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Philadelphia Weather: Delaware Valley Could See Temperatures Reach 100 Degrees As Dangerous Heat On The Way

Weather CBS Philly

An excessive heat warning is in effect for Philadelphia and all surrounding suburbs for five days, from 8 a.m. Wednesday until 10 p.m. Sunday.
'PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The Delaware Valley needs to prepare for a long-duration dangerous heat event that will extend through the upcoming weekend. An excessive heat warning is in effect for Philadelphia and all surrounding suburbs for five days, from 8 a.m. Wednesday until 10 p.m. Sunday. (credit: CBS3) A heat advisory is in effect for inland sections of coastal New Jersey, central Delaware, and our far north and west suburbs beginning Wednesday at 11 a.m. and lasting until 8 p.m., so watch for this to potentially be extended and/or upgraded. Temperatures in the 90s and high humidity levels through this multi-day time frame will yield heat indices in the triple digits. (credit: CBS3) On Wednesday and Thursday, scattered downpours and thunderstorms will aid in some cooling off locally. However, Friday through Sunday is set to stay sunny, hazy and dry during the height of the excessive heat. On Saturday, a forecast high temperature of 100 degrees would be the first 100-degree day in seven years in Philadelphia. Heat index values on this day could reach their highest level, possibly to 115 degrees. (credit: CBS3) Plan for ways to keep yourself and your family members cool during this extended stretch of dangerous heat. Review the symptoms of heat illness, the appropriate responses and note the critical differences between heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Heat is the No. 1 weather killer, taking more lives each year on average than tornadoes and hurricanes combined. (credit: CBS3) Bring pets indoors. Use extra caution on dog walks — if you’re hot, your dog is hot. Avoid contact with their paws and the street as on a 90-degree day, the temperature of asphalt can approach 145 degrees.'

New York Bracing For Heat Wave, Residents Urged To Take Precautions

Weather CBS New York

Officials warn heat stroke and heat exhaustion are real threats.
'HICKSVILLE, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — In anticipation of the first heat wave of the summer, cooling centers are opening in our area, and residents are urged to take precautions as temperatures sour above 90 degrees. Kids are already preparing with water guns, ice cream and water slides, and all week camp counselors will be following medical heat wave procedures, calling campers for a water break every 15-20 minutes. “The combination of heat and humidity can become unbearable and uncomfortable, but it can also be dangerous,” Nassau County executive Laura Curran told CBS2’s Jennifer McLogan. Up the intake of fluids; heat stroke and heat exhaustion are real threats. TIPS TO BEAT THE HEAT: Your Guide To Summer Safety Cars can be especially dangerous. “We know that the elderly, children and babies, and pets can be highly susceptible to extreme levels of heat and humidity like we’re going to experience this weekend,” Dr. Lawrence Eisenstein, Nassau health commissioner, said. Nassau County is opening a multitude of cooling centers. Air conditioning experts say test units now for reliability. With the blazing sun, this week is not the time to set thermostats off while away. “Our recommendation is in the extreme conditions, just let the systems run,” Kerry O’Brien, with O’Brien Cooling Experts, said. If you don’t have air conditioning, find places to go for relief from the heat — schools, libraries, theaters, malls, cooling centers — during the warmest part of the day. Remembers hats and light, loose-fitting clothing. “If you’re having a problem, call a neighbor, call a friend, call 911 if you have to. Heat emergencies are no joke, and I don’t want it to sneak up on anybody,” Steven Morelli, with the Nassau office of emergency management, said. PSEG says it is ready for a power surge as temperatures rise.'

Excessive Heat Watch in effect for Chicago/Cook County Thursday afternoon through Friday into Saturday afternoon

Weather WGN-TV

..Dangerous Heat Potential Later This Week with Excessive Heat Watch in Effect for Chicago.. .A multiple day episode of heat, potentially dangerous, is likely later this week centered on Friday into the start of the weekend. This heat will expand
'..Dangerous Heat Potential Later This Week with Excessive HeatWatch in Effect for Chicago..A multiple day episode of heat, potentially dangerous, is likelylater this week centered on Friday into the start of the weekend.This heat will expand into the area Thursday afternoon andpersist through Friday and into Saturday. There is potential forshowers and thunderstorms Thursday morning that may keep Thursdaycooler than forecast, but confidence is increasing in dangerousheat arriving by Friday as well as Thursday and Friday nightshaving little to no relief. The urban heat island core ofChicago is most susceptible to night time temperatures that do notcool significantly, limiting the amount of relief that can occurat night..EXCESSIVE HEAT WATCH IN EFFECT FROM THURSDAY AFTERNOON THROUGHSATURDAY EVENING..The National Weather Service in Chicago has issued an ExcessiveHeat Watch, which is in effect from Thursday afternoon throughSaturday evening.* HIGH TEMPERATURES..Peaking in the 90s each day, with Friday and Saturday potentially in the upper 90s.* MAXIMUM HEAT INDICES..Peaking 100 to 108 each day.* LOW TEMPERATURES..Lows only around 80 in the city of Chicago on Thursday and Friday nights will offer little to no relief from the heat.* IMPACTS..The cumulative effects of temperatures and heat index values this high could lead to heat related illnesses with prolonged exposure. Those without air conditioning, elderly, small children, and pets are especially susceptible. Plan ahead. Have a cool place to shelter from the heat. Avoid outdoor activity, especially strenuous ones, during the peak heating times of the day.PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS..An Excessive Heat Watch means that a prolonged period of hottemperatures is expected. The combination of hot temperatures andhigh humidity will combine to create a dangerous situation inwhich heat illnesses are possible. Drink plenty of fluids..stayin an air-conditioned room..stay out of the sun..and check upon relatives and neighbors.The extended duration of heat, combined with nearly fullsunshine, and oppressive warmth even at night will lead topotentially hazardous conditions, particularly for the elderly andthose with pre-existing health conditions. Residents of the cityof Chicago can call 3..1..1..to request well being checks forelderly friends or family members, or for information on findingthe nearest cooling center.'

How to Stay Safe During a Heat Wave

Weather Consumer Reports

Extreme heat can be a killer. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 600 people die each year in the U.S. due to extreme heat, often from heatstroke..
'Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site. Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site. Extreme heat can be a killer. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 600 people die each year in the U.S. due to extreme heat, often from heatstroke , which occurs when the body’s temperature reaches 104° F or higher.  But often people don’t realize how dangerous extreme heat can be. “It doesn't come in toppling down trees or damaging homes,” says Michelle Hawkins, Ph.D., chief of the National Weather Service’s Severe, Fire, Public, and Winter Weather Services Branch. “It’s not the type of thing you can see coming at you, but it’s still very deadly and very dangerous.” Average temperatures been rising in recent years—June 2019 was the hottest June ever recorded worldwide—and stretches of abnormal heat seem to be more common these days. A major report from the federal government’s U.S. Global Change Research Program found that heat waves, or six consecutive days of extremely high temperatures, have been increasing in frequency since the 1960s. And they're expected to continue being more frequent and more intense.   The heat can affect anyone, but older adults, young children, and people with chronic illnesses are most at risk for serious problems. Simple precautions can help keep you safe. Here’s what experts say are the most important safety steps to take during extreme heat.  Check the Heat and Humidity There’s no temperature that's considered the threshold for danger. That’s in part because humidity also needs to be considered: The more humid the air, the longer it takes for sweat to evaporate, and it's the evaporation process that helps the body cool down. (In fact, the “heat index,” a term you might hear in a weather report, is a measure of how hot it feels outside when factoring in humidity and temperature.) In addition, people who live in warmer climates are acclimated to higher temperatures than those in colder regions, Hawkins says. So what's considered normal in those areas might be unusually hot in another. To get heat and humidity information and forecasts for your area, check your local news or go to the National Weather Service’s website  and type in your ZIP code.   When you do, you might hear or read about one or more kinds of temperature cautions. A heat advisory signals that a high heat index is forecast for the next one to two days based on your area’s usual climate, and an excessive heat warning means that high heat index will linger for two days or longer, according to Hawkins. (A heat advisory is triggered at a lower heat index than an excessive heat warning.) A heat watch means excessive heat is likely to occur in the area within a few days. Take Steps to Stay Cool If your area is experiencing extreme heat, stay in air-conditioned spaces as much as possible, especially during the warmest parts of the day, typically 10 a.m. to 5 p.m . And don’t underestimate how hot it can get indoors without AC. A 2014 study in the journal Science of the Total Environment of 285 low- and middle-income New York City homes found that heat conditions indoors had the potential to reach hazardous levels—which the researchers defined as a heat index of at least 93° F—during heat waves. That electric fan might not do the trick, either. According to the  New York State Department of Health , at indoor temperatures in the high 90s, fans aren’t effective at cooling. So, if AC at home isn’t an option for you, plan to spend time in air-conditioned public spaces, like a movie theater or library. Find out where cooling centers (air-conditioned spaces open to the public) are in your area. Your local health department can help you find one.  Inside or out, dress in lightweight, light-colored, breathable clothing. Outdoors, consider adding a wide-brimmed hat, and use sunscreen. Sunburn increases your risk of skin cancer and can hinder your body’s ability to cool itself. Also, be sure to take frequent breaks in an air-conditioned space. On sultry days, take it easy on outdoor physical activity, too. Leave major outdoor projects until the heat wave breaks, if you can, and do vigorous activity during the coolest parts of the day. Early morning is best, says Robert McLean, M.D., president of the American College of Physicians, because the heat of the day can be slow to dissipate in the evening.  Stay Well-Hydrated Usually, letting your thirst to tell you when to drink is a good strategy for staying hydrated . But during an extreme heat event, the CDC advises upping your water intake. There’s no recommended amount, but make sure you’re sipping regularly, even if you don’t feel thirsty. (If your doctor has told you to restrict fluid intake for medical reasons, ask how you should stay hydrated during extreme heat.) Water is your best bet for hydrating. Most people don’t need to drink sports drinks, which may contain a lot of added sugars. And avoid dehydrating alcoholic beverages. You can also get water through food, including a variety of fruits and vegetables.  During a heat wave, consider bringing water with you wherever you go, McLean says. That can help you avoid getting stuck in a situation where you’re without it, such as having your car break down on a hot road.  If you notice signs of dehydration , including increased thirst, dry mouth and tongue, restlessness or irritability, decreased urine, or skin slow to move back into place when pinched, drink more fluids right away. If you haven’t urinated in several hours or you're producing very dark urine, contact your doctor. Keep an Eye on Those at Higher Risk Certain groups of people are more prone to heat-related problems. They include older adults and young children, whose bodies aren’t as adept at regulating their temperature, and people with certain chronic medical conditions, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Those who have asthma or COPD might experience more breathing problems in the extreme heat, notes McLean, and should watch the forecast for air-quality advisories along with extreme heat events. Certain medications, including diuretics , can also hike the risk of heat-related illnesses.  If you have older relatives or neighbors, check in on them frequently during a heat wave. And never leave an infant or child alone in a hot car, even for a few minutes. (The same goes for pets .) If you have a child in the backseat, keep a visual reminder of his or her presence in the front seat, such as a diaper bag or jacket. ( Read this for more tips.) Know the Signs of Heat-Related Illness Here's what to look for and what to do: Heat cramps. These painful muscle cramps are often a result of a lot of strenuous activity in the heat . Drinking juice or a sports drink to replenish lost fluid and salt, and resting for a few hours, can help. Heat exhaustion. Signs of heat exhaustion include feeling tired, weak, or dizzy; sweating heavily; nausea and vomiting; and pale skin. If you notice any of these symptoms, stop what you’re doing, rest, hydrate, and try to cool your body down by getting into air conditioning if you can, or taking a cool bath or shower. If left untreated, heat exhaustion can progress to heatstroke, according to the CDC. Heatstroke. This condition, which can be fatal, occurs when your body’s mechanism for cooling itself becomes overwhelmed and your temperature rises to 104° F or higher. Signs include confusion or an altered mental state, nausea, red and hot skin, being unable to sweat, a throbbing headache, and/or fainting. If you suspect that you (or someone else) are suffering from heatstroke, call 911 immediately and begin to try and cool down. Sports teams may keep a tub of ice water on hand for you to submerge parts of your body. Other options include spraying yourself (or someone else) with a garden hose, getting into a cool shower, or sponging down with cool water.  Check out some of the top-rated products that may be useful during a summer heat wave: Consumer Reports is an independent, nonprofit organization that works side by side with consumers to create a fairer, safer, and healthier world. CR does not endorse products or services, and does not accept advertising. Copyright © 2019, Consumer Reports, Inc.'

Men died for that flag and other commentary

Weather New York Post

Conservative: Men Died for That Flag Think twice before you devalue the American flag, chides Rich Lowry at National Review. (Nike execs, ICE protesters, and a certain soccer player come to mind.) “Men have fought for the flag, and not just in the
'Conservative: Men Died for That Flag Think twice before you devalue the American flag, chides Rich Lowry at National Review. (Nike execs, ICE protesters, and a certain soccer player come to mind.) “Men have fought for the flag, and not just in the sense of fighting under it,” he notes, relating stories of “color sergeants”..'

6 Easy Steps to Prevent Your Child From Getting Heatstroke

Weather Fatherly

Your kid is especially susceptible to the heat. Here's how to prevent it.
'Getting hot and sweaty in the summertime is to be expected, but when it happens to kids, it’s not something parents should keep their cool about.Young children are significantly more at risk for developing heatstroke than adults, a condition where their core temperature reaches deadly levels  for a number of physiological and developmental reasons.One reason children are so susceptible to heatstroke is simply a matter of size: The smaller a person is, the faster they overheat.  “Children have a smaller body surface area compared to an adult,” explains Dr.Sashini Seeni, a general practitioner. “Hence, less surface area to regulate their temperature.This also means they have less space to sweat, which means a less effective body-cooling system.” Sweat helps cool the body off by dampening the skin: When the moisture evaporates it takes some heat with it as well, further cooling the body.When people get too hot, the hypothalamus, part of the brain responsible for regulating body temperature, signals the central nervous system to increase blood circulation to stimulate sweating, effectively cooling them off.But for babies and young children, this internal self-cooling system is not fully developed, so not only do they have less room to sweat, but their brains are less likely to tell their bodies when they need to perspire for their own good.Before kids experience heatstroke, they will likely show signs of heat exhaustion, a lesser reaction that can snowball fast if caretakers don’t intervene.Symptoms of heat exhaustion include muscle cramps, pale or cold skin, confusion, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, headaches, rapid heartbeat, dark urine, and excessive sweating.However, if kids stop sweating, or if they’re fainting, having trouble breathing, or having seizures, it could be heatstroke, a medical emergency that requires immediate attention.Heatstroke gets deadly when parents are absent and miss these signs.This is why most heatstroke fatalities happen in the car.In 2018 alone,  52 children   died from heatstroke as a result of being left in a hot car, rather than being overdressed or caught in the sun for too long.  “Having a child overdressed in extremely hot weather, plus physical activity and lack of hydration can cause heatstroke,” says Dr.Nikola Djordjevic, a family physician from MedAlertHelp.org. “But the occurrence of death due to heatstroke is higher in car-related incidents.”  Djordjevic and Seeni agree that the difference between a sweaty kid on a fun summer day and a child with heatstroke is attentive parents.Moms and dads who realize children heat up much faster and recognize when they need water or shade, or are in serious danger of overheating can rest assured that if they’re paying attention, everything will be fine.  “Caregivers should be able to notice the signs of heat exhaustion and provide an adequate response — undressing, cooling, hydration,” Djordjevic recommends. “If treated immediately, a child can recover from heatstroke, but it’s important that there is someone around to notice the signs.” Heatstroke Prevention in 6 Steps Make sure your child is hydrated.This means water breaks at least every quarter-hour.Dress children in breathable, loose-fitting clothing.Don’t leave your child in an exposed car on a hot day, unattended or not.Don’t ever leave your child in a car on their own.If a child experiences  muscle cramps, pale or cold skin, confusion, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, headaches, rapid heartbeat, dark urine, and excessive sweating on a hot day, immediately take them to a cool place and hydrate them.Don’t wait for your kid to tell you they’ve had enough.If the heat is hard on you, assume it’s that much harder for them.Know when to call it a day.Related Articles: Assemble a Killer Nerf Arsenal For Less With These Prime Day Deals This Laser Tag Set for Kids Is 50 Percent Off For Prime Day 6 Easy Steps to Prevent Your Child From Getting Heatstroke 5 Awesome Lego Star Wars Prime Day Deals . The post 6 Easy Steps to Prevent Your Child From Getting Heatstroke appeared first on Fatherly .'

As SoCal Heat Wave Winds Down, Fire Danger Remains in Some Areas

Weather KTLA

The first summer heat wave in Southern California showed signs of breaking Tuesday, with the start of a cooling trend expected Wednesday thanks in part to increased onshore flow. The area’s coastal cities were greeted with dense fog early Tuesday
'The first summer heat wave in Southern California showed signs of breaking Tuesday, with the start of a cooling trend expected Wednesday thanks in part to increased onshore flow. The area’s coastal cities were greeted with dense fog early Tuesday morning as meteorologists warned of suddenly reduced visibility for motorists, boaters and airlines. The low-hanging clouds, which are expected to thin by the afternoon, come with a temperature cooldown in the Los Angeles area after a muggy start to the week complete with high temperatures and poor air quality. Temperatures in central L.A. will dip slightly Tuesday — to 94 degrees — but will fall below average over the next few days. Highs will fall to 87 degrees Wednesday and 82 degrees Thursday, according to the National Weather Service. In the meantime, temperatures will remain above normal in the Valley communities, although not quite as high as they’ve been since Thursday, when the heat wave started. Those temperatures should be 3 to 5 degrees cooler in the coming days, meteorologists said. Read the full story on LATimes.com .'

Half-blood Thunder Moon will be a sight to behold — but there’s a catch

Weather East Bay Times

The half-blood Thunder Moon is a partial lunar eclipse that starts Tuesday at 11:43 a.m. PDT and ends at 5:17 p.m. Unfortunately for those of us in North America, we won't see it.
'When it comes to Tuesday’s half-blood Thunder Moon, North America’s loss is Europe’s, Africa’s, Asia’s, Australia’s, South America’s, the Middle East’s and parts of West India’s gain. Folks in those corners of the world will be treated to a rare and awesome sight with the appearance of the so-called half-blood Thunder Moon, a partial lunar eclipse that starts Tuesday at 11:43 a.m. PDT and ends at 5:17 p.m., according to timeanddate.com. It will reach its peak at 2:30 p.m. Unfortunately for those of us in North America, we won’t be able see it. Here’s what most everyone else on the planet are in for: According to NASA , a half-blood Thunder Moon get its name from being both a partial lunar eclipse, known as a half-blood Moon, as well as July’s Thunder Moon. As NASA puts it, “this will be a partial eclipse of the Moon, with the full shadow of the Earth (called the umbra) falling on about two-thirds of the Moon at the peak of the eclipse.” In other words, only part of the moon will appear dark while the rest of it remains illuminated by the sun. The Thunder Moon, also known as the Hay, Buck or Mead Moon, gets its name because, as the Old Farmer’s Almanac explains, “thunderstorms are so frequent during this month.” The Buck Moon’s name is also rooted in nature, since July is about the time that new antlers start to sprout on a buck’s head. According to the Royal Observatory Greenwich in London, the eclipse will pass over Europe, Africa and other parts of the world as “at maximum, we will only see a little over 60 percent of the surface of the Moon through Earth’s full show and appear red,” according to the observatory’s website. “The other part of the Moon will still appear silvery grey because sunlight is still reflecting off that part of the Moon.”'