{{ 'Go back' | translate}}
Njus logo

Latest news from USA New Updates, | Njus USA

House passes resolution condemning ‘racist’ Trump tweets aimed at group of Democrat congresswomen

Politics USA New Updates

The House voted Tuesday to condemn comments from President Donald Trump that have been criticized as racist, with some Democrats complaining that party leaders aren’t punching back hard enough.The 240-187 vote backed a resolution that “strongly
'The House voted Tuesday to condemn comments from President Donald Trump that have been criticized as racist, with some Democrats complaining that party leaders aren’t punching back hard enough.The 240-187 vote backed a resolution that “strongly condemns President Donald Trump’s racist comments that have legitimized and increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color.” Several Republicans joined Democrats in voting for the measure.As the top House Republican dismissed the planned vote as “all politics,” Trump earlier Tuesday continued his attacks on the four outspoken freshmen Democrats who’ve been the focus of the president’s ire.Before the House vote, though, Speaker Nancy Pelosi was called out by Republicans for violating a House rule that prohibits calling the president a racist or saying his statements were racist. The Democratic-controlled chamber voted 232-190 against striking her remarks from the record, and the speaker told reporters she stood by her statements.\t\tRepublicans voting for the measure were Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania, Fred Upton of Michigan, Will Hurd of Texas and Susan Brooks of Indiana. Independent Justin Amash, until recently a Republican, also backed the resolution. Six Republicans didn’t vote.The president started the controversy on Sunday by tweeting that the four lawmakers, all women of color, should “go back” to the countries they “originally came from,” instead of telling Americans “how our government is to be run.”On Tuesday, Trump said on Twitter, “Those Tweets were NOT Racist. I don’t have a Racist bone in my body! The so-called vote to be taken is a Democrat con game.” Later, at a cabinet meeting, the president said of the four women lawmakers: “It’s my opinion they hate our country.”All four of the women — Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan — are U.S. citizens, and all but Omar were born in the U.S.Ocasio-Cortez, in her own tweet Tuesday, reminded Trump that she was born in his hometown of New York City, and said Trump may not have racist bones, but that he does have “a racist mind” and “a racist heart.”The vote came against a backdrop of the 2020 campaign for the White House and Congress. Trump won election in part by exploiting anti-immigrant sentiments among some voters, and it’s a message he’s stuck to through his first term. Democrats, meanwhile, are seeking to harness the energy of female and minority voters who helped them win control of the House in 2018 and flip local and state offices in key swing states such as Wisconsin and Michigan.Trump has indicated that he regards the controversy as a winner for him. Asked if he was concerned that his tweet was seen as racist and that white nationalists found common cause with him, Trump said no. “It doesn’t concern me because many people agree with me,” he said.Trump on Tuesday also tweeted a thanks to House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy for publicly agreeing that his comments were not racist.“Why isn’t the House voting to rebuke the filthy and hate laced things they have said?” Trump tweeted, referring to the four lawmakers. “Because they are the Radical Left, and the Democrats are afraid to take them on. Sad!”On the Senate side, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters, “The president’s not a racist,” though he refused to comment on Trump’s statements. “Everyone ought to tone down their rhetoric,” said McConnell, who noted that his wife, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, came to the U.S. at age 8 “and didn’t know a word of English.”Pelosi, in a closed-door meeting Tuesday morning with fellow Democrats, urged them to unify behind the condemnation measure and to back the four women, with whom she has had her own recent disagreements. She referred to them as “our sisters,” according to an aide in the room.Some Democrats say Trump’s tweets have benefited Pelosi by unifying the party and helping her move past her own public squabbles with the same four women. “I think the longer that he does things like that, the easier it is for her to bring the caucus together on our main priorities,” said Representative Raja Krishnamoorthi of Illinois. U.S. Representatives Ayanna Pressley (D-MA) speaks as, Ilhan Abdullahi Omar (D-MN)(L), Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) (2R), and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) hold a press conference, to address remarks made by President Donald Trump earlier in the day, on July 15, 2019. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images The resolution, H.Res. 489, admonishes Trump for saying that immigrants and people “who may look to the president like immigrants should ‘go back’ to other countries.”It also criticizes Trump for “saying that members of Congress who are immigrants (or those of our colleagues who are wrongly assumed to be immigrants) do not belong in Congress or in the United States of America.”Some Democrats complained that Pelosi and party leaders — who they said are already pulling their punches by not pursuing impeachment of Trump — were doing so again by not bringing a formal censure resolution to the House floor. They said that would send a stronger message because the House has only rarely taken such action against a sitting president.“The president has crossed a red line in his chaotic commentary,” according to a statement from Democratic Representative Steve Cohen of Tennessee, who introduced a censure measure. “Congress must censure him for this un-American and un-presidential language.”But Democrat Dan Kildee of Michigan said a censure resolution would be less likely to get Republican support. “Where I come from, people want to know whether we are standing up to the president or not,” he said. “And what word we attach to it is probably not that significant.”Although some Republicans in Congress joined in the denunciations of Trump’s original tweets, McCarthy insisted the president’s comments were not racist.“I will vote against this resolution. It’s all politics,” he told reporters, adding that the House should give similar scrutiny to comments by the four women, including their previous criticisms of Pelosi.Louisiana Republican Ralph Abraham said on Twitter: “There’s no question that the members of Congress that @realDonaldTrump called out have absolutely said anti-American and anti-Semitic things. I’ll pay for their tickets out of this country if they just tell me where they’d rather be.”'

Kingston councillor facing charges apologies ‘to anyone who was upset by my actions’

Law and Order USA New Updates

Sydenham Coun. Peter Stroud is expected to appear in court again in August. Elliot Ferguson / Postmedia A Kingston city councillor facing criminal charges issued a statement Tuesday after days of silence.Coun. Peter Stroud of Sydenham District was
'Sydenham Coun. Peter Stroud is expected to appear in court again in August.\t\t\t\t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t\t\tElliot Ferguson / Postmedia\t\t\t\t\t\t \t\t\tA Kingston city councillor facing criminal charges issued a statement Tuesday after days of silence.Coun. Peter Stroud of Sydenham District was charged by Kingston Police with causing a disturbance and obstructing property under $5,000 following an incident on June 23. The charges have not been proven in court. Stroud’s first appearance is scheduled for Aug. 15.When the Kingston Whig-Standard reported the story last Friday, Stroud asked not to be contacted again until the matter was settled in court, but on Tuesday he posted a statement on Twitter.“I did not intend to upset anyone, and I sincerely apologize to anyone who was upset by my actions,” Stroud wrote. “My intention was to gain access for my eldest child, who was refused service while arrived to an express bus stop before the scheduled departure.”Kingston Police alleged in a news release that a man chased after the bus, then placed his child on the roadway in front of the bus, blocked the bus with his bike and started yelling and talking photos of the driver.According to the police, the incident was reported to them on June 24, and Stroud was asked to come in and speak to them the same day. They allege that Stroud initially refused and didn’t turn himself in until July 11.Stroud wrote a different version of events on Twitter.“I turned myself into the police station at their suggestion, was fully co-operative, and was released immediately after being charged,” Stroud said. “I will be facing the charges on the court date with the help of legal counsel.“I cannot comment further at this time (sic) as the case is before the courts (sic) I ask the press not to contact me about this personal matter, but respect my privacy at this time.”scrosier@postmedia.comtwitter.com/StephattheWhig\t\t\t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t\t\t Edit'

Optometrist Pulls Tick Out of Kentucky Man’s Eye After He Complained Something Was Stuck In It

Photo USA New Updates

Ticks are seen in a file photo. (Credit: Getty Images) Ticks are seen in a file photo. (Credit: Getty Images) Kentucky electrical worker Chris Prater douses himself in insect repellent every day to beat the bugs he encounters on the job. But all his
'Ticks are seen in a file photo. (Credit: Getty Images) \t\t\t \t\t\t \t\t\t\t\t\t\tTicks are seen in a file photo. (Credit: Getty Images) \t\tKentucky electrical worker Chris Prater douses himself in insect repellent every day to beat the bugs he encounters on the job. But all his spraying couldn’t spare him from a pernicious tick that found in the one spot he couldn’t swat — his eyeball. “You can’t spray your eyes,” he told CNN affiliate WYMT . The teeny parasite fought its way into Prater’s eye some time during a July tree-cutting job in Johnson County, he explained. Prater didn’t originally think anything of the irritation before the diagnosis. It must’ve been the sawdust that got caught in his eyeball, he thought, and he could easily flush it out later. Flush he did, but the discomfort persisted. Prater begrudgingly saw an optometrist who broke the news — a deer tick had taken up residence in his cornea. Before Prater could wrap his head around it, the physician numbed his eye and plucked the pest out with tweezers. The tick made a “little popping sound” as it was pulled out, he said. The doctor sent him off with antibiotics and a prescription for steroid eye drops. And Prater left with one less living thing sharing his body. Forget why ticks are terrible? Let’s review When it comes to finding new ways to freak people out, the bloodsucking disease-spreading parasite just won’t quit. Prater’s tick-in-the-eye isn’t even the first reported: an eye doctor recounted yanking a live tick out of a man’s eye in a 2011 report from the American Academy of Ophthalmology . And they’re not partial to eyeballs, either. A 9-year-old boy in Connecticut returned from a romp at the playground to find a tick embedded in his ear , feeding on the blood from his eardrum tissue. If it hadn’t been removed, doctors said the tick’s tissue-munching might’ve impaired his hearing. Oh, and researchers recently discovered that a species that has learned to clone itself and is predicted to “soon occupy a large swath of eastern North America.” In short: thank you, ticks, for absolutely nothing.'

Russia blacklists Canada-based Ukrainian World Congress, declaring it ‘undesirable’

Law and Order USA New Updates

OTTAWA — The Canadian president of the Ukrainian World Congress, which represents a diaspora of 20 million Ukrainians worldwide, is decrying a Russian decision last week to blacklist the Toronto-based organization.On Thursday Russia’s prosecutor
'OTTAWA — The Canadian president of the Ukrainian World Congress, which represents a diaspora of 20 million Ukrainians worldwide, is decrying a Russian decision last week to blacklist the Toronto-based organization.On Thursday Russia’s prosecutor general declared the organization “undesirable,” according to a press release, saying its activities threaten Russian national security and violate its constitution. Under Russian law, people who associate with the organization could face financial penalties or jail time.“The thing that’s of greatest concern to us is the attitude that the Russian government is taking towards the large Ukrainian ethnic minority within Russia,” said the congress’s president, Paul Grod, in an interview on Monday. The community of two million is the biggest outside Ukraine and until now was able to maintain networks internationally through the UWC.“The Kremlin is essentially trying to isolate any civil society organizations within Russia, trying to isolate them from the outside world,” he said.\t\tIhor Ichalchyshyn, the CEO of the organization’s Canadian branch, the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, said the “ominous statement” from Russia was “unexpected,” and the full implications may not yet be known. But President Vladimir Putin’s political opponents are already facing persecution. “Our greatest fear is that community groups in Russia will now face even more pressure and repression,” he said.Part of the UWC’s mandate has been to strongly criticize Russia for its actions toward Ukraine, including the annexation of its Crimea region in 2014, which violated international law.In 2014, Grod and then-MP, now-foreign minister Chrystia Freeland were among 13 Canadians sanctioned by Russia and forbidden from entering the country. Grod was elected to the UWC presidency in November and speculated that his presence on the sanctions against him could be connected to the Russian prosecutor’s decision.Meanwhile, Freeland and the Liberal federal government have remained staunch supporters of Ukraine amid its ongoing conflict with Russia-backed separatists in the east of the country. Two weeks ago the third Ukraine Reform Conference was held in Toronto, where Prime Minister Justin Trudeau met Ukraine’s new president Volodymyr Zelensky.A press release out of the conference committed Canada to prevent the recognition of Russian passports issued in the Crimean territory, a move that Grod said shows Canada’s global “leadership role.” In the past five years, Canada has contributed some $785 million in support to Ukraine including towards a military training operation.“Canada will always support the people of Ukraine, Ukraine’s sovereignty, and its territorial integrity. We condemn in the strongest terms Russia’s illegal occupation and annexation of Crimea and its aggression in Eastern Ukraine,” said Adam Austen, a spokesman for Freeland, on Monday. “It is disappointing, but not surprising, that the Russian Federation has chosen to designate the Ukrainian World Congress, the co-ordinating body for Ukrainian communities worldwide, as ‘undesirable.’ Canada will continue to work closely with the UWC and all organizations committed to helping Ukraine.”Grod hesitated to make a connection between Canada’s blunt criticisms of Russia and the blacklisting of an organization whose head office is in Toronto — the UWC is represented in 60 countries with big offices in Brussels, New York and Kiev, and works with a variety of other governments including the United States, United Kingdom and European Union. Ichalchyshyn agreed. “I think it’s more about the international voice that is the UWC,” he said.Asked for comment, Russia’s embassy in Ottawa offered a statement claiming that ”Canada-based Ukrainian World Congress has nothing to do with promoting Ukrainian culture, language and traditions in Russia, which hosts the world’s largest Ukrainian community, but instead (pursues) a highly biased russophobic agenda, threatening Russian territorial integrity and national security,” calling it an “anti-Russia entity” that “glorifies Nazi collaborators” and is trying to “sow hatred.”Meanwhile the idea that the UWC is doing work that could harm Russia’s ambitions seemed to please Ukraine’s foreign ministry, which put out a statement via its Ottawa embassy Friday saying “one cannot but rejoice” at the idea the Kremlin feels threatened. It nonetheless expressed “strong protest” to the prosecutor general’s decision.“From my perspective, on one hand it’s a badge of honour,” said Grod. “On the other hand it’s a demonstration of a very sad state of affairs.”• Email: mdsmith@postmedia.com | Twitter: mariedanielles'

Egan: Bill Luxton was an Ottawa television pioneer

Humor USA New Updates

The weekend brought a sudden and surprising end to the life of Bill Luxton, an Ottawa television pioneer from an era when hosts were smooth-talking men in suits and production was a live, unpredictable, often local affair.Best-known as the first
'The weekend brought a sudden and surprising end to the life of Bill Luxton, an Ottawa television pioneer from an era when hosts were smooth-talking men in suits and production was a live, unpredictable, often local affair.Best-known as the first half of the Willy and Floyd comedy team, Luxton was found lifeless at the bottom of his backyard pool on Brierwood Avenue in Highland Park on Saturday evening. He was 92.“Oh God, it was such a shocker,” said longtime friend Gord Atkinson, 92, once a fixture at CFRA. “We were such great buddies.” A file photo of Bill Luxton, a well-known actor and local television personality, who died suddenly on Saturday. He was 92. File photo Luxton’s son, also named Bill, said the family had a birthday party that afternoon on Brierwood, after which his father decided to have a swim in the backyard — one of his first of the season.When he hadn’t returned in half an hour or so, his wife Toots (born Agnes) called her son and a niece to come and investigate. (She has mobility issues.) His robe and flip-flops were discovered poolside and, within a few moments, he was located at the bottom in his bathing trunks. He could not be revived. A heart attack or other dire physical crisis is suspected.“He had been in excellent health,” said his son Bill, 65, though his father had overcome prostate cancer and had cardiac bypass surgery in 1998. He had an active retirement, doing his own yard work, golfing, acting, travelling, playing pool and singing regularly with the Grey Jazz Big Band.“He was in vibrant health up until the day he died.”Luxton had a long, varied career and worked with generations of television personalities and reporters, including one-time American anchor Peter Jennings and legendary impressionist Rich Little. He did a great deal of voice-over work, was active in local theatre and was deeply involved in the heyday of in-house production at CJOH.Not only did the Willy and Floyd show remain on air for 22 years, but Luxton also somehow had time to host the fondly-remembered Amazing Kreskin and a daily magazine show.“Twelve-hour days were nothing for him,” said his son, youngest of two children. “I don’t think he looked at his work as work. He just loved what he was doing.” A file photo of Bill Luxton, a long-time presence on the Ottawa television scene. Supplied photo Like so many of his generation, war marked his early years. Born in Toronto in 1927 of English parents — his father was a carpenter and First World War vet — Bill and his family returned to London, where they endured The Blitz during the early 1940s. Bill joined the British Army at 18 and spent time in the signal corps, beginning in 1945.His experiences as a teenage actor led him to the forces broadcasting system, where he trained as an operator and announcer. He spent six months in Germany and two years in Libya, re-settling in Canada after his discharge in 1948.Post-war, the only job he could find was as a junior announcer in Port Arthur, now part of Thunder Bay. By chance, he met Toots there and the couple remained married for 69 years, including nearly 60 in the same house.Luxton, a graduate of Lorne Greene’s broadcasting school in Toronto, eventually got a job at CKWS in Kingston in 1954, where he created the character Uncle Willy for a children’s cartoon show. He moved to Ottawa as one of the first employees at CJOH, which went on the air in 1961.It was there that Uncle Willy teamed with Floyd, the goofball character created by the rubber-faced Les Lye, and the pair — ad-libbing a good deal of their efforts — would help amuse a generation of children in zany wigs and clown-like costumes. “I’d like to be remembered for the more serious things I did,” he once said of his Willy days, upon receiving a lifetime achievement award from Ottawa’s ACTRA chapter.“But as long as they remember you.”Because of his English roots, Luxton was good at accents, which served him well in theatrical productions like Shaw’s Pygmalion, for which he won a best actor award at the Ottawa Little Theatre, where he was once a board member.“Bill was an ultimate professional and a terrific guy, a great pal and a great friend,” said Atkinson, who spoke to Luxton only days before his death. “He did a lot of radio with me and I did a lot of television with him.”The couples often socialized, taking regular vacations to Europe and Asia.Bill said his father was every bit the gentle, well-mannered man that viewers saw on television. “He was a very caring man. He really did care about the community and was kind and generous to people.”He is survived by Toots, daughter Susan, son Bill Jr. and two grandchildren. Details of the memorial service are still being worked out.To contact Kelly Egan, please call 613-726-5896 or email kegan@postmedia.comTwitter.com/kellyegancolumn'

Alternative lenders gain market share as total mortgage growth slows, CMHC says

Event USA New Updates

An increasing number of homeowners turned to alternative lenders last year, while new mortgage growth reached its slowest pace in more than a quarter of a century amid government interventions aimed at cooling the housing market, according to a new
'An increasing number of homeowners turned to alternative lenders last year, while new mortgage growth reached its slowest pace in more than a quarter of a century amid government interventions aimed at cooling the housing market, according to a new report. Alternative lenders, which take on clients with riskier profiles for shorter terms at higher interest rates, held one per cent of Canadian mortgages last year, according to a first-of-its kind report from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. There were 200 to 300 active alternative lenders in Canada last year holding $13 billion to $14 billion of outstanding Canadian mortgages. That’s up from $11 billion to $12 billion the year prior and $8 billion to $10 billion in 2016. The data suggests that “their share in this space is growing,” said Tania Bourassa-Ochoa, a specialist in housing research with CMHC. Loans from alternative lenders typically have terms between six months and two years. In 2018, they offered interest rates between 7.3 and 11 per cent, with an average of 8.99 per cent. Banks, by contrast, offered 3.3 per cent to 5.4 per cent rates on mortgage loans with terms that generally last several years. People who turn to alternative lenders have riskier profiles, according to the report. Their clientele includes people who are self-employed, investors carrying more than one property, and borrowers who need short-term cash due to poor credit history, health problems, divorce or other issues. Such mortgages have higher delinquency rates than those given by other lenders. In the third quarter of 2018, the delinquency rate for alternative lenders was 1.93 per cent, according to the report. Mortgage finance companies, credit unions, caisses populaires and banks all reported delinquency rates at 0.25 per cent or lower during that same time. “It gives me great concern,” said Laurie Campbell, CEO of the non-profit agency Credit Canada, of the rise in alternative lending. The short terms and high interest rates put people in a vulnerable position, she said, especially if interest rates are rising. It doesn’t help that many of these borrowers are people who could not qualify for a bank mortgage, making them higher risk, she said. They could get into a situation where rates are higher when their term is up and not even alternative lenders will renew their mortgage, she said, forcing them to sell their property. She suggests people desperate to get into the housing market who fail to be approved by a traditional lender determine what prevents them for qualifying, like a low credit score, and whether it’s possible to fix it going forward. If they do decide to sign a mortgage with an alternative lender, they need to recognize that it’s going to cost them a lot more over the long run, she said. An April report from CIBC’s deputy chief economist raised concerns over the rise in alternative lenders in Ontario. In 2018, alternative lenders made up nearly 12 per cent of transactions in Ontario and about 15 per cent in Greater Toronto, according to the report. That represented a roughly two-per-cent rise since Ottawa’s new mortgage stress test for traditional lenders came into play. Alternative lenders account for close to seven per cent of the market based on dollars, since average loan size is about half the size of bank loans. Benjamin Tal said at the time that alternative lending is part of a normally functioning mortgage market, but a fast-growing segment is not. A one-per cent market share is still a relatively small figure, said Bourassa-Ochoa. “We’re going to have to monitor how these numbers are changing in time in order to really see and understand more clearly if there is a vulnerability and what it is.” Last year also saw the slowest year-over-year growth in total mortgage debt in more than 25 years, according to the report. Throughout 2018, mortgage debt grew by between 3.4 per cent and 5.2 per cent with the pace maintaining at 3.4 per cent in the first quarter of this year. That’s down from between 5.2 per cent and 6.2 per cent in 2017 and 6.1 to 6.5 per cent in 2016. That decline comes from tougher government lending rules, higher borrowing costs and other factors. This is the first report of its kind by the CMHC, which plans to produce it on an annual basis and provide quarterly updates. “This report is really looking at filling so many missing pieces of the residential mortgage landscape,” said Bourassa-Ochoa, adding businesses, policy makers and others can use the data to make more informed decisions. CMHC’s report comes on the heels of a similar effort by Statistics Canada. The agency last week released its first set of data from a survey of non-bank mortgage lenders. It noted this data was previously “only collected by some organizations at the provincial level, for certain industries and with varying levels of detail.”   Follow @AleksSagan Aleksandra Sagan, The Canadian Press'

News Briefs: Java Monkey closes permanently; Kirkwood Library to reopen; new bus chief

Public Protection USA New Updates

Java Monkey before the fire (Photo courtesy Decaturish) The owners of Java Monkey Coffee House in Decatur have decided to close the business permanently after last fall’s alleged arson attack by a disgruntled former employee. According to
'Java Monkey before the fire (Photo courtesy Decaturish) The owners of Java Monkey Coffee House in Decatur have decided to close the business permanently after last fall’s alleged arson attack by a disgruntled former employee. According to Decaturish , the owners said the public had not supported changes made at the coffee house to make it profitable. Java Monkey had become widely known for its Sunday poetry open mic. The open mic hosted by Theresa Davis continues, under the name Java Speaks, every Sunday night at Ammazza Pizza in Decatur. The grand re-opening of the newly renovated Kirkwood Library, located at 11 Kirkwood Road, is set for Friday, July 19 at 10 a.m. The celebration will include a program in the library’s new community meeting room, a ribbon-cutting ceremony and tours of the new library, as well as light refreshments for guests. Collie Greenwood, formerly the chief service officer with the Toronto Transit Commission, has joined MARTA as chief of bus operations. In his role, Greenwood will be responsible for daily operations and maintenance of MARTA’s bus system, which includes a fleet of 532 buses and paratransit vans.'

Peter Thiel Says Elizabeth Warren Is Most ‘Dangerous’ Candidate

Politics USA New Updates

(Bloomberg) — Peter Thiel, the technology industry’s most prominent supporter of President Donald Trump, called Elizabeth Warren the most “dangerous” Democratic presidential candidate.In a rare television interview, Thiel said Monday night that
'(Bloomberg) — Peter Thiel, the technology industry’s most prominent supporter of President Donald Trump, called Elizabeth Warren the most “dangerous” Democratic presidential candidate.In a rare television interview, Thiel said Monday night that Warren, a Massachusetts senator, was the only Democrat talking about important issues like the economy.“All the others are almost equally unimpressive, in that it’s all identity politics in one flavor or another,” he told Fox News’s Tucker Carlson. “I’m most scared by Elizabeth Warren. I think she’s the one who’s actually talking about the economy, which is the only thing, the thing that I think matters by far the most.”Thiel spent most of the interview discussing the subject of a speech he gave Sunday at a conservative conference in Washington: what he called “seemingly treasonous” conduct by Google. The billionaire, who sits on the board of Facebook Inc., said the U.S. should investigate Google’s ties to China. In response, Google denied it works with the Chinese military.In 2016, Thiel established himself as a Silicon Valley pariah when he endorsed Trump for president. The venture capitalist donated $1.25 million to the campaign and spoke in support of Trump at the Republican National Convention. He reiterated his support of Trump in Sunday’s speech by praising the administration’s foreign policy, in particular the trade battle with China.The president reciprocated the adulation in a tweet Tuesday, calling Thiel “a great and brilliant guy.” Trump said his administration will look into Thiel’s claims that Google committed treason by working with the Chinese government.During the speech Sunday, Thiel made reference to Warren, who has advocated for breaking up big technology companies including Google and Facebook. She has said concentration of corporate power punishes small businesses and average Americans. Thiel said Google employees had donated to Warren’s campaign, suggesting “a little bit of a bad conscience.”Monday’s Fox News interview concluded with Thiel’s comments about the presidential race: “Elizabeth Warren is the dangerous one.”Story continues(Updates with Trump tweet in the sixth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Lizette Chapman in San Francisco at lchapman19@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Milian at mmilian@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com ©2019 Bloomberg L.P.'