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tWoman charged in hit-and-run that killed 91-year-old Holocaust survivor in Valley Village was living in her car, arrested on battery warrant\t\t \t\t\t \t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tCar speeding down Balboa Boulevard in Northridge crashes into tire store, 2 other vehicles involved\t\t \t\t\t \t Both the driver and passenger were taken to a hospital with unknown injuries. Details of the shooting were not immediately released. Eastbound Valley Boulevard was shut down at Westmont Drive until further notice.'

California’s Wildfires Are 500 Percent Larger Due to Climate Change

Public Protection theatlantic.com

“Each degree of warming causes way more fire than the previous degree of warming did. And that’s a really big deal.”
'On a hot July evening last year, a rancher tried to use a hammer and stake to plug a wasp’s nest. The hammer slipped, a spark flew, and a patch of dry grass ignited, according to the Los Angeles Times . Within minutes, the brush fire fed on bone-dry conditions and became too big to control. It soon merged with another blaze and became the Mendocino Complex Fire, the largest wildfire in California’s history. It burned almost half a million acres, or roughly 720 square miles, before it was finally extinguished four months later. It killed one firefighter and injured four. Californians may feel like they’re enduring an epidemic of fire. The last decade has seen half of the state’s 10 largest wildfires and seven of its 10 most destructive fires, including last year’s Camp Fire, the state’s deadliest wildfire ever. A new study, published this week in the journal Earth’s Future, finds that the state’s fire outbreak is real —and that it’s driven by climate change. Since 1972, California’s annual burned area has increased more than fivefold, a trend clearly attributable to the warming climate, according to the paper. The trend is dominated by fires like Mendocino Complex—huge blazes that start in the summer and feed mostly on timberland. Over the last five decades , these summertime forest fires have increased by roughly 800 percent in size. This effect is so large that it is driving the state’s overall increase in burned area. [ Read: The simple reason that humans can’t control wildfires ] Why are summertime forest fires so much more likely? Because climate change has already redefined the seasons in northern California. Since the early 1970s, summers in northern California have warmed by about 2.5 degrees Fahrenheit (1.8 degrees Celsius) on average. A few degrees may not sound like much, but heat has an exponential relationship with forest fire. “Each degree of warming causes way more fire than the previous degree of warming did. And that’s a really big deal,” Park Williams, a climate scientist at Columbia and an author of the paper, told me. Every additional increment of heat in the environment speeds up evaporation, dries out the soil, and parches trees and vegetation, turning them into ready fuel for a blaze. For that reason, he said, hot summers essentially overpower anything else happening in northern California. Even during a wet year, an intense heat wave can so choke forests that it is as though the rain never fell. And it matters that heat is prompting this 800-percent explosion in forest fire—because, among the many ways that climate change might be messing with the environment, extra heat is among the simplest and most obvious. “Heat is the most clear result of human-caused climate change,” Williams said. In other words, the climate models say that northern Californian summers should be getting hotter as climate change takes hold. And that’s exactly what the data show—and exactly what’s driving an unprecedented outbreak of forest fire. But this outbreak of climate-addled fire is limited to summertime fires in forests: it does not extend to other types of environment or other times of the year, the paper cautions. Williams and his colleagues found that the amount of burned non-forest area—like southern California’s shrub and grassland—has not significantly increased. [ Read: What it’s like to get caught in a wildfire ] And while autumn wildfires like the the deadly Camp Fire dominate the news—and while there is some evidence they may be getting larger—there is still not enough data to say that that any increase is statistically significant. But the climate models do suggest that autumn fires across California will get more common as climate change continues to wrack the state. “Revisit this in 20 more years, and we’ll almost definitely be saying, yeah, fall fires have the global-warming fingerprint on them . But right now, we’re still emerging from the range of natural variability,” Williams said. Don Hankins , a professor of geography at UC Chico, told me that he wanted to see more data before he could agree with the paper’s results. And he said that some large-scale changes to the landscape—such as the suspension of seasonal burns by indigenous people—may be producing the rise in fires. Williams agrees that climate change is not the only potential driver of increased fire in the state. Over the past century, Americans have gotten better at suppressing fires, meaning that easily burnable fuels may be accumulating in the state’s forests. But he said that even if fires are burning through that excess fuel the effects of climate change are much clearer in this study, during this time frame. That’s because the fundamental relationship between excess heat and additional fire never changes in the study’s data; the correlation is “just as strong for the last 20 years as for the first 20 years,” he said. That suggests that across the five decades, the forests are remaining the same. It’s only the air temperature that has changed. There may be a day when the forests do change. Williams recently asked some of his students to simulate the survival of the state’s forests forward to the end of this century under a worst-case carbon-pollution scenario . They couldn’t do it. “It’s basically impossible,” he said. The state gets so hot that, “in the 2070s, you have individual years where a quarter to a half of all the forest area in California is burning.” But that couldn’t happen: By then, there will be no more forest left to burn. Fires will have finished clearing all of California’s woods. The once mighty Californian forest will give way to scrub, grassland, and desert—types of ecosystem that can rebound quickly after a wildfire or that never burn at all. It’s not a foregone conclusion that all of California’s timberlands will vanish, Williams said. It depends on how we reduce carbon pollution now and in the years to come. The future of the state’s forest, it seems, is up to us.'

SEPTA Driver Injured When Bus, Car Collide In Delaware County, Officials Say

Public Protection CBS Philly

SEPTA says the Route 113 bus was involved in an accident with a car near West Macdad Boulevard and Bullens Lane around 5:45 a.m. on Tuesday.
'RIDLEY TOWNSHIP, Pa. (CBS) – A SEPTA bus driver was injured after the bus and car collided in Delaware County, officials say. SEPTA says the Route 113 bus was involved in an accident with a car near West Macdade Boulevard and Bullens Lane around 5:45 a.m. on Tuesday. The only reported injury is the driver. SEPTA is unsure how many passengers are on the bus at this time. An investigation is ongoing. Stay with CBSPhilly.com for updates to this developing story.'

Feds Expected To Announce Whether Officer Will Face Charges In Eric Garner’s Chokehold Death

Public Protection CBS New York

Tomorrow marks five years since Garner’s death. It’s also the deadline for the U.S. Department of Justice to make its decision.
'NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) –  Federal prosecutors are expected to announce today whether NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo will face charges in the chokehold death of Eric Garner . Tomorrow marks five years since Garner’s death. It’s also the deadline for the U.S. Department of Justice to make its decision. Pantaleo is accused of placing Garner in a chokehold back while attempting to arrest him for selling loose cigarettes back in 2014 on Staten Island. A grand jury declined to indict the officer on criminal charges. Then, former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder launched a federal civil rights investigation, which remains open. Federal authorities have until tomorrow to decide if Pantaleo and others involved in the arrest will face charges. If the feds decide not to proceed, Police Commissioner James O’Neill is expected to decide Pantaleo’s fate with the NYPD. He recently underwent a departmental trial and has been on desk duty since the incident, but he could be fired. Pantaleo has denied using any inappropriate force in trying to subdue Garner. His lawyer, Stuart London, said he’d prefer to remain on the force, saying, “It’s in his blood. He’d love to continue.” An administrative judge who presided over Pantaleo’s internal disciplinary trial in the spring has yet to submit her findings to the police commissioner, who has the final say on punishment, which could range from loss of vacation days to termination. At issue is whether Pantaleo used a chokehold, which is banned by the police department, or another restraint technique, as his lawyer has argued. The department trial, spread over several weeks in May and June, included never-before-heard testimony from other officers involved in Garner’s arrest and a medical examiner, who ruled that the chokehold set into motion “a lethal sequence of events.” Cell phone video shot by Garner’s friend, Ramsey Orta, showed Pantaleo taking Garner to the ground after he and another officer confronted him over suspicions he was selling loose cigarettes. Before Pantaleo grabbed him, Garner is seen on video arguing with the officers, protesting what he considered constant harassment. Pantaleo’s union, the Police Benevolent Association, has blamed Garner’s poor health and resisting arrest for his death. Garner weighed 395 pounds at the time of death and suffered from asthma, diabetes and had a heart nearly double the size of a person in good health, a medical examiner said. Garner’s family will meet with federal prosecutors this morning before holding a news conference. U.S. Attorney Richard Donoghue is also expected to speak around 11 a.m. (© Copyright 2019 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)'

Researchers Fear Asian ‘Clone Tick’ Which Killed US Livestock May Spread Disease to Humans

Public Protection The Epoch Times (US)

An invasive tick species typically found in parts of Asia has been linked to the death of at least five cows in the United States, and now researchers are concerned they could spread diseases to humans. The Asian longhorned tick, which was first
'An invasive tick species typically found in parts of Asia has been linked to the death of at least five cows in the United States, and now researchers are concerned they could spread diseases to humans. The Asian longhorned tick, which was first reported in the United States in Sept. 2017, has drained the blood of five cows in North Carolina, after tick infestations caused acute anemia in the animals, according to North Carolina’s Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) (pdf) , thousands of ticks can be found on an animal at one time. Ticks can carry infectious agents such as bacteria, viruses, or parasites, which can cause illness. Watch #CDCGrandRounds encore session, 7/16 at 1pm ET, to learn about emerging issues related to ticks and tickborne disease. https://t.co/THBrvIHwR2 pic.twitter.com/Vwm6fGY7N8 — CDC (@CDCgov) 12 July 2019 The species is also known as the “clone tick,” as a well-fed female is able to reproduce and lay as many as 2,000 eggs without mating, and its growing population in the United States has alarmed researchers who fear they could spread diseases to humans. The ticks have been found on pets, livestock, wildlife, and people in Arkansas, Connecticut, Kentucky, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia, according to the CDC. The arachnid has even reduced dairy cattle production by 25 percent in New Zealand, according to the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) . While the CDC hasn’t yet found evidence of Asian longhorned ticks spreading disease to people in the United States, researchers remain wary as they say tick bites have made people and animals seriously ill in other countries. Another new tick, and this one can clone itself. Since 2013, the Asian longhorned tick has appeared in 11 US states. Tick-borne diseases are on the rise, reaching a record high in 2017 of more than 59,000 cases. https://t.co/m1ng580297 https://t.co/NrzwWpUQlW pic.twitter.com/5dbAvgX3Z9 — UNL Pesticide Safety (@UNL_PSEP) 12 July 2019 It is “an important vector of human and animal disease agents,” the CDC said in a report published March, adding that in Asia, the species carries a virus that kills 15 percent of people it bites. A May 2019 report published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases lists concerns that the species could spread diseases such as the Powassan virus to humans, reported the New York Post . “The findings of this investigation suggest that public health messages may need to be changed, at least in certain geographic areas, to emphasize a wider range of potential tick habitats,” its authors wrote. First US human bite from worrying longhorned #tick noted https://t.co/4EOCo2yzw1 pic.twitter.com/Ykcz6Nn3Rb — CIDRAP (@CIDRAP) 3 June 2019 Meanwhile, CIDRAP said harmful bacteria such as Borrelia, which can cause Lyme disease, and the bacteria which causes Japanese spotted fever, Rickettsia japonica, can be harbored in humans by the Asian longhorned tick. Its study published in Nov. 2018 found the ticks can also transmit viruses such as Powassan and Heartland to humans, as well as the thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), which causes a human hemorrhagic fever, CIDRAP found. Lead author of the study, Ben Beard, said in a press release for CIDRAP, “The full public health and agricultural impact of this tick discovery and spread is unknown.” “In other parts of the world, the Asian longhorned tick can transmit many types of pathogens common in the United States,” he continued. “We are concerned that this tick, which can cause massive infestations on animals, on people, and in the environment, is spreading in the United States.” “Infectious disease researchers are becoming increasingly alarmed at the murderous Asian Longhorned tick, which has made its way from farm animals to an unsuspecting Yonkers man…” @nypost #asianlonghornedtick https://t.co/rFXs8bHlUi — Global Lyme Alliance (@LymeAlliance) 15 July 2019 Last year, a 66-year-old man was bitten by an Asian longhorned tick while doing yard work, reported the New York Post. He brought the insect to be inspected by health officials out of fear he would catch Lyme disease, but was found to be disease free. The CDC advises people to inspect clothing after spending time outdoors, and to remove the Asian longhorned tick as quickly as possible.'

Florida woman shot in Escalade, left on side of road

Public Protection New York Post

POMPANO BEACH, Fla. — Authorities say a young Florida woman was shot repeatedly and then jumped or was pushed out of a vehicle and left for dead. Broward Sheriff’s officials say 30-year-old Cassandra Fair was riding in a Cadillac Escalade in Pompano
'POMPANO BEACH, Fla. — Authorities say a young Florida woman was shot repeatedly and then jumped or was pushed out of a vehicle and left for dead. Broward Sheriff’s officials say 30-year-old Cassandra Fair was riding in a Cadillac Escalade in Pompano Beach on Friday when someone repeatedly shot her. Detectives say Fair either jumped..'